Explore Nearmap

Do you want to see what your house and suburb looked like 10 years ago?

Would you like to put in solar power but are not sure how much electricity you would generate?

Nearmap is a database of high quality aerial photomaps of Australian cities over time. It is highly relevant for Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Civil Engineering and Urban Design. It may also be useful where a visual representation of census data over the map is desired.

Things you can do with Nearmap:

  • Track development of an area over time
  • Calculate solar energy production
  • Observe patterns of shade
  • Measure and mark out boundaries
  • Estimate the volume of pits, mounds and excavations in truckloads or cubic meters
  • See the elevation of bare earth and the actual surface, and details of slope between two points
  • View flood levels

Data layers:

  • Health including adult distress, childhood development, life expectancy
  • Law enforcement by types of crime
  • Property approvals, noise and value
  • Economics including business size, mortgage, income and rent values, and SEIFA relative social disadvantage
  • Environmental land use
  • Nearby schools
  • Demographics including country of birth, household size, age, age by gender, and population size

An example of Nearmap use…

  • Police Search and Rescue use Nearmap to find individuals and evidence. Using Nearmap to look at elevation and slope, the search team can calculate how fast people (children vs adults vs the elderly) will move, including factoring in tiredness over time. This allows the search area to be plotted for maximum efficiency.

Access Nearmap via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select a relevant study area or view all databases to find the Nearmap link.

Find out more at http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/databases/nearmap

Anzac Day 2018

On Anzac Day, the 25th April, we pay tribute to and remember those who have served. Anzac Day is one of Australia’s most important national occasions, marking the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.

This year we commemorate the Centenary of the First World War (1914-1918).

Commemorating 100 years of ANZAC, Kelvin Grove Library.

To help understand the Australian experience of war, the Australian War Memorial website provides information about Anzac Day and the Memorial’s commemoration projects for the Centenary of the First World War.

QUT Library also has a wide range of resources available for learning more about Anzac Day and the First World War. The following books and videos are highly recommended:

We will be open on Anzac Day, Wednesday 25th April. Our library website provides more details on our opening hours.

World Book Day, Yay!

On the 23rd April get off Netflix and grab yourself a book. Not just because you know you should, but to celebrate our freedom to do just that.

It is our duty then, everywhere in the world, to protect these freedoms and to promote reading and writing in order to fight illiteracy and poverty and to strengthen the foundations of peace, as well as to protect the publishing-related professions and professionals.

It’s World Book Day, so time to think about how books make our lives better.  The Director General of UNESCO Audrey Azoulay tells us that when we celebrate books, we celebrate everything that comes  with them like writing, reading, translating and publishing. 

We like to think we do the same here at  QUT Library, and we have hundreds of thousands of books and eBooks, so why not borrow a classic, take on a new genre, or delve into something you’ve always wanted to explore?

Here are some suggestions from your friendly librarians:

Improve those negotiation skills with Getting to yes by Roger Fisher, William Ury & Bruce M Paton.

If you don’t have the time for a global odyssey enjoy someone else’s try Lights out in Wonderland by DBC Pierre.

If you want to read the book before you see the movie try The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

If you want to sharpen up those English grammar skills try Grammar for grown-ups : everything you need to know but never learnt in school

If you like botany and historical novels try The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert.

World Book Day isn’t just about books it’s about Copyright too, and QUT Library has this great guide to all things copyright.

 

 

 

 

 

New look Quick Find!

The new look Quick Find on the Library website can now be personalised just for you. Alongside your favourite features, you’ll find the following new functionality:

  • Permanently save your favourite items and search history to My Favourites.
  • Easily filter search results to show only online material or use the ‘Available in hardcopy’ filter to show only physical items.
  • Search for your unit code and find a link to your QUT Readings list.
  • Find more links to related articles in search results for peer-reviewed articles, like those on a similar topic, articles from the reference list or articles that have cited the paper.
  • Use the new browse items search to easily find your textbook or find books by a certain author.
  • Easily check if the Library has access to a specific journal using the new ‘Find a journal’ search.
  • Request scans of print journals and chapters of books held in the Library from within search results.
  • See your current loans and requests displayed in a more user-friendly way in the new-look ‘My loans and holds’, making it easy to check current loans, view hold and scan requests, or see any Library messages.
  • Automatic renewal of items on loan the end of the loan period (up to five times, unless recalled).

Visit QUT Library’s website for information about the new Quick Find search.

We’d love to know what you think about the new Quick Find, let us know your feedback or suggestions

 

On your marks, get set, GO!

The Commonwealth Games are on at the Gold Coast from 4th April – 18th April. Even though we are up in Brisbane we still need to expect changes to our commute to and from QUT, at both campuses! You can find all the details about what changes to expect from your train, bus, car or bike journeys at Get Set for the Games.

The Commonwealth Games do coincide with our extra-long mid semester break so you might not be coming to campus as often. But have no fear, you can access many library resources from the comfort of your own home. While you are keeping an eye on the marathon you can chat to a librarian about any of your borrowing, referencing or assignment questions. Or, whilst an exciting high jump competition is underway have a look at our How to Find guides. Want to watch all the swimming races you can but still need to find information for your assignments? No problems! Use the Library’s Quickfind search to find books, journal articles and conference papers or use one our many databases and specialised search tools to find the perfect article or set of statistics! And if you need any further assistance you can always contact HiQ.

Now you are all set to enjoy all the upcoming sporting events you want plus keep up to date to all your studies. Talk about winning!

You Go Geek Girl!

Today is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

A little over two years ago,  in a bid to achieve full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls and further achieve gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/70/212 declaring 11 February as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

QUT Library proudly supports this day and to celebrate we’ve put together a few nice reads and some films to watch to get your Geek Girl on.

READ…

If you’re looking for a new squad, check out Leslie Simon’s Geek girls unite: how fangirls, bookworms, indie chicks, and other misfits are taking over the world.  With illustrations by Nan Lawson.

If you’ve got a thing for young adult literature, or a budding geek girl in your life, you might try the bestselling and award winning Geek Girl series by Holly Smale.

It was a book before it was a movie!  Hidden Figures:  The American dream and the untold story of the Black women mathematicians who helped win the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly.

Ladies in the laboratory III: South African, Australian, New Zealand, and Canadian women in science, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries : a survey of their contributions  The women whose lives and work are discussed here range from natural history collectors and scientific illustrators of the early and mid-years of the 19th century to the first generation of graduates of the new colonial colleges and universities, by Mary R S Creese.

 

 

Academic Women in STEM Faculty: Views  beyond a decade after POWRE  This eBook looks at the major issues facing successful women in academic science, by Sue Rosser.

WATCH…

The Hidden Figures DVD:  As the US raced against Russia to put a man in space, NASA found untapped talent in a group of African-American female mathematicians that served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in U.S. history. Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson crossed all gender, race, and professional lines while their brilliance and desire to dream big in this 2016 movie.

These short and inspiring videos from the United Nations:

The story of Katherine Jin a young female scientist, her initial struggle to take part in science, and how her invention helps safeguard health workers. YouTube 3.53min.

Technology empowering women – Why the world needs women in technology – Atefeh Riaiazi YouTube 2.56min

 

 

 

Key technology tools for your IT Business Research

10 years ago when the iPhone was launched, the era of smartphones were just dawning. In 2005 most people received their news via radio, TV or Blackberries. Today most of us look first to our smart phones for information and if our phone is not to hand, we are at a loss and wonder what is going on in the world.

Those who analyse business trends love the Wayne Gretzky (Ice Hockey player) quote and Steve Jobs, at the end of the original iPhone launch couldn’t resist either: “Skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been”.

Indeed the holy grail of business analysis is predicting the path innovation will take and the speed at which it will move.

Sometimes it is a case of blink and technology overtakes you. (Just ask Nokia 🙂 )

So how to obtain a bleeding edge insight into today’s technology to predict future innovation trends?

Gartner has tools to frame information into visually concise evidence of current market conditions and future directions.

Gartner’s hype cycles graphically display the lifecycle of a technology and provides reference points as to where each company is located within that lifecycle.Use hype cycles to remove the hysteria of a technology’s popular value and instead discover its true commercial potential.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrants are visualization tools based on research, which positions companies within their market place and aligns them with their competitors.

Use Magic Quadrants to get quickly educated about a market’s technology providers, their competitive positioning and the strategies they are using to via for end-user business.

For more help contact HiQ

 

Australia Day Opening Hours

HiQ and QUT Library will be open on the Australia Day Public Holiday this Friday.

Gardens Point Library will be open 9am to 5pm and Kelvin Grove Library will be open 1pm to 5pm. QUT Law Library will be closed for Australia Day, while Online Chat will be available from 9am to 5pm. For more information please see our opening hours.

Looking for something to do this Australia Day?

You might like to explore QUT Library’s broad selection of ebooks and online videos while you relax and enjoy this public holiday.

If you’re feeling more studious, you might prefer to brush up on your software and skills in IT, design and business with QUT Library’s subscription to Lynda.com. This database provides online training videos and tutorials on course topics including office applications, 3D animation, audio engineering, CAD, software development, photography, video editing, and web design.

Christmas Break & the Library

Christmas and New Year are just around the corner. From the 23rd December until the 1st of January QUT Library is having a Christmas break and will be closed. But even though our libraries at Caboolture, Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point will be closed during this time you can still access many library resources online.

If you need to do some research, jump on the Library’s Website and search through Quickfind. Or search a database for your subject area by selecting looking under Databases and specialised search tools.

Not sure how to find the information you need? Have a look at our handy how to find guides to find the right database or website for your research.  You can also find online videos to watch at home and see what eBooks you can read right from the comfort of your home or at the beach!

And if you need further assistance, HiQ’s Contact Center will be available at the following times –

23 December – 31 December open 10am – 2pm

This excludes 25 & 26 December and the 1st January Public Holidays when HiQ are closed.

HiQ Service Points at Kelvin Grove Library & Gardens Point Library will be back in action on the 2nd January. Until then, from all of QUT Library, we hope you have a safe and happy holiday!

Tom’s Christmas Reading Recommendation

We have said it a few times recently that QUT Library has a whole bunch of Christmas movies and books to get you into the holiday spirit. And it’s still true! Here is another recommendation from Tom to get you inspired to read something festive.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens – available to borrow from QUT Library in print or as an audiobook or eBook

“Marley was dead: to begin with.”

The opening line to possibly the most famous Christmas story of all time is a classic, and one many of us have heard countless times since we were old enough to remember Christmas.  The number of movies, plays, TV episodes, and re-interpretations that have adapted one of Dickens’ most famous stories is immense.  The story, trials, and morals that follow shrewd businessman Ebenezer Scrooge are so ingrained into modern popular culture that there is no point restating the plot here.  Many people are familiar with the tale but how many have actually read the original?  I’m a little ashamed to admit that I did not read A Christmas Carol until well into my twenties.  In fact I’d never read any Dickens.  I was expecting something old and stuffy, written in a style of English that would be difficult for me to comprehend.   But it turns out that Dickens is a master of 19th Century sass.  He spends the first few pages slyly pulling apart the common phrase ‘as dead as door-nail’, feeling that coffin nails should be considered the most deceased types of iron. He has such a wonderful way with words and style, and the rhythm of language that you feel compelled to be drawn along by his prose.  The original novella is such an important part of our current culture of Christmas, and everyone should spend some quality time with it.

What’s your favourite Christmas movie, TV show or book? We want to know! Find us on Facebook, Instagram on Twitter or leave a comment on this blog!