National Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs annually marking two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: The 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision, respectively.  This year is highly significant because it is 50 years since the 1967 referendum, and 25 years since the historic Mabo decision.

This year QUT Library will be running a number of events  as part of National Reconciliation Week from 27 May – 3 June. Throughout the week, QUT Library Kelvin Grove will host a number of video screenings, music and book displays on Level 2, 3 & 4 of the building.

Also, during this time the Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove HiQ digital walls will be showcasing Indigenous talent, culture and history, with features from outstanding QUT Alumni.

Please come and join us in celebrating these highly important events in Australia’s reconciliation journey.

National Simultaneous Storytime 2017

National Simultaneous Storytime will be held on Wednesday 24 May 2017, as part of Library and Information Week.

An annual event, National Simultaneous Storytime provides an opportunity for libraries, schools, pre-schools, childcare centres, family homes, bookshops and many other places around the country to promote the value of reading to young Australians.

The-Cow-Tripped-Over-The-Moon-Book-Cover-Image

You’re invited to participate in National Simultaneous Storytime, which this year takes place at 11am this Wednesday 24 May. Everyone can join National Simultaneous Storytime – it doesn’t matter whether you are a home school, a public library or even a university library! This year both Kelvin Grove Library and Caboolture Library will be participating in National Simultaneous Storytime so join in and share The Cow Tripped Over the Moon written by Tony Wilson and illustrated by Laura Wood.

There are plenty of resources available to support your National Simultaneous Storytime event – check out these Teacher Notes for The Cow Tripped Over the Moon and get creative making these finger puppets to accompany your reading of the book!

ANZAC Day 2017

On the 25th of April 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed on the beaches of Gallipoli in the First World War. Today, we acknowledge ANZAC day as a time for national remembrance and reflection to commemorate those who served or continue to serve in the Australian armed forces.

There are a wealth of resources available from QUT Library if you want to know more about ANZAC day and the legacy it has created, take a look at some of the videos we’ve selected below:

Making It Right: To mark Anzac Day, Kris Flanders travels to Adelaide and meets Indigenous war veterans who talk about entitlements and what it was like fighting on the front line

Anzac secrets: Many men and women came home from Gallipoli, put their medals away and tried to erase painful memories by not talking about them

Recognising the role of women in the Australian Defence Force: When Australia commemorates the Anzac centenary this weekend, most of the tributes will be paid to the thousands of men who died fighting

Open science, open data – the World Science Festival Brisbane

“It’s not enough to do it; it must be communicated” – Virginia Barbour, Executive Director, Australasian Open Access Strategy Group, on a key concept in science.

Providing open access to research, including publications, data, software, methodologies and all other research outputs, is a growing worldwide initiative, as is the drive to solve real-world problems and stimulate innovation.  The lack of access to research publications and their accompanying data is inhibiting national and international collaboration, public debate and research, however, times are changing.

Originally applied only to data, the F.A.I.R. principles now apply to all research outputs, as proposed at a November 2016 meeting of the G20 Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers Meeting.  Research findings that are F.A.I.R. are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable.

“With F.A.I.R. access, Australian research will be more visible, the broader community will have better access to well-founded knowledge, Australian researchers will be able to more easily collaborate locally and globally, including with industry, and the Australian research enterprise will be more accountable to the community it serves” – F.A.I.R. Access Working Group

Dr Salvatore Mele from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports that research in the field of physics has always been openly available, with researchers posting each other hard copies of publications that were submitted for review.  During the World Science Festival, which is being held in Brisbane from 22-26 March, the world-renowned Large Hadron Collider will be on display at the Queensland Museum.

Managed by CERN, the data collected from use of the Collider are published in the CERN Open Data Portal, and are accompanied by the software and documentation required to make sense of the data being shared.  Here at QUT, researchers can publish their data and accompanying material through our data repository, Research Data Finder.  We’re doing our bit to accelerate open science by providing access to open data!

Take a look at datasets that have already been added, including ‘Fusion transcripts in prostate cancer using RNA sequences derived from Australian and Chinese men’ by Dr Jyotsna Batra and Dr John Lai, and perhaps add one of your own at QUT Research Data Finder.

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize 2017

SAGE is offering cash prizes ($1500 First Prize, $900 Second Prize and $500 Third Prize) for the top three papers, accepted for publication, by a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student. You have until 14th September 2017 to enter, so sharpen those pencils! The awards will go to HDR students who are the lead author on a manuscript judged to be among the top three papers, and accepted by a peer reviewed journal, with a Q1 ranking in Scimago.  The paper must have been accepted between the 1st January 2017 and the 31st of August 2017.

To be eligible to enter, you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Happy Library Lovers Day!

The 14th of February is a day for lovers, Library Lovers to be exact! Libraries around Australia have embraced the day as a chance to remind policy makers about the wonderful work librarians do and the important role libraries have in society.

Take a moment to say thank you to your local librarian or visit a library you haven’t been to before. Share your #librarylove on social media, even if it is just a shot of your personal collection.

Remember, the QUT Library website is a great place to start looking for information for your research or general study skills.

Love Your Data Week 2017

From the 13th to the 17th of February, along with other academic and research libraries, data archives and organisations, QUT Library is celebrating the value and importance of research data, which are (we believe) crucial for advancing our knowledge of the world around us.

The theme for the 2017 social media event is ‘data quality’ and each day focuses on a different aspect of research data management:

13 February – Defining data quality

14 February – Documenting, describing, defining

15 February – Good data examples

16 February – Finding the right data

17 February – Rescuing unloved data

QUT researchers are also getting into the swing of things!  Here’s what Associate Professor Adrian Barnett from the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health has to say about issues he’s faced in the research data management process:

“A huge issue is data access. I’ve seen PhDs and postdocs ruined because individuals and groups won’t release or share data, even though it’s almost always data collected from the public and the goal of the research is always to improve public health. And oftentimes, the groups are doing nothing with the data, they just don’t want to share it just in case.

People also wear themselves out collecting too much data. At the project design stage, there’s often a lot of thought that a particular variable or new data source would be great to collect. If multiple people with different “pet” variables are involved, the data collection becomes massive and eats all of the project budget and time. An analysis is then hastily done because there’s no time or energy left. Answering a few questions well is the better option than answering a lot of questions badly.”

Dr Tony Beatton, a researcher from the School of Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business who’s completing a PhD on the economics of happiness and whose research is founded on the application of primary-source datasets to has this to say:

“Given clean, accurate data, a researcher can look for patterns that explain human behaviour.  To do this, we need:

  1. A desire to use data as the basis for examining research questions;
  2. Access to quality data, which the QUT library certainly enables;
  3. Technical skills in mathematics and statistics, which enable us to;
  4. Apply the data plus our technical skills and knowledge of the literatures to examine important research questions.

The truth is in the numbers which manifest in the data.”

If you’re a researcher, leave a comment below on your experience with data, or any tips, tricks and resources that you wished someone had shared with you!

Visit the Love Your Data blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation or to view more, go to Twitter (#LYD17, #loveyourdata), Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

Get your Research on at ResBaz!

Kickstart your research in 2017 with the Research Bazaar (ResBaz). It is on in Brisbane again this year and is hosted by The University of Queensland. ResBaz is an international festival celebrating digital literacies that are the foundation of modern research. It facilitates collaboration between early career researchers, PhD students, and researchers at other stages of their career using the next generation of digital research tools. You can learn from peers about the digital skills needed for cutting edge research in the 21st century!

There are several events happening in Brisbane throughout ResBaz including a Festival Day and a variety of workshops. Some of the information shared will be about OpenRefine and Web scrapers, bioinformatics as well as some Software Carpentry lessons.

For those able to get to Brisbane the details are as follows –

Where: University of Queensland, St Lucia campus (Advanced Engineering Building)

When: 7-9 February, 2017.

What: ResBaz includes several events and workshops. Registration for the market day is available and recommended. Registration for the workshops is essential.

For those who can’t to get to Brisbane, don’t worry! ResBaz is an international event and hosted in other locations around the globe so you can find a ResBaz location near you.

Can’t make it toResBaz? No worries, QUT Library offers research support to students. Check out QUT Library’s resources for researchers and the training and assistance we offer to all Higher Degree Research Students, other researchers and research support staff.

Delicious Ideas for Australia Day

Australia Day is just around the corner! One last public holiday before start of Semester 1. QUT Library is taking a break too with all campus libraries closed for the public holiday. See our opening hours for more information.

With the library closed make the most of your Australia Day this year by hanging out in the kitchen. It is no coincidence that your nice and cool fridge happens to be there too!

Here are our top 5 suggestions for having a delicious Australia Day –

  1. Who doesn’t love a barbeque? Do it a little different this year and check out Asian-Style Grilling.
  2. The Foodie’s Beer Book : The Art of Pairing and Cooking with Beer for Any Occasion, is sure to have some great tips and tricks to keep your day full of fun, not to mention yum!
  3. Don’t know how to cook? We have you covered with The “I Don’t Know How to Cook” Book : 300 Great Recipes You Can’t Mess Up!
  4. Simply Smoothies has 200 recipes and easily shows you how to make the perfect Australia Day smoothie to cool you down.
  5. And for desert ice cream sandwiches are the way to go! Try Cookies & Cream : Hundreds of Ways to Make the Perfect Ice Cream Sandwich.

If these suggestions don’t tickle your fancy, there are many more possibilities. QUT has lots of eBooks and videos that can help give you some inspiration for your Australia Day. Enjoy the public holiday and we look forward to seeing you back at QUT Library soon!

One Librarian One Reference – Wikipedia and Librarians

Whether or not you use it, Wikipedia is a wealth of knowledge and information on just about every aspect of the world we live in, from the composition of an atom to the synopsis of your favourite television program. Students are often warned about citing Wikipedia in an academic setting because entries are created and edited by you, the user, which means anyone could create an unreliable entry which could be mistaken as fact. Anyone familiar with the internet would consider it dangerous to trust a source of information created by a group of anonymous users however Wikipedia has garnered for itself a reputation for being the first point-of-call for many knowledge seekers.

In the age of fake news, how can I tell Wikipedia is accurate?

Take a look at this article for some tips on how to tell if the wiki page you are reading is a reliable source of information. One of the first things you should do is check the citations of the article which are the little blue numbers which appear above a sentence in Wikipedia. The number will lead you to the source of the information cited in the article. If the article is credible, the information will be from an academic journal or other reliable source. QUT Library’s Finding Information page has some helpful resources to help you evaluate online sources.

How are Librarians helping the cause?

This is where the hashtag #1lib1ref comes in – this is a worldwide initiative where librarians (and you!) come together to edit Wikipedia pages by searching for uncited statements and adding a citation using a reliable source. You can read more about it on the WikiMedia page.