SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize now open to Q1 + Q2 journals

The SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize has been extended to include Q1 and Q2 Scimago ranked journals. Higher Degree Research (HDR) students who are the lead author on a paper that has been published in a peer reviewed journal with a Q1 or Q2 ranking in Scimago, can enter the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize.

Three prizes are up for grabs: first prize $1500; second $900 and; third prize $500. A panel of five will evaluate the papers entered based on originality and readability (writing style and clarity).Don’t miss this opportunity to be recognised for your research and writing skills.

To enter you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) or Quartile 2 (Q2) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

You’ve already done the hard work of writing and publishing the paper, enter now with the chance to further highlight your research!

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information, contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Open science, open data – the World Science Festival Brisbane

“It’s not enough to do it; it must be communicated” – Virginia Barbour, Executive Director, Australasian Open Access Strategy Group, on a key concept in science.

Providing open access to research, including publications, data, software, methodologies and all other research outputs, is a growing worldwide initiative, as is the drive to solve real-world problems and stimulate innovation.  The lack of access to research publications and their accompanying data is inhibiting national and international collaboration, public debate and research, however, times are changing.

Originally applied only to data, the F.A.I.R. principles now apply to all research outputs, as proposed at a November 2016 meeting of the G20 Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers Meeting.  Research findings that are F.A.I.R. are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable.

“With F.A.I.R. access, Australian research will be more visible, the broader community will have better access to well-founded knowledge, Australian researchers will be able to more easily collaborate locally and globally, including with industry, and the Australian research enterprise will be more accountable to the community it serves” – F.A.I.R. Access Working Group

Dr Salvatore Mele from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports that research in the field of physics has always been openly available, with researchers posting each other hard copies of publications that were submitted for review.  During the World Science Festival, which is being held in Brisbane from 22-26 March, the world-renowned Large Hadron Collider will be on display at the Queensland Museum.

Managed by CERN, the data collected from use of the Collider are published in the CERN Open Data Portal, and are accompanied by the software and documentation required to make sense of the data being shared.  Here at QUT, researchers can publish their data and accompanying material through our data repository, Research Data Finder.  We’re doing our bit to accelerate open science by providing access to open data!

Take a look at datasets that have already been added, including ‘Fusion transcripts in prostate cancer using RNA sequences derived from Australian and Chinese men’ by Dr Jyotsna Batra and Dr John Lai, and perhaps add one of your own at QUT Research Data Finder.

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize 2017

SAGE is offering cash prizes ($1500 First Prize, $900 Second Prize and $500 Third Prize) for the top three papers, accepted for publication, by a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student. You have until 14th September 2017 to enter, so sharpen those pencils! The awards will go to HDR students who are the lead author on a manuscript judged to be among the top three papers, and accepted by a peer reviewed journal, with a Q1 ranking in Scimago.  The paper must have been accepted between the 1st January 2017 and the 31st of August 2017.

To be eligible to enter, you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Some of this information has changed. Please see here for more current information.

NEW: Sage Research Methods Video: Now on trial until May 5th

SAGE Research Methods Video has over 480 videos, including hours of tutorials, expert interviews, video case studies and mini-documentaries covering the entire research process.

Instead of reading about it, see research design and method in action! Search by type of method, professional discipline, or video type. Videos will help to bring methods to life. Stimulate class discussions by assigning videos for pre-class viewing, or use a clip in class to provide an alternative viewpoint. Videos can also be embedded into course management systems for exam preparation. Whether you are learning, doing, supervising or teaching. Students, academics and professionals can find extra help and support, to guide them through every step of their research project, or to succeed in their research methods course.

Is this something you wish to have in our collection or have a say on? Please review the resources and provide feedback here. For questions, please contact your Liaison librarian.

Who has been talking about your research? Altmetric Explorer knows.


Navigate the brave new world of alternative metrics (altmetrics) with Altmetric Explorer.

While traditional, citation-based metrics can take a significant amount of time to indicate the impact of research, altmetrics, that measure online attention, can give researchers a real-time indication of who is taking an interest in their research.

QUT researchers can now see who is talking about their research, and where.  Altmetric Explorer aggregates mentions of their works in a number of sources, including news outlets, blogs, policy documents, social media and Wikipedia, to calculate an ‘Attention Score’.  This is represented by a multi-coloured ‘doughnut’, where each colour corresponds to a type of source; the more colourful the doughnut the wider the reach.

You can use Altmetric Explorer to explore QUT’s publication data, or all research in the Altmetric database. Search by article title, keyword, researcher name, QUT faculty or school.  Currently, Altmetric Explorer only tracks QUT articles with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).  Register for an account in Altmetrics Explorer to access extra features.  So get ready to explore Altmetric Explorer and find out the colour of your ‘doughnut’. If you have any questions please contact your Liaison Librarian or Library Research Support.

Love Your Data Week 2017

From the 13th to the 17th of February, along with other academic and research libraries, data archives and organisations, QUT Library is celebrating the value and importance of research data, which are (we believe) crucial for advancing our knowledge of the world around us.

The theme for the 2017 social media event is ‘data quality’ and each day focuses on a different aspect of research data management:

13 February – Defining data quality

14 February – Documenting, describing, defining

15 February – Good data examples

16 February – Finding the right data

17 February – Rescuing unloved data

QUT researchers are also getting into the swing of things!  Here’s what Associate Professor Adrian Barnett from the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health has to say about issues he’s faced in the research data management process:

“A huge issue is data access. I’ve seen PhDs and postdocs ruined because individuals and groups won’t release or share data, even though it’s almost always data collected from the public and the goal of the research is always to improve public health. And oftentimes, the groups are doing nothing with the data, they just don’t want to share it just in case.

People also wear themselves out collecting too much data. At the project design stage, there’s often a lot of thought that a particular variable or new data source would be great to collect. If multiple people with different “pet” variables are involved, the data collection becomes massive and eats all of the project budget and time. An analysis is then hastily done because there’s no time or energy left. Answering a few questions well is the better option than answering a lot of questions badly.”

Dr Tony Beatton, a researcher from the School of Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business who’s completing a PhD on the economics of happiness and whose research is founded on the application of primary-source datasets to has this to say:

“Given clean, accurate data, a researcher can look for patterns that explain human behaviour.  To do this, we need:

  1. A desire to use data as the basis for examining research questions;
  2. Access to quality data, which the QUT library certainly enables;
  3. Technical skills in mathematics and statistics, which enable us to;
  4. Apply the data plus our technical skills and knowledge of the literatures to examine important research questions.

The truth is in the numbers which manifest in the data.”

If you’re a researcher, leave a comment below on your experience with data, or any tips, tricks and resources that you wished someone had shared with you!

Visit the Love Your Data blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation or to view more, go to Twitter (#LYD17, #loveyourdata), Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

Get your Research on at ResBaz!

Kickstart your research in 2017 with the Research Bazaar (ResBaz). It is on in Brisbane again this year and is hosted by The University of Queensland. ResBaz is an international festival celebrating digital literacies that are the foundation of modern research. It facilitates collaboration between early career researchers, PhD students, and researchers at other stages of their career using the next generation of digital research tools. You can learn from peers about the digital skills needed for cutting edge research in the 21st century!

There are several events happening in Brisbane throughout ResBaz including a Festival Day and a variety of workshops. Some of the information shared will be about OpenRefine and Web scrapers, bioinformatics as well as some Software Carpentry lessons.

For those able to get to Brisbane the details are as follows –

Where: University of Queensland, St Lucia campus (Advanced Engineering Building)

When: 7-9 February, 2017.

What: ResBaz includes several events and workshops. Registration for the market day is available and recommended. Registration for the workshops is essential.

For those who can’t to get to Brisbane, don’t worry! ResBaz is an international event and hosted in other locations around the globe so you can find a ResBaz location near you.

Can’t make it toResBaz? No worries, QUT Library offers research support to students. Check out QUT Library’s resources for researchers and the training and assistance we offer to all Higher Degree Research Students, other researchers and research support staff.

Open Access Week 2016: Open in Action

2016 International Open Access Week is celebrated from 24 – 28 October. You might ask, what is open access and why is it important? Open Access (OA) material is freely accessible to everyone and is important in allowing equitable access to research.  Open access can give researchers and students in developing countries access to information that they would otherwise not be able to afford.  It is also important because it takes your research to a much wider audience and makes it easier for other researchers to find and cite.

This year the focus is on Open in Action and how we as researchers, librarians and students can become more familiar with open access. We can do this by focusing on the small steps everyone can take to make openness in research a reality.

QUT will be hosting two events in International Open Access Week that will showcase these actions, the researchers who are leading by example, and the ways openness advances research and scholarship.

Register now to join us at these events and discover how you can become part of the open access movement.

Open in action: Skill exchange
Tuesday 25 October
2:00 – 4:00pm
IHBI Seminar Room, KG-Q430
Kelvin Grove
Register online now

This workshop provides an opportunity for QUT staff and HDR students to learn more about how to utilise open access in their research. Experts will give short presentations on topics ranging from scholarly publishing and applying licences to research outputs. Participants will then have the opportunity to share their skills and knowledge with their colleagues.  Light afternoon tea provided.

Open in action: Making openness in research a reality
Wednesday 26 October
2:00 – 4:00pm
The Gibson Room, GP-Z1064
Gardens Point
Register online now

All researchers at QUT will benefit from hearing from academics from QUT, Griffith, and UQ provide insight into why they incorporate open access into their research practice. They will also discuss the practicalities of open data and open access publishing for researchers. Light afternoon tea provided.

Contact Library Research Support for more information.

 

Play, Learn, Win, Take the Engineering Academic Challenge!

ad_eac_235Engage in real world contemporary engineering problem solving!

Do you have the urge to test your mettle against other students from around the globe? Then join the Engineering Academic Challenge, compete against thousands of engineering students from hundreds of institutions around the globe!

The prestigious worldwide Engineering Academic Challenge starts October 10th. Over five weeks contestants use QUT Library’s Knovel and the Engineering Village database Compendex to answer five real world questions about trending engineering topics to win great prizes.

The Engineering Academic Challenge has been created by Drexel University College of Engineering students; for students. Challenge problem sets are based around five themes –

  1. Sustainable Energy
  2. Connectivity for 21st Century
  3. Making (Future Manufacturing)
  4. Future of Medicine
  5. Future of Transport

Solving the themed problems will challenge and extend you. Develop, test and measure innovative solutions. Teams and / or individuals can take part. Students from any discipline are welcome to participate. To accept the challenge register now online.

Begins Monday 10th October and end Sunday 13th November. For more information visit Engineering Academic Challenge.

Bring out your data

Bring out your DATA to make your research datasets reusable, visible, discoverable and citable. Archiving and safely securely storing your data are important established steps in the scholarly communication process; increasingly, publishing and sharing your data is too.. Depositing data in QUT’s Research Data Finder is now easier than ever.

Publishing and sharing your research data, under a Creative Commons licence, is good practice and has benefits for you as a researcher since it enables you to get credit for your datasets.  Many funders now have data sharing requirements and, increasingly, journals and publishers have a data sharing policy. QUT supports researchers in securely storing and safely sharing research datasets.

Research Data Finder has a new look and increased functionality. It now contains over 230 records of research datasets. Examples include:

Sharing research data or information about data (metadata) can unlock opportunities for you as a researcher and can help drive innovation. QUT’s Management of Research Data policy encourages open data practices at QUT wherever possible, as there are many benefits to researchers and universities.

Contact the Research Data Librarian for more information on using Research Data Finder and the University Copyright Officer for information on licencing your dataset.