NAIDOC Week – Our Languages Matter

2017 National NAIDOC logo

NAIDOC Week runs from the 2-9 July and celebrates the rich history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia. This year’s theme is ‘Our Languages Matter’ and hopes to emphasise the vital role Indigenous language plays in the cultural identity, spirituality for Indigenous Australians and in linking them to their land and water.

Today only about 120 languages from over 250 are still spoken and many are at risk of being lost. Each unique language carries with it stories, rites and knowledge so it is important they each one is preserved and maintained. Ms Anne Martin, National NAIDOC Committee Co-Chair has said,

“Each language is associated with an area of land and has a deep spiritual significance and it is through their own languages, that Indigenous nations maintain their connection with their ancestors, land and law.”

This NAIDOC Week why not learn about the languages that shaped Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Here are some of the resources available at QUT Library that can get you started on your language journey.

National Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs annually marking two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: The 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision, respectively.  This year is highly significant because it is 50 years since the 1967 referendum, and 25 years since the historic Mabo decision.

This year QUT Library will be running a number of events  as part of National Reconciliation Week from 27 May – 3 June. Throughout the week, QUT Library Kelvin Grove will host a number of video screenings, music and book displays on Level 2, 3 & 4 of the building.

Also, during this time the Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove HiQ digital walls will be showcasing Indigenous talent, culture and history, with features from outstanding QUT Alumni.

Please come and join us in celebrating these highly important events in Australia’s reconciliation journey.

Celebrating NAIDOC Week

aboriginal-art-503444_1280 cropJuly 3 to 10 is NAIDOC Week. NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islander Day Observance Committee and celebrates Aboriginal and Islander history, culture and achievements. It is a time to recognise the contributions Aboriginals and Islanders have made to Australia and our society.

There are lots of ways you can celebrate NAIDOC Week. The official NAIDOC website has Australia wide events that you can participate in.

Here are our top recommendations for celebrating NAIDOC Week and enjoying your break at the same time –

  • Put a NAIDOC poster on your fridge, wall or even in your study or work area.
  • Check QUT Library’s collection and borrow a book or watch a movie about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history.
  • Relax and listen to some Indigenous musicians.
  • Research the traditional Indigenous owners of your area.
  • Visit local Indigenous sites of significance. RACQ has published a great guide so you can look for places near you!

Have a look at NAIDOC for more ideas on how you can celebrate NAIDOC week.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art works in the Library

'Buttons 2' an image by Leah King-Smith will be on display on level 3 of the Gardens Point Library until August 31. King-Smith, Leah (collection artist, 1957) Buttons 2 (From the series 'Beyond Capture') 2004 Pigment dye Image 86.5 (H) x 88 (W) Frame 111.4cm (H) x 113cm (W) x 2.9cm (D) 2005.027 Purchased 2005

‘Buttons 2’ an image by Leah King-Smith will be on display on level 3 of the Gardens Point Library until August 31.
King-Smith, Leah (collection artist, 1957)
Buttons 2 (From the series ‘Beyond Capture’) 2004
Pigment dye
Image 86.5 (H) x 88 (W)
Frame 111.4cm (H) x 113cm (W) x 2.9cm (D) 2005.027
Purchased 2005

Call 911 - a colour inkjet print by Gordon Bennett is on display on level 2 of the Kelvin Grove Library.  Bennett, Gordon (collection artist, 1955) Call 911 2006 Colour inkjet print Sheet 82.5 (H) x 61 (W) Mount 35inches (H) x 28inches (W) 2006.014 Purchased 2006

Call 911 – a colour inkjet print by Gordon Bennett is on display on level 2 of the Kelvin Grove Library.
Bennett, Gordon (collection artist, 1955)
Call 911
2006
Colour inkjet print
Sheet 82.5 (H) x 61 (W)
Mount 35inches (H) x 28inches (W) 2006.014
Purchased 2006

This shark headdress is part of the installation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art works in the Library.   Thaiday, Ken (collection artist, 1950) Beizam (Shark) head-dress 1994 Enamel paint on plywood, varnished bamboo, plastic swivel and cockatoo, chicken and hawk feathers 62 (H) x 50 (W) x 74 (D) 1995.016 Purchased 1995

This shark headdress is part of the installation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art works in the Library.
Thaiday, Ken (collection artist, 1950)
Beizam (Shark) head-dress
1994
Enamel paint on plywood, varnished bamboo, plastic swivel and cockatoo, chicken and hawk feathers
62 (H) x 50 (W) x 74 (D) 1995.016
Purchased 1995

 

The TEDx lounges aren’t all that’s happening at QUT Library this National Reconciliation Week. We’ve partnered with the QUT Art Collection to bring you a series of contemporary and traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art works at our Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove Branch Libraries.

Each piece is accompanied by a small didactic (an explanation about the artist and the artwork) so that you can find out more about the artist and the artwork. These pieces will be on display until August 31, 2015 so you’ll have plenty of time to enjoy them.

Some of the featured artists include Gordon Bennett, Alick Tipoti, Tony Albert, Peace Woolla, Maribella Ngallametta, Rotanna Ngallametta, Gloria Fletcher, Ken Thaiday, Susie Napangati, and Leah King-Smith.

The artworks showcase a range of techniques from photography to etching, weaving and sculpting.

 

A head-dress by Ken Thaiday will be on display on level 6 of the Gardens Point Library.  Thaiday is a senior Torres Strait Islander artist from Erub (Darnley) Island, where he grew up watching his father perform complex dances at traditional ceremonies. Sculptural headdresses, instruments and body adornments played an important role in these rituals which served to connect the spiritual and physical worlds. Thaiday’s headdresses are contemporary interpretations of traditional items, designed to keep his cultural history alive.

Get involved and show your support for reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians by visiting this beautiful collection.