QUT helps break down the digital divide

Knowledge Unlatched logoIn 2014, QUT signed up as a founding member of a global initiative called Knowledge Unlatched (KU) which unites the two approaches of crowd-funding and Open Access to support the publication of specialist scholarly books.   Digital copies of the books supported by KU can be freely accessed by anyone in the world via OAPEN, HathiTrust and the British Library.  Libraries can include the books in their collections free of charge.

Frances Pinter, the Embassador/Founder of KU, says that the approach “ensures that in the digital world we are not just replicating the old print model, but that we can indeed do better and contribute to breaking down what is fast becoming a new digital divide.”

Frances Pinter will be giving a talk at the State Library of Queensland on Thursday 23 November 2017, 2:00pm – 3.00pm :

“Transforming publishing — issues around policy, funding and publishing”

Register for this free event here.

Contact Paula Callan, Scholarly Communications Librarian, for further details.

Why Open Access is so important?

As students, researchers and staff at QUT we go about our studies, research and work often not really thinking about where our information and resources for assignments and research come from. In many cases it’s not until we have trouble with a link to a full-text journal article that we even consider the prospect of not being able to access what we are looking for.  We take it for granted that if we can’t access that article, we can get someone at the library to find it for us, or we can use the library’s document delivery service to have the article sent directly to us.

But what if we didn’t have such easy access to articles, what if we had to pay every time we clicked on the full text link? Well, the simple answer is we do pay; QUT Library provides access to subscriptions to the world’s top academic journals and databases to ensure that we have the best and latest research available at our fingertips.  Most of these articles sit behind a pay wall and aren’t open access.

The main argument for open access to scholarly publishing is that if most research is undertaken by publically funded universities (like QUT), why then should those same institutions then have to pay again, at the library level, to access that research?   And why should this information only be shared with others who can pay for it?  The restrictive practices in traditional academic publishing constrain the growth, reach, visibility, accessibility and impact of information.   This not only stifles innovation and world knowledge, it limits the contribution to research by developing countries who can’t afford subscription costs.

Open Access is important because it benefits everyone. From researchers whose work benefits through increased collaboration and sharing, to communities who benefit from the accelerated pace of discovery.

QUT has been a key innovator in advocating for open access and was the first university to mandate open access to its scholarly work in 2003. QUT’s ePrints is the highest ranked Australian repository  according to Webometrics.  QUT also  hosts the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) which works across the region to advocate, collaborate, raise awareness, and help build capacity in open access. Creative Commons Australia is also based at QUT and provides free licences and tools that copyright owners can use to allow others to share, reuse and remix their material, legally.  QUT library, the AOASG and Creative Commons Australia can provide advice to QUT researchers on all aspects of open access.

During International Open Access week (23-29th Oct) QUT Library will be hosting a number of events and is delighted Heather Joseph, the Executive Director of Scholarly Publishing and Research Coalition (SPARC), an important US based advocacy group will be visiting QUT.

Monday 23rd Oct  2-4pm  – Open Access Bizarre Bazaar – GP-Z1064

Tuesday 24th Oct 1-3pm – Wikipedia Editing Workshop – KG Library

Wednesday 25th Oct 8:15-10am – Brisbane Tri-University event 

Friday 27th Oct 10-11:30am – The Power of Open: International Policy and Practice with Heather Joseph from SPARC – GP-Z1064

 

 

 

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.

Choose the right journal for your research via Think Check Submit

Quality is key to selecting the right journal to publish in and avoiding predatory publisher traps can be difficult.  In response to the problems of deceptive journals and conferences, a collection of publishers, publishing ethics groups, open access groups and academic libraries created Think Check Submit.

The campaign helps researchers identify trusted journals for their research via a simple checklist to assess the credentials of a journal or publisher.

Start the check by asking yourself some questions including:

  • Do you or your colleagues know the journal?
    – Have you read any articles in the journal before?
    – Is it easy to discover the latest papers in the journal?
  • Is the journal clear about the type of peer review it uses?
  • Are articles indexed in services that you use?

Watch the short video for more details:

.

Think Check Submit is now available in seventeen languages including Arabic, Chinese, Indonesian, Spanish and Thai.

Want to know more about how to choose journals to publish in?  Contact your Liaison Librarian and check out the Which journal? advice from QUT Library.

Finding Information #1 – Quickfind Advanced Search

Did you know that QUT Library’s Quickfind searches over 80% of all the resources available at QUT? If you are looking for a book, journal article, report or newspaper article this is a great first place to look!

Quickfind’s Advanced Search can help you find information you need efficiently. You can find the Advanced Search underneath the Quickfind Search Bar.

QUT Library Homepage with advanced search icon highlighted.

Once you are in the Advance Search screen type your keywords into the search boxes. To search efficiently, put each concept or keyword on a different line and choose the right Search Operators to separate the lines. After you’ve entered your keywords you can refine your results further by selecting certain publication years to look at or by choosing the content type you want to focus on, such as articles or books. Advanced Search also allows you to select peer reviewed sources as another option to refine your results. By refining your search using the Advanced Search you will save time and get to relevant results faster, woo!

Here are our top tips to get the most out of advanced searches –

  1. Speak the database’s language. Figure out your keywords and synonyms first and how link them with search operators used by the database so it can understand exactly what you are looking for.
  2. Look for ‘search tips’ or ‘help’ buttons within the database to identify your database’s preferred search operators.
  3. Don’t be afraid to change your search strategy. Look in your results for other keywords or synonyms you can use and try different keywords and combinations.
  4. Try new things. Change the field you are searching in. If you are getting too many results from searching All Fields, try searching for your keywords just within the abstract, or look for a particular author.

Contact your information experts for more assistance with using Quickfind’s Advanced Search.

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize now open to Q1 + Q2 journals

The SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize has been extended to include Q1 and Q2 Scimago ranked journals. Higher Degree Research (HDR) students who are the lead author on a paper that has been published in a peer reviewed journal with a Q1 or Q2 ranking in Scimago, can enter the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize.

Three prizes are up for grabs: first prize $1500; second $900 and; third prize $500. A panel of five will evaluate the papers entered based on originality and readability (writing style and clarity).Don’t miss this opportunity to be recognised for your research and writing skills.

To enter you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) or Quartile 2 (Q2) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

You’ve already done the hard work of writing and publishing the paper, enter now with the chance to further highlight your research!

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information, contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Open science, open data – the World Science Festival Brisbane

“It’s not enough to do it; it must be communicated” – Virginia Barbour, Executive Director, Australasian Open Access Strategy Group, on a key concept in science.

Providing open access to research, including publications, data, software, methodologies and all other research outputs, is a growing worldwide initiative, as is the drive to solve real-world problems and stimulate innovation.  The lack of access to research publications and their accompanying data is inhibiting national and international collaboration, public debate and research, however, times are changing.

Originally applied only to data, the F.A.I.R. principles now apply to all research outputs, as proposed at a November 2016 meeting of the G20 Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers Meeting.  Research findings that are F.A.I.R. are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable.

“With F.A.I.R. access, Australian research will be more visible, the broader community will have better access to well-founded knowledge, Australian researchers will be able to more easily collaborate locally and globally, including with industry, and the Australian research enterprise will be more accountable to the community it serves” – F.A.I.R. Access Working Group

Dr Salvatore Mele from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports that research in the field of physics has always been openly available, with researchers posting each other hard copies of publications that were submitted for review.  During the World Science Festival, which is being held in Brisbane from 22-26 March, the world-renowned Large Hadron Collider will be on display at the Queensland Museum.

Managed by CERN, the data collected from use of the Collider are published in the CERN Open Data Portal, and are accompanied by the software and documentation required to make sense of the data being shared.  Here at QUT, researchers can publish their data and accompanying material through our data repository, Research Data Finder.  We’re doing our bit to accelerate open science by providing access to open data!

Take a look at datasets that have already been added, including ‘Fusion transcripts in prostate cancer using RNA sequences derived from Australian and Chinese men’ by Dr Jyotsna Batra and Dr John Lai, and perhaps add one of your own at QUT Research Data Finder.

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize 2017

SAGE is offering cash prizes ($1500 First Prize, $900 Second Prize and $500 Third Prize) for the top three papers, accepted for publication, by a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student. You have until 14th September 2017 to enter, so sharpen those pencils! The awards will go to HDR students who are the lead author on a manuscript judged to be among the top three papers, and accepted by a peer reviewed journal, with a Q1 ranking in Scimago.  The paper must have been accepted between the 1st January 2017 and the 31st of August 2017.

To be eligible to enter, you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Some of this information has changed. Please see here for more current information.

NEW: Sage Research Methods Video: Now on trial until May 5th

SAGE Research Methods Video has over 480 videos, including hours of tutorials, expert interviews, video case studies and mini-documentaries covering the entire research process.

Instead of reading about it, see research design and method in action! Search by type of method, professional discipline, or video type. Videos will help to bring methods to life. Stimulate class discussions by assigning videos for pre-class viewing, or use a clip in class to provide an alternative viewpoint. Videos can also be embedded into course management systems for exam preparation. Whether you are learning, doing, supervising or teaching. Students, academics and professionals can find extra help and support, to guide them through every step of their research project, or to succeed in their research methods course.

Is this something you wish to have in our collection or have a say on? Please review the resources and provide feedback here. For questions, please contact your Liaison librarian.

Who has been talking about your research? Altmetric Explorer knows.


Navigate the brave new world of alternative metrics (altmetrics) with Altmetric Explorer.

While traditional, citation-based metrics can take a significant amount of time to indicate the impact of research, altmetrics, that measure online attention, can give researchers a real-time indication of who is taking an interest in their research.

QUT researchers can now see who is talking about their research, and where.  Altmetric Explorer aggregates mentions of their works in a number of sources, including news outlets, blogs, policy documents, social media and Wikipedia, to calculate an ‘Attention Score’.  This is represented by a multi-coloured ‘doughnut’, where each colour corresponds to a type of source; the more colourful the doughnut the wider the reach.

You can use Altmetric Explorer to explore QUT’s publication data, or all research in the Altmetric database. Search by article title, keyword, researcher name, QUT faculty or school.  Currently, Altmetric Explorer only tracks QUT articles with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).  Register for an account in Altmetrics Explorer to access extra features.  So get ready to explore Altmetric Explorer and find out the colour of your ‘doughnut’. If you have any questions please contact your Liaison Librarian or Library Research Support.