Over Uni? Try OverDrive

Remember what it was like to just read for enjoyment?  With this year’s study, assignments and exams in the rearview mirror for many of us – it’s time to get back into the art of reading for fun.


QUT’s OverDrive collection of fiction and non-fiction ebooks and audiobooks is ever expanding and ready for you to devour over the holidays.  The collection includes some of the most popular fiction titles and the classics, to the latest cook books and travel guides.

It’s easy and it’s free:

Download to your mobile device:

  1. Download the OverDrive app via Google Play or the App Store.
  2. Sign up for an OverDrive account or log in with your Facebook.
  3. Under Manage libraries select Queensland University of Technology and then sign in with your QUT username and password.

Download to your computer:

https://qut.overdrive.com/

You can also use the OverDrive app to borrow from Brisbane City Council libraries if you are a member.

Referencing Hack #7 – Referencing work quoted by someone else with QUT APA

Referencing an author you read quoted in a book or article by a completely different author can be tricky. Ideally you should find the original source of the quotation but this may not always be possible. But if you can’t, no worries, QUT Library is here to help with our next Referencing Hack!

To reference an author quoted in another work in your reference list, you only need to provide a reference for the source you actually read. This is known as the “secondary source” because it is one step removed from the original source of the idea or quotation. Don’t reference the original source if you haven’t read it yourself, this is a big referencing no-no. In the text of your assignment you need to cite the original author but add the prefix “as cited in” along with the citation for the secondary source after the original authors surname.

Here is an example of how to reference this type of information in the text of your assignment –

Image of an example in text citation. The example is a short quote that reads, according to Rowling open round bracket as cited in Jones 2015 page 301 close round bracket, the Dursleys were open quotation mark were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. Close quotation mark.

The secondary source is Jones (the text you actually read) so Jones is the resource that will appear in the reference list.

For your reference list only include the secondary source information, like so –

Image of an example of an entry in a reference list. The example is author of work which is Jones, F. Year of publication which is Open bracket 2015 close bracket. Title of book which is Juxtapositions of magic and suburbia in late twentieth century fiction. Place of publication which is New York, New York. Publisher which is Powell.

Check QUT Cite|Write APA for how to reference a book, journal article or other types of sources your secondary source might be. Plus you can find more information about referencing authors quoted in another author’s other work in QUT Cite|Write. Just go to the bottom of the page under “need help with” and look for further information on Authors.

Don’t forget to check out our other Referencing Hacks for help with your referencing! Or contact us for further assistance.

Information Searching #3 – Lexis Advance

For those who have to do legal research you may be familiar with Lexis Advance, previously known as Lexis Nexis. Legal research can be a daunting prospect but Lexis Advance’s new design has lots of handy little tricks that can give you a leg up on your legal research. Here are our Law Librarians top tips for getting started with Lexis Advance.

  1. Advanced Search – This is where all the old search forms from Lexis Nexis have gone including Cases and Legislation. These advanced search forms allow you make your search more specific. For example you can search for cases related to a provision of legislation or for legislation that contains a defined term. 
  2. Analytical Materials – This is what all secondary sources in Lexis Advanced are called and this includes dictionaries, encyclopaedias, journal articles and commentaries. Use the Advanced Search form for Analytical Material to search throughout all secondary sources. Or locate the full list of Analytical Materials for Australia by selecting the Browse button at the top of the screen > Publications > Australia > By Content Type > AU Analytical Materials. 
  3. Search Everything – This button is located next to the main, red search box and is very powerful! If you click on it options appear for narrowing your search. This includes jurisdictions and content such as cases, legislation, analytical materials and forms and precedents. You can also narrow by legal topics and any recent publication or searches you have looked at. 
  4. Favourites – Add your most used searches or publications to your favourites box so you can easily access them. This is one of the best parts about Lexis Advance! You can do this by clicking the star next to the publication title either when in the publication itself or by looking at the Recent & Favourites tab under the Search Everything button. Once the star is yellow it’s a favourite, yay! And you can access it from the home page of Lexis Advance.

For more assistance with legal research pop into the Gardens Point Law Library on Level 5 of C Block or contact us! 

Referencing Hacks #6 – Numbered Images

Numbered referencing can be one tough cookie to crack. One particular question we get asked a lot is how to reference an image taken from the internet using QUT Numbered referencing. Have no fear! We have consulted the experts and this is the template we recommend.

[number] Author. Title of image [image on the Internet]. Date [cited date]. Available from: URL

Don’t have all of these pieces of information for your image? Here are some handy hints on how to navigate this.

  • No author? Check for an organisation or corporate author. If still none, omit this information
  • No date? Replace this section with [date unknown].
  • No title? Write a brief description of the image in square brackets and put this where the title would be.

Of course this only makes sense with some examples. Have a look at these to get more of an idea of what your numbered reference should look like for an image.

[1] Breath in cold air [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/breathing1.jpg

[2] Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Shingles on face [image on the Internet]. 2011 [cited 2017 Aug 22]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/photos.html

[3] Wisegeek. [Exterior view of ear with dry skin] [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-do-i-treat-dry-skin-in-the-ears.htm#

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.

Finding Information #1 – Quickfind Advanced Search

Did you know that QUT Library’s Quickfind searches over 80% of all the resources available at QUT? If you are looking for a book, journal article, report or newspaper article this is a great first place to look!

Quickfind’s Advanced Search can help you find information you need efficiently. You can find the Advanced Search underneath the Quickfind Search Bar.

QUT Library Homepage with advanced search icon highlighted.

Once you are in the Advance Search screen type your keywords into the search boxes. To search efficiently, put each concept or keyword on a different line and choose the right Search Operators to separate the lines. After you’ve entered your keywords you can refine your results further by selecting certain publication years to look at or by choosing the content type you want to focus on, such as articles or books. Advanced Search also allows you to select peer reviewed sources as another option to refine your results. By refining your search using the Advanced Search you will save time and get to relevant results faster, woo!

Here are our top tips to get the most out of advanced searches –

  1. Speak the database’s language. Figure out your keywords and synonyms first and how link them with search operators used by the database so it can understand exactly what you are looking for.
  2. Look for ‘search tips’ or ‘help’ buttons within the database to identify your database’s preferred search operators.
  3. Don’t be afraid to change your search strategy. Look in your results for other keywords or synonyms you can use and try different keywords and combinations.
  4. Try new things. Change the field you are searching in. If you are getting too many results from searching All Fields, try searching for your keywords just within the abstract, or look for a particular author.

Contact your information experts for more assistance with using Quickfind’s Advanced Search.

Referencing Hack #5 – Legal Dictionaries

Legal referencing can be tricky. One question the library sees often is how to cite a legal dictionary. After collaborating with law academics this is what we suggest when referencing an online legal dictionary with QUT Legal

Your footnote must contain:

1. Name of the publisher, title of the legal dictionary, (date of last update of the defined term or if that is not available then date of retrieval preceded by ‘at’), ‘name of defined term’ (name of related area of law) [pinpoint reference as a paragraph number, if one exists].

Here is our example –

  1. LexisNexis, Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary (at 9 August 2016), ‘Council’ (Environment) [1].

Is this how you cite a printed legal dictionary too, you ask? For paper legal dictionaries cite according to AGLC3 as if it was a book. And remember to always keep an eye on your punctuation.

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Winter is here and so is Week One

Although Week One can seem dark and full of terrors it doesn’t have it to be. With some help from QUT Library you can start this semester with confidence and the right tools to succeed.

Here are some of our top tips for getting started on the right foot this semester.

  1. Check out our online learning modules about referencing and finding information. These will help you get on track for your assignments and start the semester well ahead of the White Walkers.
  2. Make sure to stay on top of your readings. Do this by being organised and reading efficiently for university. Top tip – you don’t have to read every word. Our previous blog, Reading at University, gives great advice so you don’t spend your semester swamped by Lannister enemies or in in your readings.
  3. Find your prescribed textbooks at the Library. Search our Classic Catalogue for a unit number to find its prescribed texts. Can’t find an available copy? Request a copy of the book by placing a hold on it or see if it is available through our BONUS+ Catalogue. You could also look for an earlier edition, although make sure to check that the information in the older book is still current and accurate.
  4. And finally, make sure to say hi to the friendly staff at HiQ. They can provide support for all your university needs such as library assistance, IT support and student administration. Unlike Jon Snow, they know a lot!

So start your semester off with a bang, figuratively not Cersei literally, and visit QUT Library.

O Week – What’s happening in the library?

Welcome!

QUT Library offers a range of orientation activities to help you prepare for Semester 2, whether you are new to QUT or returning for another semester.

Library Tours

This tour is much more than a walk around a building because QUT Library is so much more than just a building! Your Library has study spaces, services, resources and people to help you, both at your campus and online. During O Week, library tours are held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove. Tours depart from HiQ at:

  • 10am
  • 11am
  • 12pm
  • 1pm
  • 2pm

Referencing made simple

Referencing is an important skill that you must use at uni. This session introduces you to the principles and styles of referencing and citing using QUT cite|write. It also explains how you can paraphrase the work of others, avoid plagiarism, and make sure that your work has academic integrity.

Researching made easy

It’s easy to find information but getting the best scholarly information quickly is a skill. After this session, you will use databases more efficiently to find relevant information and current journal articles for your assignments.

Kelvin Grove Library

We look forward to welcoming you to QUT Library for Semester 2 and if you need help please contact us.

For more information about O Week, check out QUT orientation for students

Exam Preparation 101

Exams are just around the corner. To get you through this semester we have put together our top tips for surviving exams.

  1. Have a look at the Exam Preparation page. There is lots of useful information here including understanding your type be that multiple choice, short answer or essay exams .
  2. See if there any past exams available for your units. If there aren’t any available have a look at some of the library’s Test Taking Skills And remember to practice, practice, and practice some more!
  3. Check your Blackboard site to see if your lecturer or tutor has provided any tips for your exam. What will it cover? How long will it go for? What format will it be? Any information you can get about your exam is good information.
  4. Exams can be stressful but you can manage your exam stress. And if you need some assistance with this, QUT Counselling Services are available.
  5. Find your perfect nook! QUT Gardens Point Library will open with extended opening hours from the 2nd June – 23rd Each night the Gardens Point Library will be open until 2am, plenty of time for you to find the perfect place to study for your exams.

And finally, from all of us at QUT Library, good luck!