New business models for creative outputs

By Nerida Quatermass

In creative life, many things motivate us to share. Sharing has many benefits. An obvious benefit in a traditional business model is a sale of work. But sharing creativity is also about engagement with your community. Engagement can be difficult to achieve in a world chock a block full of creative content.

Creators are exploring new models for engagement. Interested?

The free eBook Made with Creative Commons showcases some extra-ordinary examples of creators who share their works incorporating licensing under Creative commons licences. It’s still possible to sell your work! As an example, think Cards against Humanity.

The case studies in the book exemplify the power of sharing, which is a defining value of the  Creative Commons movement:

The power of the open licences to maximise innovation.

The power of case studies to provide a guided transition to incorporating Creative Commons in open business models.

The publication of the book itself is a great story about the power of community as the book was crowd-funded on Kickstarter.

In addition to accewaterdropsssing the eBook there are a number of ways that you can get hold of a copy of this book to keep.

(Made with Creative Commons. Cover design by Klaus Nielsen,

(Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash)



Bring out your data

Bring out your DATA to make your research datasets reusable, visible, discoverable and citable. Archiving and safely securely storing your data are important established steps in the scholarly communication process; increasingly, publishing and sharing your data is too.. Depositing data in QUT’s Research Data Finder is now easier than ever.

Publishing and sharing your research data, under a Creative Commons licence, is good practice and has benefits for you as a researcher since it enables you to get credit for your datasets.  Many funders now have data sharing requirements and, increasingly, journals and publishers have a data sharing policy. QUT supports researchers in securely storing and safely sharing research datasets.

Research Data Finder has a new look and increased functionality. It now contains over 230 records of research datasets. Examples include:

Sharing research data or information about data (metadata) can unlock opportunities for you as a researcher and can help drive innovation. QUT’s Management of Research Data policy encourages open data practices at QUT wherever possible, as there are many benefits to researchers and universities.

Contact the Research Data Librarian for more information on using Research Data Finder and the University Copyright Officer for information on licencing your dataset.

Cooking for Copyright

On the 31st of July librarians around Australia are doing something naughty… we are doing something against the law….we are going to bake!

What does baking have to do with copyright?

FAIR (Freedom of Access to Information and Resources), an initiative from the Australian Library and Information Association, are pushing for copyright reform in Australia to ensure that everyone has access to the rich history of unpublished work which is currently collecting dust in boxes.

In Australia, copyright is limited to 70 years after the death of the creator of a published work, but for unpublished work copyright lasts forever. FAIR is pushing for the same copyright laws to exist for published work and unpublished work.

So what are unpublished works? Unpublished works can include diaries, letters, records, and recipes. Librarians from around Australia have found some unpublished recipes which are technically not allowed to be shared under current copyright law and popped them on the FAIR website for everyone to use. Their goal is to create a social media frenzy so that those who have the responsibility of enacting copyright reform can hear the public voice.

If you would like to participate on Cooking for Copyright Day on the 31st July why don’t you get a bunch of friends together and try out some of these recipes? You can post pictures to the Cooking for Copyright Facebook page as well as using the hashtag #cookingforcopyright.

World Book and Copyright Day

UNESCO celebrates World Book and Copyright Day on April 23, an annual event where libraries around the world promote reading and the enjoyment of books.

Copyright is closely linked with the book publishing industry but is also relevant to us all when we are looking for content to reuse in the things we create. It is important to give credit where credit is due and provide the correct attribution details when you use the words, images or ideas of someone else.


Painting of a bison in the cave of Altamira by Rameessos (Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

When I am looking for free images to use in my work I like to use Google Advanced Image SearchFlickr Advanced Search or Wikimedia Commons. These tools allow you to limit to Creative Commons licensed or public domain content.  Creative Commons is an organisation that supports the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge and even has tools that make creating licenses for your own content easy.

These tools are good because they make it easy to find what you need without worrying about the complicated stuff.