GIF IT UP

GIF IT UP is an annual gif-making competition for the most creative reuse of digitised cultural heritage material. This year’s 6th edition is run by Europeana in close cooperation with Digital Public Library of AmericaDigital NZ and Trove.

QUT Library Digital Collections has three submissions created from digitised cultural heritage material.

If you like our gifs please vote for us!

  1. Click here to view OUR gif

    Source material: 1. Territet-Glion funicular railway; 2. Children’s party in the grounds of the Herston residence, Coralyn, ca. 1907| Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange; 3. Glasshouse mtns Beerwah, 1894
    | Queensland University of Technology via Trove
    The images used by this GIF are sourced from Queensland University of Technology Digital Collections. The Territet–Glion funicular railway image is a postcard from Montreaux, Switzerland and the photo with the young ladies are from the L’Estrange collection. The mountain in the background is one of the Glasshouse mountain images from the QUT Stories collection.

  2. Click here to view our gif

    Source material: Unknown people in horse drawn cart and coachman; possibly Chester, England (Bache Hall) Inside grocery shop possibly Kelvin Grove Queensland Harrison’s jams and jellies display | Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange | Queensland University of Technology

  3. click here to view our gif

    Source material: Shot putterInside grocery shop possibly Kelvin Grove QueenslandHarrison’s jams and jellies display | Robert Augustus Henry L’Estrange | Queensland University of Technology via Trove

You can view all entries here at GIF IT UP

 

Mo Can Do

Thinking of growing a moustache? November, or Movember, is the ideal time, as your mo can play an important role in promoting men’s health (it can look good, too).

Conceived in Melbourne in 2003 to raise funds for prostate cancer research, Movember is now an international movement and the leading global organisation tackling prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and male suicide and other mental health issues.

Not thinking of growing a moustache? There are other ways you can take part in Movember to help men live happier, healthier, longer lives.

If you’re interested in learning more about the history of Movember, watch this entertaining TED Talk by the movement’s co-founder Adam Garone – just one of numerous moustache-related resources available through QUT Library.

 

November 11 is Remembrance Day

November 11 is Remembrance Day, which commemorates those who lost their lives in war, conflict and military service for Australia.

Traditionally, a silence is observed at 11am on the 11th of November, which comes from the “the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month”: the time and date that the armistice between the Allies and Germany ended the First World War in 1918.

Remembrance Day is also observed in other nations, sometimes by another name like Memorial Day or Veterans Day.  The day is observed in the USA, Commonwealth countries including Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and many Caribbean nations, France, Belgium and Serbia.

Originally known as Armistice Day, Remembrance Day was first meant to commemorate those who died in WWI. But since WWII, the day came to include people who had died in later wars too.

Remembrance Day traditions generally focus on members of the armed forces and military who died in conflict, but other people may be commemorated too. Casualties of conflict or peacekeeping missions include civilian nurses and medical staff, members of auxiliary services (including women’s auxiliaries), humanitarian volunteers, war correspondents and police officers assisting in peacekeeping activities.

Red poppy flowers are used in Remembrance Day traditions, and are a common symbol of commemoration of those killed in conflict. Red poppies grew in the churned-up soil of the Western Front in WWI, and their bright red colour eerily evoked the spilled blood of fallen soldiers.

Remembrance Day ceremonies commonly include the Last Post bugle call, which was used on the battlefield to announce the end of the day’s activities and the time for sleep. It is now also used at remembrance ceremonies and military funerals to signify that the soldier’s duty has ended and they can rest in peace.

Take a moment to view the display at the Kelvin Grove Library on level 3 (pictured above) and feel free to borrow any displayed items.

Anti-Poverty Week

Anti-Poverty Week 13 – 19 of October 

Anti-Poverty Week supports the Australian community to have an increased understanding of poverty and to take action collectively to end it.

For more information about poverty in Australia visit the Anti-Poverty website.

QUT library also has a large number of resources about poverty and you can check them out here.

Seek help @ QUT

If you find yourself in need of financial assistance while you’re studying with QUT, we offer a number of support services to help get you through, just click here.

The QUT Guild Foodbank can also provide basic food items to get you through, they stock non-perishable items, fresh fruit and veg and hygiene products.

 

Open Access Week at QUT

Guest blog by Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) & Professor in the Division of Research and Innovation, QUT

As we head towards the end of October – we again turn our focus to a week dedicated to open access (OA). Now in its 11th year, International Open Access Week, 21-27 October, is a global, community-driven week of action aimed at opening up access to research. It has grown into a truly national and global celebration.

This year’s theme is “Open for whom? Equity in Open Knowledge.” As open access becomes increasingly the norm, the 2019 Open Access Week Advisory Committee poses the question, “Whose interests are being prioritized in the actions we take and in the platforms that we support? Whose voices are excluded? Are underrepresented groups included as full partners from the beginning? Are we supporting not only open access but also equitable participation in research communication?” Building upon last year’s theme, “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge,” these questions will help us determine how emerging open systems for research will address inequities in the current system and ensure that we don’t unintentionally replicate and reinforce them.

There has been much discussion over the past year of open access news from Europe and elsewhere, and especially of Plan S. Open Access Week is a time to remind ourselves, however, that open access is not an end in itself; it is a means to an end – that of an equitable, efficient, and FAIR means of sharing scholarly information. For academics who publish openly the benefits are concrete. A better readership for open articles is not surprising, but the benefit of increased academic usage are also becoming clearer through more citations. Other benefits are of increased citations associated with posting of preprints and of data sharing. Critically, depositing in an OA repository such as QUT’s ePrints, is demonstrated to be the best way to boost citations. Furthermore, open articles are better connected into global systems for sharing information, which means that ultimately they can have wider societal impact. Depositing records and full text is the most important way that QUT researchers can comply with QUT’s open access policy and that of the two big Australian funders, ARC and NHMRC — all for free. But more than that, QUT’s repository allows anyone anywhere to access its research outputs.

QUT Library and others will be celebrating Open Access Week with a number of events. Once again we will bringing our popular Open Access Bike Tour to Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove campuses on Monday 21 and Tuesday 22 October. There will be OA giveaways, lucky dips, badges and more. Watch this short video of last year’s bike tour, and see below to find out when the Open Access Bike will be coming to a campus near you.

 

All are welcome to attend a webinar with an international focus on Monday 21 October, entitled Advancing Science in Indonesia: Current Global Research Practices. In addition to myself, the webinar features Professor Brian Nosek, the Executive Director of the Center for Open Science, Professor Simine Vazire from University of California, Davis and focuses on improving research practices in science.

On Wednesday 23 October we will be launching Hacky Hour at QUT: Skills for Open Research. Come along to The Pantry at 2:00pm and chat with an expert about skills for open research. Follow us on Twitter @GPHackyHour for details.

Join QUT IP & Innovation Research on Thursday 24 October for a thought-provoking symposium on Open Innovation. This free event, featuring speakers from a range of disciplines, will examine Open Education, Law, Culture, Open Cities, Additive Manufacturing, Agriculture, Robotics and more. Register here.

If you will be attending eResearch Australasia, be sure to come along to our session on Doing open access advocacy by stealth. Stephanie Bradbury, Manager Research Support Team, QUT Library, and I will be running this interactive workshop on Thursday 24 October from 11:40am-12:40pm.

Come along and get involved. For more details, follow @QUTLibrary on Twitter or email library.research@qut.edu.au.

R U OK?

R U OK? Day is Thursday 12 September – Get involved!

R U Ok? Day is dedicated to reminding everyone that every day is the day to ask, “Are you ok?” and support those struggling with life’s ups and down . This year the message is for everyone to Trust the Signs, Trust your Gut & Ask R U OK?

For more conversation tips visit the R U OK? website.

Seek help @ QUT

QUT has a range of support services available to staff and students including free confidential counselling

Other help available

Lifeline 24-Hour Counselling – 13 11 14. Lifeline is a national charity providing Australians experiencing a personal crisis with access to 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. Calls to this number are free if made from a mobile, and charged the cost of a local call if made from landline number.

Kids Help line – 1800 55 1800. Kids Helpline is a free, private and confidential, phone counselling service specifically for young people aged between 5 and 25 years. Counselling can be via the telephone, web-based or email, and is available 24-hours a day, 7-days a week.

BeyondBlue – 1300 22 4636. In addition to offering a number of resources about mental health related issues, BeyondBlue also offers a 24 hours, 7 days a week telephone counselling service, as well as an online chat service, online chats through community forums and an email service.

 

 

Brisbane Writers Festival

Celebrate the written word at this year’s Brisbane Writers Festival, 5-8 September.

Hosted by the State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Art Gallery & Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA), and various public libraries around Brisbane, the BWF features an impressive program of panel discussions, workshops, performances, and meet-the-writer sessions.

It’s a great opportunity for readers of all persuasions–not to mention students in Creative Writing and related disciplines–to hear local and international writers read and discuss their work. The diverse program comprises novelists, poets, children’s authors, journalists, historians, philosophers, and at least one former Prime Minister.

This year’s line-up includes Brisbane-born Melissa Lucashenko, whose novel Too Much Lip won the 2019 Miles Franklin Award; British author Jasper Fforde, perhaps best known for his highly original novel The Eyre Affair; multiple Walkley Award-winning journalist Kerry O’Brien; and over 150 other writers.

For devotees of Young Adult literature and getting into things for free, the BWF is hosting Love YA, a full day of (free) events at Brisbane Square Library, Saturday 7th September. Meet notable Australian YA authors such as James Moloney, Randa Abdel-Fattah, and Will Kostakis. If you’re not familiar with their books, there’s a good selection in QUT Library’s Curriculum Collection.

The work of many other featured BWF writers can be found in the Library’s General Collection.

It’s Pride Month!

rainbow on blue background with white clouds

Pride Month is here! Celebrations at QUT kick off this Friday with Wear it Purple hosted by LTU, The Guild and Queer Collective and finish with QUT Guild Pride Fest from 23-27 September. See below for live events and check back in to the events page for updates including the Pride Fest program.

Looking to learn and grow? This article from ReachOut article is a good place to start: What is an LGBTQIA+ ally, and how can I be a good one? You may also want to attend Pronouns: a conversation to find out more about why people declare their pronouns, and how it can impact those around you.

 Attend a Pride event at QUT:

 Wear it Purple Day: Your chance to Stand Up and Stand Out for LGBTIQA+ young people. There’ll be stalls, Wear it Purple freebies, purple food and friendly folks who are open to chat. There will be a solidarity photo at 12:30pm.

Out and proud? Come and share the positive impact that your visibility has had on your (chosen) family, friends and community. Consider yourself an ally? This is your opportunity to put your words into action and connect with Ally Network members.

Friday 30 August, 10am – 2pm on both campuses. Find out more about how you can get involved.

Pronouns: a conversation: Have you noticed people declaring their pronouns, but not sure why? Come along to hear from the Queensland Aids Council (QuAC) and a panel of QUT speakers who will take us through why we use pronouns, the impact this can (and does) have at an individual level, and what is happening in this space internationally.  Be part of the conversation about pronouns at QUT and have the opportunity to share your experience and ask questions.

Thursday 5 September, 12-1pm, OJW room, Gardens Point. Register to attend.

Diverse genders and sexualities research forum: Join us during Pride Month for our second showcase of QUT researchers working in the area of diverse genders and sexualities. Brief presentations will be followed by an opportunity for Q&A and networking.

Tuesday 17 September, 12pm-2pm, E Block, Kelvin Grove. Find out more and register via Eventbrite.

Brisbane Pride March: In 2019 we will be joining with friends from UQ, Griffith, USQ and USC under a University Unity banner. Join us to march with your work mates, family and friends to demonstrate acceptance, unity, inclusivity and support for the LGBTIQA+ community. Be one of the first 100 people to register and you’ll receive a University Unity t-shirt to wear on the day.

Saturday 21 September, 9:30-11:30am, Fortitude Valley. Find out more and register your interest to receive updates.

Bi+ Visibility Picnic: Join QUT’s Pride Staff Network for a picnic to celebrate Bi+ Visibility Day. BYO lunch, scintillating conversation provided. Members of the bi+ community and allies are welcome to come along, share stories, raise awareness and celebrate bi+ sexuality.

Feel free to stay the whole time, drop in and say hello, or give us a wave from across the lawn.

Monday 23 September, 12-1pm, A Block lawn, Kelvin Grove.

Digital displays – flags of pride: Not technically an event, but informative and beautiful. Visit the Cube, Sphere and HiQ digital walls during Pride Month to learn about some of the more common pride flags and the meanings behind their designs.

Children’s Book Week

CONGRATULATIONS to the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) 2019 Book of the Year Award winners and honour books! Gritty, contemporary themes are tackled by many books, challenging their readers to contemplate a range of important social issues.

You can access the CBCA website for the Winners,  CBCA Short list and Notables list.

The Library has a lovely display of the CBCA books. All titles are available for loan and can be found in the Curriculum area on level 4 of R Block, Kelvin Grove Library.

 

We also have a Children’s Literature Library Subject Guide where you can read the shortlisted and winning books and follow the links to QUT Library’s online and print copies.

Enjoy Children’s Book Week and happy reading !

Children’s Book Week is coming!

Reading is my secret power

The Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) presents annual awards to books of literary merit, for outstanding contribution to Australian children’s literature. The winners are announced Friday 16 August with CBCA Book Week following from 17-23 August.

The QUT Kelvin Grove Library supports this event with a wonderful display of 2019 Shortlist and Notables titles in the Curriculum area on level 4 of R Block. These titles are available for loan. You can access the CBCA website for the announcement of the WinnersCBCA Short list and Notables list. The categories for book of the year are:

  • Book of the year: Older readers (ages 13-18 years)
  • Book of the year: Younger readers (ages 7-12 years)
  • Book of the year: Early childhood (ages 0-6 years)
  • Picture book of the year
  • Eve Pownall Award (factual material, ages 0-18 years)
  • New illustrator (ages 0-18 years)

Enjoy your secret power and we hope to see you in the Library soon!