Extended Library Opening Hours

It is that time of the semester when you want to spend all your time at the library in your favourite study spot…unfortunately so does everyone else! But have no fear of missing out on space at the library this semester as the Gardens Point Library in V Block has extended opening hours from 3rd June – 24th June. This means it will be open from 7am – 2am Monday to Friday and 9am – 2am on the weekends.

You will be able to access all your usual library study nooks and crannies including study rooms and computers and you can even borrow books and use the printing, copying and scanning services from the self service areas.

cat-718936_1280Make sure to have your QUT ID card on you at all times as you will need it to access the library during these extended hours. You can pop around to the swipe card access at the main library entrance next to the coffee shop Merlo to make your way inside.

Worried about haunting the library in the wee hours of the morning? QUT Security will be in the building at all times. Plus as an extra safety precaution, students are encouraged to carry a mobile phone and download the SafeZone app.

So grab your study gear, some caffeine and take advantage of late nights at QUT Library and grab your study nook!

*Please note, on the last day of extended hours we close at 10pm, due to a scheduled power outage.

Study Hack – Writing

SkeletonplanAcademic writing can be tough whether it be writing an essay or a literature review. We have some great resources in QUT Cite Write which will help you to get started, no matter what writing style you need.

First things first, make a skeleton plan. You can do this for your whole assignment and there are a lot of templates that can help you with this and some of them sound good! Try the hamburger or the diamond templates. After this, you can follow the same template (or try a new one) for each of your paragraphs. Use these templates to decide what information will go where. This will make it a whole lot easier to start writing when you know exactly what you are trying to say and when you want to say it.

ProofreadyourwrokOnce you have finished your assignment it is important that you edit and proof read. Check your grammar, punctuation and the flow of your words. Get someone else to have a look at it for you as a fresh pair of eyes may spot something you have missed. By editing and proof reading your work you will make sure your assignment works as a whole and most important of all, that it answers your task question.

Need more help? Visit QUT Support for learning.

Study Hack – Academic Honesty, what is it?

What is Academic honesty? You might have heard it referred to as plagiarism or cheating, at QUT we have a huge pile of resources to help you give credit where credit is due and be authentic in your studies.

BelieveOnline_JBSo what do you do if you have a whole bunch of great resources you want to use in your assignment? First off, it is great that you have found some resources relevant to your assignment but remember to have a good look at what your source is and where it came from. You want to use good quality information to back up your ideas and arguments. So make sure you don’t quote any information you haven’t verified!

findingInfoEasy_JB Next, you need to work the information into your assignment. You do this by direct quoting, summarising or paraphrasing their work. Remember, direct quotes should only take up 10% of your word count. Paraphrasing is the hardest but recommended. It is worthwhile aiming for as you can demonstrate your own understanding and show off your critical thinking skills! How to Paraphrase will give you some helpful tips so that you can put your best foot forward.

The final step you need to make is to acknowledge the work of the people whose resources you think are awesome have used in your assignment. Referencing or citing another person’s work is really important and there is loads of information about how to do this on QUT CiteWrite.

To avoid plagiarism make sure you reference and give credit to those who have come before you. And don’t forget, pictures and music need to be referenced too!

Need more help? Come and see us at the Library Help desk. No appointment needed.

Study Hack – Time management to the rescue!

Making a plan and sticking to it is often the hardest part of studying. If we can manage our priorities and commitments we can often get things done quicker and with less stress. With Easter coming up everyone is looking forward to a break. Having a break is just as important as studying, but how can you fit in a bit of R & R while still staying on track with your workload?

Why not look at some of the great time-management tools we have to offer to keep you on track and lower your stress levels.

To minimise cramming at the end of semester download a semester planner and stick it on your door, keeping track of your due dates in a visible place often helps you get things done sooner!

Assignment Calculator is a useful tool which breaks down your assessment into manageable chunks.

And if you manage to have the time for it check out the library’s website for some more quick tips and hints. To get started often simple things are the best. Why not write out a ‘to do’ list and highlight the important things?
StudyBreaks_JB
And finally, take study breaks! Everyone needs a rest every now and then to recharge. It can also unblock your mind and allow you to answer problems you were stuck on or see things in a different way.

Need more help? Come and see us in the Library and make a Study Solutions appointment.

Remember, good time management = less stress so why not give it a try?

 

 

Set up for study success this semester

The first week of semester is about meeting new mates, your tutors and lecturers and gathering unit information – assignment due dates, classes, exams. Staying on top of your study load and setting yourself up for success from Week 1 can be achieved with a little planning and bookmarking study support resources for when you need them.

Plan your semester

Planning is not about having your time set in stone, but more about seeing the bigger picture so you can afford to be flexible as things pop up during semester. Unexpected setbacks happen and when they do, a plan will help you to adjust your time so you can quickly get back on track.

To get started, you’ll need:

  • the academic calendar
  • an online calendar, like your QUT email calendar or Google Calendar – whichever works for you and you will refer to regularly

The academic calendar shows important dates related to your semester, such as mid-semester break and exam periods. Place or save the academic calendar somewhere you can access quickly, like your computer desktop. Next, input all your important dates over the semester, assignment due dates, exam study period, as well as your social and family commitments such as weddings or birthday parties. You’ll then start to see where you might need to start work on your assignments a little earlier if the due date clashes with your cousin’s 21st bash, for example. In your online calendar, block out time for your classes. Then add your regular work, family or other commitments. Setting up recurring appointments in an online calendar are time savers when planning your study load from week to week.

Now you have an idea of what your semester looks like and how much time you have for your coursework and assignments.

Handy tip: Bookmark the library’s Assignment Calculator to help you allow enough time for completing your assignments.

Keep study support within reach

Can’t make it to campus for a study skills workshop? Library staff have been busy over the summer preparing these workshops for online access through Blackboard. Once logged into Blackboard, either go to the community site directly and click ‘Enrol’, or use ‘Community Finder’ and search with the name ‘Library Back to Study’. By enrolling in the community site, you will have ready access to these resources from your Blackboard home page.

Topics include reading and note taking, undertaking research and returning to university study, with helpful hints and strategies.

Need help through the semester? Ask a Librarian – by phone, at the Library Helpdesk or online.

We’re here to help.

Be prepared: Getting the best out of Study Solutions!

" Day133: Flickr keeps you studying!" By Abdulrahman AlZe3bi. CC BY-NC 2.0

” Day133: Flickr keeps you studying!” By Abdulrahman AlZe3bi. CC BY-NC 2.0

At the Library, there really is no such thing as a stupid question. Did you know that the most common question we get asked is, “Where are the bathrooms?” Helping you to find the bathroom is just one of the many ways we can help in the Library.

Many students get stuck with pesky research, writing and referencing questions over the course of the semester. At every branch Library, you can have your researching and referencing questions answered straight away at the Library Helpdesk. Our staff are trained to help you get started and point you in the right direction to get your assignments started.

If you have a longer or more complicated question, the Library can provide support for your studies through a Study Solutions appointment. By booking a Study Solutions appointment, you can get a 25 minute face to face appointment for help with your study, research and assignments. From understanding your assignment question, providing feedback on a draft, to working in groups, or organising your work/study load, we are here to help.

You can book a 25 minute consultation from Week 3. Bookings open a week in advance and fill up quickly – so be prepared and book early.

If you miss out on an appointment, never fear! Drop-in sessions are available at both Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove libraries from 12pm-2pm, Tuesday to Thursday. The time of your consultation will depend on how many students are waiting – so be prepared and have your burning question ready and waiting to maximise your time.

So! You’ve booked a consultation or you’re planning on coming to a drop-in session…. what can you do to prepare yourself to get the best out of your Study Solutions session?

1. Be on time! Make sure to note the date, time, and location of your consultation. Write it in your phone, diary, or the back of your hand. Remember you can keep track of your bookings online.

2. Come to your consultation with something specific to work on. Whether it be your assignment question, your draft, a particular study issue you’ve been having, or a question about a resource – this helps us to tailor the support specifically to your needs. Please remember that library staff cannot proofread assignments for you, we can give you tips and strategies so you can proofread yourself (hint: read your assignment out loud to the mirror!).

3. Check our online study resources and see if your question is answered there. If you familiar yourself with resources such as Cite Write, Studywell, and Studysmart, you’ll be well on your way to being a top student on your own!

4. If you’re looking for specific academic language and learning support you can get in touch with Academic Language and Learning Services (ALLS) to arrange an appointment. Language and Learning Educators are specially trained to help students and staff who need help with speaking and writing.

 

Mythbuster Series: Shhhhhhh!

Myth #1: You can’t talk in the library.

Not-A-Librarian: “You must love telling people to be quiet all the time.”

Please Keep Quiet in the Library By Enokson (CC BY 2.0)

Librarian: “Only when people ask that question.”

Contrary to popular belief librarians don’t revel in shushing people all day. The days of the library being a silent place of study are long-gone and librarians are embracing the community spirit. We like to think of the library as a place where students can not only do individual silent study but come to work on assignments or study with peers.

To help facilitate your collaborative study needs we have group study rooms available for you to book in advance. If you need to blow off some steam after an exam or assignment, why not get a group of friends together and play some games in the Games Lab. Students are free to talk to their peers on each level of the library – except those areas that are marked for silent study (the top two floors of Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove Libraries).

So remember, the library doesn’t need to be the kind of place you can hear a pin-drop but be mindful of your fellow students and keep noise to a respectful minimum (or we’ll have to shush you!).

Light! End of the tunnel!

You're nearly there minifig! 'Small Climb' by  Black Zack (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

You’re nearly there minifig! ‘Small Climb’ by Black Zack
(CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The weather’s warming up, and all that sunshine is like a beacon of hope – it’s almost the end of semester! You’ve already handed in a few assignments and things are rolling along. To make sure you keep the momentum going, here are a few tips:

  • Use the Assignment Calculator to help manage your time on these last assessments.
  • Set some time aside for each of your assessment pieces. A weekly planner is available here.
  • If you aren’t sure about your assignment task, talk to your tutor or lecturer about what is required.
  • Ask someone at the Library Helpdesk to show you our online learning resources and help you find information.
  • Book a Study Solutions appointment for a 25 minute one-on-one appointment to talk about your assignment.
  • Check out your faculty’s peer assistance program to talk to another student about your study.

Time can slip away quickly. For best results with less stress, start early, work consistently and finish strong!

So, learning to knit ISN’T going to help with my essay?

Procrastination-001 by  Ludie Cochrane (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Procrastination-001 by Ludie Cochrane (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Sorry procrastinators and those who thrive on the adrenaline rush of last-minute essay completion – the results are in and it’s not good news. A study out of the University of Warwick Business School has shown that students who hand in assignments at the last minute face a five per cent drop in marks when compared with those who submitted 24 hours or more before it was due.

The paper, Time of submission: An indicator of procrastination and a correlate of performance on undergraduate marketing assignments, which was presented at the European Marketing Academy conference investigated 504 first-year students’ and 273 third-year students’ end of term assignments

Work handed in ahead of schedule was far more likely to be awarded a distinction than work not handed in until much closer to the deadline. The average mark dropped by the hour until those handing in the paper at the last minute produced the worst results. Those that literally handed work in at the last minute could see as much as a five per cent drop on score, from 64.17 to 59.00 — taking them a whole grade lower.

Image provided by David Arnott and Scott Dacko, of Warwick Business School http://www.wbs.ac.uk/news/leaving-essays-to-the-last-minute-ruins-students-grades/

So what can you do about your procrastination habit?  How do you stop yourself from meandering into the depths of pointless activities, random hobbies (not that there isn’t value in knowing how to knit) and delaying the inevitable task ahead?

It’s all about time management.

  • The nifty QUT Library Assignment Calculator can keep you on track to complete an assignment with plenty of time to spare – including reminding you to take breaks and have some fun along the way!
  • For a more long-range view of how to manage your time across the semester, the QUT Library Semester & Weekly Planning guide can help you see at a glance what’s looming and help you juggle all your competing priorities.
  • For specific essay help, the Library Writing an Essay guide as well as our most popular resource, the Writing Structure Overview, specifically address the requirements of essay writing.

Also, check out our related QUT Library Blog post Writing great Assignments for more tips and save the knitting until semester break.

Because proofreading!

The now notorious bus stop in Bristol. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA

Bup? Really? Anyone who saw this picture in the media last week would have been incredulous at how on earth these sign writers managed this spelling absurdity: ‘Bup Stop’. Read the full story here.

Still, it does prove how easily spelling and grammar mistakes can slip through unnoticed. Your spelling mistakes are unlikely to trend on Twitter of course but the consequences and damage to your marks can be high.

Whereas editing looks at the ‘bigger picture’ of your writing: structure,style and task requirements, proofreading drills down to the finer points: spelling, grammar, word choice and punctuation.

Here are some key tips for proofreading:

  • Read your assignment out loud one sentence at a time. Often mistakes are easier to hear than see.
  • A sentence should only have one point. If it’s longer than two or three lines perhaps it should be more than one sentence
  • Use a spell checker – but do not rely on it!
  • Learn to spell the words and jargon and that you will be using often.
  • Check your work by reading it backwards. You’ll concentrate on each word individually this way rather than seeing what’s expected.
  • Get a critical friend – no, not a ‘frenemy’ but someone who can read your work and spot mistakes and give constructive feedback.

You can read more on the Editing and Proofreading on QUT Library’s Studywell.