You Go Geek Girl!

Today is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

A little over two years ago,  in a bid to achieve full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls and further achieve gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/70/212 declaring 11 February as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

QUT Library proudly supports this day and to celebrate we’ve put together a few nice reads and some films to watch to get your Geek Girl on.


If you’re looking for a new squad, check out Leslie Simon’s Geek girls unite: how fangirls, bookworms, indie chicks, and other misfits are taking over the world.  With illustrations by Nan Lawson.

If you’ve got a thing for young adult literature, or a budding geek girl in your life, you might try the bestselling and award winning Geek Girl series by Holly Smale.

It was a book before it was a movie!  Hidden Figures:  The American dream and the untold story of the Black women mathematicians who helped win the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly.

Ladies in the laboratory III: South African, Australian, New Zealand, and Canadian women in science, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries : a survey of their contributions  The women whose lives and work are discussed here range from natural history collectors and scientific illustrators of the early and mid-years of the 19th century to the first generation of graduates of the new colonial colleges and universities, by Mary R S Creese.



Academic Women in STEM Faculty: Views  beyond a decade after POWRE  This eBook looks at the major issues facing successful women in academic science, by Sue Rosser.


The Hidden Figures DVD:  As the US raced against Russia to put a man in space, NASA found untapped talent in a group of African-American female mathematicians that served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in U.S. history. Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson crossed all gender, race, and professional lines while their brilliance and desire to dream big in this 2016 movie.

These short and inspiring videos from the United Nations:

The story of Katherine Jin a young female scientist, her initial struggle to take part in science, and how her invention helps safeguard health workers. YouTube 3.53min.

Technology empowering women – Why the world needs women in technology – Atefeh Riaiazi YouTube 2.56min




Key technology tools for your IT Business Research

10 years ago when the iPhone was launched, the era of smartphones were just dawning. In 2005 most people received their news via radio, TV or Blackberries. Today most of us look first to our smart phones for information and if our phone is not to hand, we are at a loss and wonder what is going on in the world.

Those who analyse business trends love the Wayne Gretzky (Ice Hockey player) quote and Steve Jobs, at the end of the original iPhone launch couldn’t resist either: “Skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been”.

Indeed the holy grail of business analysis is predicting the path innovation will take and the speed at which it will move.

Sometimes it is a case of blink and technology overtakes you. (Just ask Nokia 🙂 )

So how to obtain a bleeding edge insight into today’s technology to predict future innovation trends?

Gartner has tools to frame information into visually concise evidence of current market conditions and future directions.

Gartner’s hype cycles graphically display the lifecycle of a technology and provides reference points as to where each company is located within that lifecycle.Use hype cycles to remove the hysteria of a technology’s popular value and instead discover its true commercial potential.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrants are visualization tools based on research, which positions companies within their market place and aligns them with their competitors.

Use Magic Quadrants to get quickly educated about a market’s technology providers, their competitive positioning and the strategies they are using to via for end-user business.

For more help contact HiQ


Australia Day Opening Hours

HiQ and QUT Library will be open on the Australia Day Public Holiday this Friday.

Gardens Point Library will be open 9am to 5pm and Kelvin Grove Library will be open 1pm to 5pm. QUT Law Library will be closed for Australia Day, while Online Chat will be available from 9am to 5pm. For more information please see our opening hours.

Looking for something to do this Australia Day?

You might like to explore QUT Library’s broad selection of ebooks and online videos while you relax and enjoy this public holiday.

If you’re feeling more studious, you might prefer to brush up on your software and skills in IT, design and business with QUT Library’s subscription to This database provides online training videos and tutorials on course topics including office applications, 3D animation, audio engineering, CAD, software development, photography, video editing, and web design.

Christmas Break & the Library

Christmas and New Year are just around the corner. From the 23rd December until the 1st of January QUT Library is having a Christmas break and will be closed. But even though our libraries at Caboolture, Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point will be closed during this time you can still access many library resources online.

If you need to do some research, jump on the Library’s Website and search through Quickfind. Or search a database for your subject area by selecting looking under Databases and specialised search tools.

Not sure how to find the information you need? Have a look at our handy how to find guides to find the right database or website for your research.  You can also find online videos to watch at home and see what eBooks you can read right from the comfort of your home or at the beach!

And if you need further assistance, HiQ’s Contact Center will be available at the following times –

23 December – 31 December open 10am – 2pm

This excludes 25 & 26 December and the 1st January Public Holidays when HiQ are closed.

HiQ Service Points at Kelvin Grove Library & Gardens Point Library will be back in action on the 2nd January. Until then, from all of QUT Library, we hope you have a safe and happy holiday!

Tom’s Christmas Reading Recommendation

We have said it a few times recently that QUT Library has a whole bunch of Christmas movies and books to get you into the holiday spirit. And it’s still true! Here is another recommendation from Tom to get you inspired to read something festive.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens – available to borrow from QUT Library in print or as an audiobook or eBook

“Marley was dead: to begin with.”

The opening line to possibly the most famous Christmas story of all time is a classic, and one many of us have heard countless times since we were old enough to remember Christmas.  The number of movies, plays, TV episodes, and re-interpretations that have adapted one of Dickens’ most famous stories is immense.  The story, trials, and morals that follow shrewd businessman Ebenezer Scrooge are so ingrained into modern popular culture that there is no point restating the plot here.  Many people are familiar with the tale but how many have actually read the original?  I’m a little ashamed to admit that I did not read A Christmas Carol until well into my twenties.  In fact I’d never read any Dickens.  I was expecting something old and stuffy, written in a style of English that would be difficult for me to comprehend.   But it turns out that Dickens is a master of 19th Century sass.  He spends the first few pages slyly pulling apart the common phrase ‘as dead as door-nail’, feeling that coffin nails should be considered the most deceased types of iron. He has such a wonderful way with words and style, and the rhythm of language that you feel compelled to be drawn along by his prose.  The original novella is such an important part of our current culture of Christmas, and everyone should spend some quality time with it.

What’s your favourite Christmas movie, TV show or book? We want to know! Find us on Facebook, Instagram on Twitter or leave a comment on this blog!

Sue’s Christmas Recommendations

QUT Library has so many Christmas movies, books and TV shows to get you into the festive mood. We have asked some our librarians what their all time favourite Christmas movies and books were. Here is what Sue recommends!

The Polar Express (2005) Available on DVD or online via Click View (QUT Login required)

Continuing our theme of best loved Christmas movies, make sure you get hold of The Polar Express before everyone else does.  Bit of a heads up, though – do yourself a favour and read the original, award winning, children’s picture book  by Chris Van Allsburg first so as to fully appreciate the lavish, darkly-themed artwork that became the inspiration for the movie.

What’s it about? Having reached an age where he doubts that Santa is real, a young boy (we never learn his name) wakes suddenly on Christmas Eve to see a mysterious steam train in the falling snow outside of his bedroom. Imagine his amazement when he realises that the train is waiting for him to board, ready for their journey to the North Pole! This movie is not like other Christmas films.  It has a magical, shadowy quality which characterises it, just like the beautiful full-page illustrations found in the original book.  It is this that appeals to me so strongly.  My children and I enjoyed reading the book together for several years before the movie’s release in 2004 and I was delighted that the film remains so stylistically true to the book’s artwork.

The movie is a 3D animation using motion capture and is entered in the Guinness World Book of Records as being the world’s first all-digital capture film.  The music is amazing, featuring an original score by Alan Silvestri along with many well-loved Christmas favourites.

I would recommend this movie for children aged perhaps 7+ as it may be a bit dark for the littlies.  Having said that, this is a heart-warming, powerful and endearing movie that continues to be a seasonal favourite at our house.

Tom’s Christmas Recommendations

QUT Library has a wealth of Christmas movies, books and TV shows to get you into the festive mood. We have asked some our librarians what their all time favourite Christmas movies and books were. Here is what Tom thinks!

Arthur Christmas (2011)  Available on EduTV via Informit (QUT log in required)

This is the movie that is currently in my ‘must see’ Christmas movie rotation list, and absolutely love showing it to friends that have never seen it before.  Arthur Christmas is a 3D animated film by Aardman Animations (the same folks who brought us Wallace and Gromit) that portrays the legacy of Santa Clause as a very real, and very secret, family business with the title of ‘Santa’ being handed down from father to son for centuries.  The humour is wonderfully British and ranges from the very silly to some darker adult jokes, whilch leads to some great scenes such as an army of elves questioning the existence of children, and a European Union-esque security alliance scrambling predator drones when they mistake Santa’s sleigh as an invading alien spaceship.  The characters are voiced by all of your favourite English actors including James McAvoy, Hugh Laurie, Bill Nighy, Jim Broadbent and Imelda Staunton.  In the end this movie is about family, the spirit of Christmas, keeping tradition, breaking tradition, and wrapping presents with only three bits of tape.

The Snowman (1982) Available to borrow from QUT Library

The Snowman holds a very special place in my childhood, as my family would watch it every Christmas Eve, in the dark, with only the coloured glow of our Christmas tree to light up the room.  It is a gorgeous, animated short film, based on the picture book by Raymond Briggs, which tells the story of a small boy who builds a snowman that comes to life at the stroke of midnight.  They go on a series of small adventures including a magical flight to the North Pole, where they meet Father Christmas at a party full of other living snowmen.  Remarkably, the film is completely wordless and relies on music and animation to tell its story.  It never fails to bring a tear to my eye, especially during the enchanting song “Walking In The Air”, and the tale’s sad and bittersweet ending.  It won a BAFTA and an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. Here is a trailer for one of the more recent sequals to The Snowman, The Snowman & The Snow Dog.

We have even more to recommend so keep an eye out for more blogs with Christmas cheer!


Melbourne Cup Fashion

2013 Myer Fashions on the Field by Chris Phutully available at File:2013_Myer_Fashions_on_the_ Field _(10705478733).jpg (CC BY 2.0)


Celebrate the Melbourne Cup in style on Tuesday 7th November 2017…

Whether you’re studying or interested in fashion, QUT Library has a large number of resources on fashion from which you can draw inspiration.

For more information, check out this library subject guide on fashion.

view databases in the Creative Industries study area – fashion

  • WGSN (Worth Global Style Network)
    A very visual, glossy database for trends and forecasting in fashion. WGSN Insight helps the creative thinkers in fashion stay ahead.
  • Vogue Archive (via ProQuest)
    A complete archive of American Vogue, from the first issue in 1892 to the current month, reproduced in high resolution colour page images.

search for books and ebooks in qut library

find online videos and dvds via the library

Virtual Reality in the Library

QUT Library at Kelvin Grove will be showcasing our Virtual Reality resources during Week 13. Try various VR headsets including Oculus Rift, PlayStation and Voxkin , and discover the wide range of VR content available to you from the Library!

Come and join us in the Games Lab on Level 4 and HiQ Level 2 on Wednesday 25th and Thursday 26th of October between 1pm-3pm.

Can’t make it to the library then? We have you covered! Our Games Lab is open the same time as HiQ so you can pop in and play the PS4 and Xbox One to your hearts content. Plus we have a whole bunch of games available for you to play and borrow.

Hopefully we will see you for some fun with virtual reality or maybe borrowing some games!

Why Open Access is so important?

As students, researchers and staff at QUT we go about our studies, research and work often not really thinking about where our information and resources for assignments and research come from. In many cases it’s not until we have trouble with a link to a full-text journal article that we even consider the prospect of not being able to access what we are looking for.  We take it for granted that if we can’t access that article, we can get someone at the library to find it for us, or we can use the library’s document delivery service to have the article sent directly to us.

But what if we didn’t have such easy access to articles, what if we had to pay every time we clicked on the full text link? Well, the simple answer is we do pay; QUT Library provides access to subscriptions to the world’s top academic journals and databases to ensure that we have the best and latest research available at our fingertips.  Most of these articles sit behind a pay wall and aren’t open access.

The main argument for open access to scholarly publishing is that if most research is undertaken by publically funded universities (like QUT), why then should those same institutions then have to pay again, at the library level, to access that research?   And why should this information only be shared with others who can pay for it?  The restrictive practices in traditional academic publishing constrain the growth, reach, visibility, accessibility and impact of information.   This not only stifles innovation and world knowledge, it limits the contribution to research by developing countries who can’t afford subscription costs.

Open Access is important because it benefits everyone. From researchers whose work benefits through increased collaboration and sharing, to communities who benefit from the accelerated pace of discovery.

QUT has been a key innovator in advocating for open access and was the first university to mandate open access to its scholarly work in 2003. QUT’s ePrints is the highest ranked Australian repository  according to Webometrics.  QUT also  hosts the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) which works across the region to advocate, collaborate, raise awareness, and help build capacity in open access. Creative Commons Australia is also based at QUT and provides free licences and tools that copyright owners can use to allow others to share, reuse and remix their material, legally.  QUT library, the AOASG and Creative Commons Australia can provide advice to QUT researchers on all aspects of open access.

During International Open Access week (23-29th Oct) QUT Library will be hosting a number of events and is delighted Heather Joseph, the Executive Director of Scholarly Publishing and Research Coalition (SPARC), an important US based advocacy group will be visiting QUT.

Monday 23rd Oct  2-4pm  – Open Access Bizarre Bazaar – GP-Z1064

Tuesday 24th Oct 1-3pm – Wikipedia Editing Workshop – KG Library

Wednesday 25th Oct 8:15-10am – Brisbane Tri-University event 

Friday 27th Oct 10-11:30am – The Power of Open: International Policy and Practice with Heather Joseph from SPARC – GP-Z1064