Because of her, we can!

Banner logo for NAIDOC week with dates - 8-15th JulyWhat a great theme for this year’s NAIDOC week, celebrating the pillars of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander society – the women.

At QUT Library we thought we’d do the same by highlighting a few books and eBooks by some truly inspirational female indigenous authors.

Taboo by Kim Scott:

Taboo takes place in the present day, in the rural South-West of Western Australia, and tells the story of a group of Noongar people who revisit, for the first time in many decades, a taboo place: the site of a massacre that followed the assassination, by these Noongar’s descendants, of a white man who had stolen a black woman. They come at the invitation of Dan Horton, the elderly owner of the farm on which the massacres unfolded. He hopes that by hosting the group he will satisfy his wife’s dying wishes and cleanse some moral stain from the ground on which he and his family have lived for generations.

Remembered by Heart edited by Sally Morgan:

A collection of powerful, true stories of Aboriginal life This anthology brings together 15 memoirs of growing up Aboriginal in Australia and includes works from bestselling author Sally Morgan; and the critically acclaimed artist, author, and activist Bronwyn Bancroft. These true stories of adolescence are as diverse as they are moving, and offer readers insight into the pain, humor, grief, hope, and pride that makes up Indigenous experiences.

The Quiet Revolution: Indigenous people and the resources boom by Marcia Langton

When W.E.H. Stanner delivered the Boyer Lectures in 1968, he gave credence, perhaps inadvertently, to the widely held assumption at that time that Aboriginal life was incommensurate with modern economic life. Today, the expectation is quite the reverse. The emergence of an Aboriginal middle class in Australia in the last two to three decades has gone largely unnoticed. There are hundreds of Aboriginal businesses and Aboriginal not-for-profit corporations with income streams, delivering economic outcomes to communities on an unprecedented scale. This text is an investigation into the dependency of Aboriginal businesses and not-for-profit corporations on the resources industry, and their resultant vulnerability to economic downturns.

NAIDOC Week events at QUT this year include a free screening of The Sapphires on the A block lawn at KG (9th July 4:30-7.30pm) and a  panel discussion involving one of the original Sapphires, Aunty Lois Peeler.

Dr Anita Heiss has been confirmed as this year’s speaker for Paperbark: First Nation Narratives (8 August from 10.30 , KG Library) .  Dr Heiss will speak about her work and the Aboriginal literary pioneers who have inspired her.  She is an inspiring speaker so definitely something to mark out in your calendar.

Painted by Bigambul woman, Cheryl Moggs, from Goondiwindi, the painting portrays the 2018 theme, Because of her, we can!   It shows the courage and resilience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Listen here to the artist speak about her inspiration for the poster.

 

 

Relax & catch your breath between exams

You know when the words stop making sense on the page and you’re re-reading the same sentence again and again – it’s unlikely you’re taking anything in… your brain’s fried, it’s time to take a break….   White sneakers on green grass

QUT has some great distractions from the real world – so here are some ways to have a quick refresh, so you can get back to the books.

  • Have a game of table tennis – there’s a table in the courtyard on level 2 (entry level) at the KG Library
  • Take a walk around the Brisbane Botanical Gardens, just a hop skip and jump from the GP library
  • Head halfway across the Goodwill Bridge, have a coffee, and sit and watch as cyclists wreak havoc on pedestrians
  • Head up to the garden level of P Block (level 6,The Cube) at GP and stretch out on a bench for a power nap
  • Take a walk around the QUT Art Museum, a new exhibition begins on Saturday 16 June – Abstraction: Celebrating Australian Women Abstract Artists.
  • Get to the Games Lab at KG library and play a retro classic
  • Have a walk around the bookshops at either campus and pick up something great to enjoy over the break.
  • Go for an indoor swim – one-off rates are available at campus fitness centres.
  • If you’ve got a great spot and can’t bear to leave the library we have some great video streaming options (EduTV & Kanopy)

 

 

Don’t keep history a mystery

This month we celebrate National Reconciliation Week. 

The theme for 2018 is Don’t keep history a mystery, and aims to highlight some of the lesser known aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, histories, cultures, and achievements.  It’s calling on all Australians to ask the question:  What are some of the things I don’t know about our shared history?

On Thursday 31 May there’ll be a free screening of the movie, We Don’t Need a Map on level 2 of the Library/HiQ, R Block, KG.  Everyone’s welcome, and popcorn will be provided!

We Don’t Need a Map is a thought provoking look at Australia’s relationship with the Southern Cross, from its significance to indigenous Australians to its adoption as a national symbol.

There are a number of other activities happening around campus including the Inter-uni Reconciliation Cup against Griffith Uni,  and the first Vice-Chancellor’s Forum for the year with guest speaker, Stan Grant.

Check out more QUT Reconciliation Week activities here and find other community and national Reconciliation Week events here.

World Book Day, Yay!

On the 23rd April get off Netflix and grab yourself a book. Not just because you know you should, but to celebrate our freedom to do just that.

It is our duty then, everywhere in the world, to protect these freedoms and to promote reading and writing in order to fight illiteracy and poverty and to strengthen the foundations of peace, as well as to protect the publishing-related professions and professionals.

It’s World Book Day, so time to think about how books make our lives better.  The Director General of UNESCO Audrey Azoulay tells us that when we celebrate books, we celebrate everything that comes  with them like writing, reading, translating and publishing. 

We like to think we do the same here at  QUT Library, and we have hundreds of thousands of books and eBooks, so why not borrow a classic, take on a new genre, or delve into something you’ve always wanted to explore?

Here are some suggestions from your friendly librarians:

Improve those negotiation skills with Getting to yes by Roger Fisher, William Ury & Bruce M Paton.

If you don’t have the time for a global odyssey enjoy someone else’s try Lights out in Wonderland by DBC Pierre.

If you want to read the book before you see the movie try The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

If you want to sharpen up those English grammar skills try Grammar for grown-ups : everything you need to know but never learnt in school

If you like botany and historical novels try The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert.

World Book Day isn’t just about books it’s about Copyright too, and QUT Library has this great guide to all things copyright.

 

 

 

 

 

International Women’s Day

This International Women’s Day seems different to those of the past few years.

Maybe it’s because some of the sisterhood who’s achievements can sometimes be dismissed as frivolous have been rallying so loudly. They have forced action, leading to a shift in mindset for entire industries around the globe. Something that hadn’t hit a nerve in the entertainment world despite Hidden FiguresThelma & Louise and Norma Rae.

The #metoo movement, along with this year’s International Women’s Day call to arms  #PressforProgress will hopefully continue to spur not just women but everyone into action for real equality, diversity and inclusion.

Power to you, and Happy international Women’s Day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New business models for creative outputs

By Nerida Quatermass

In creative life, many things motivate us to share. Sharing has many benefits. An obvious benefit in a traditional business model is a sale of work. But sharing creativity is also about engagement with your community. Engagement can be difficult to achieve in a world chock a block full of creative content.

Creators are exploring new models for engagement. Interested?

The free eBook Made with Creative Commons showcases some extra-ordinary examples of creators who share their works incorporating licensing under Creative commons licences. It’s still possible to sell your work! As an example, think Cards against Humanity.

The case studies in the book exemplify the power of sharing, which is a defining value of the  Creative Commons movement:

The power of the open licences to maximise innovation.

The power of case studies to provide a guided transition to incorporating Creative Commons in open business models.

The publication of the book itself is a great story about the power of community as the book was crowd-funded on Kickstarter.

In addition to accewaterdropsssing the eBook there are a number of ways that you can get hold of a copy of this book to keep.

(Made with Creative Commons. Cover design by Klaus Nielsen, vinterstille.dk)

(Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash)

 

 

Love Data Week Guest blogger: Barriers to open data sharing

The 2014 Ebola outbreak mobilized groups of researchers across the world to sequence viral genomes and share data providing information crucial to “designing effective diagnostics, vaccines and antibody-based therapies” [1].  However uncertainties around ownership of data, intellectual property rights, patient consent and poor management of data all make access to the source of truth very difficult and often essential data is not available to research community working on epidemics.    QUT PhD candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, discusses some of these barriers to open data sharing in her guest blog today. 

[1]    Yozwiak, N. L., Schaffner, S. F., Sabeti, P. C.: Data sharing: Make outbreak research open access. Nature, 2015, 518:477–479, doi:10.1038/518477a

My desire to pursue research in this field began when I was a junior bench scientist some 10 years ago, conducting anti-malarial drug research. I was confronted with the commercial aspect of scientific research.  I learned about the institutional arrangements between industry, academia, the community, or “consumers”.  I also learned about how intellectual property, patents, and funding arrangements play a critical yet limiting role in contributing to the advancement of scientific knowledge.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid

PhD Candidate Anisa Rowhani-Farid

It became clear to me that scientific research is driven and, more often than not, pressured by the funding available from government and industry, and that these relationships are primarily based on the conception that scientific knowledge is generated through research that views knowledge as a commodity, distributed at a cost to other researchers and most importantly, populations that might need open access to that knowledge.

As I read more, I wondered what happened to all the public money that was spent on health and medical research. I read Chalmers and Glasziou’s (2009) paper on research waste, as well as the series that was published in the Lancet in 2014 called ‘Research: increasing value, reducing waste’.  I learned that around 85% of the world’s spending on health and medical research is wasted per year, and a contributing factor was that the findings of medical studies cannot be reproduced by other researchers and so seemingly successful medical breakthroughs are thus unverifiable [1, 2]. This reproducibility crisis in health and medical research made me think of the way in which scientific knowledge progresses.  I was fascinated by the paper written by John Ioannidis in 2005 where he concluded through simulations that most published findings in the scientific discourse are false and misleading [3, 4].

If most of what is claimed in the scientific literature is false, and if scientists are adopting malpractices because of the pressure to commercialise so-called ‘medical breakthroughs’, then how deep will the cultural change have to be for scientists to conduct high-quality research with integrity, and share all their findings, positive or negative? This question has motivated my doctorate of philosophy.

  1. Chalmers I, Glasziou P: Avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence. The Lancet 2009, 374(9683):86-89.
  2. Chalmers I, Bracken M, Djulbegovic B, Garattini S, Grant J, Gülmezoglu M, Howells D, Ioannidis J, Oliver S: How to increase value and reduce waste when research priorities are set. The Lancet 2014, 383(9912):156-165.
  3. Ioannidis J: How to Make More Published Research True. PLoS Med 2014, 11(10):e1001747.
  4. Ioannidis JPA: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False. PLOS Medicine 2005, 2(8):e124.

Watch this video (YouTube 2m8s) from Anisa Rowhani-Farid and follow her @AnisaFarid on Twitter.

Anisa Rowhani-Farid (YouTube video, 2m8s)If you’re a researcher, we’d love to hear from you.  Leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18 #qutlibrary

 

Love Data Week 2018

It’s Love Data Week!

From the 12th to the 16th of February, along with other academic and research libraries, data archives and organisations, QUT Library is celebrating the value and importance of research data, which we believe are the foundation of the scholarly record and crucial for advancing our knowledge of the world around us.

The theme for the 2018 social media event is ‘data stories’ including :

Stories about data
Telling stories with data
Connected conversations
We are data

Anisa Rowhani-Farid, from the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health who’s completing a PhD Towards a culture of open science and data sharing in health and medical research at QUT has this to say about data and reproducible science:

Efforts are underway by the global meta-research community to strengthen the reliability of the scientific method [1].  Data sharing is an indispensable part of the movement towards science that is open; where scientific truth is not a questionable commodity, but is easily accessible, replicable, and verifiable [2].  The cultural shift towards reproducible science is complex and it calls for a twofold change in the attitudes of individual researchers toward reproducibility, and the leadership provided by the systems and services that support scientific research.  As such, journals, universities, government bodies, and funders are key players in promoting this culture.  Transparency and reproducibility are elements central to strengthening the scientific method, and data provides the key to scientific truth [3].”

 

  1. Ioannidis JPA, Fanelli D, Dunne DD, Goodman SN: Meta-research: Evaluation and Improvement of Research Methods and Practices. PLoS Biol 2015, 13(10):e1002264.
  2. Reproducibility and reliability of biomedical research: improving research practice. In.: The Academy of Medical Sciences; 2015.
  3. Iqbal SA, Wallach JD, Khoury MJ, Schully SD, Ioannidis JPA: Reproducible Research Practices and Transparency across the Biomedical Literature. PLoS Biol 2016, 14(1):e1002333.

If you’re a researcher, leave a comment below on your data story.

Visit the Love Data Week blog each day for stories, resources and activities and if you would like to join the conversation via Twitter #lovedata18  @qutlibrary

You Go Geek Girl!

Today is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

A little over two years ago,  in a bid to achieve full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls and further achieve gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/70/212 declaring 11 February as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

QUT Library proudly supports this day and to celebrate we’ve put together a few nice reads and some films to watch to get your Geek Girl on.

READ…

If you’re looking for a new squad, check out Leslie Simon’s Geek girls unite: how fangirls, bookworms, indie chicks, and other misfits are taking over the world.  With illustrations by Nan Lawson.

If you’ve got a thing for young adult literature, or a budding geek girl in your life, you might try the bestselling and award winning Geek Girl series by Holly Smale.

It was a book before it was a movie!  Hidden Figures:  The American dream and the untold story of the Black women mathematicians who helped win the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly.

Ladies in the laboratory III: South African, Australian, New Zealand, and Canadian women in science, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries : a survey of their contributions  The women whose lives and work are discussed here range from natural history collectors and scientific illustrators of the early and mid-years of the 19th century to the first generation of graduates of the new colonial colleges and universities, by Mary R S Creese.

 

 

Academic Women in STEM Faculty: Views  beyond a decade after POWRE  This eBook looks at the major issues facing successful women in academic science, by Sue Rosser.

WATCH…

The Hidden Figures DVD:  As the US raced against Russia to put a man in space, NASA found untapped talent in a group of African-American female mathematicians that served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in U.S. history. Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson crossed all gender, race, and professional lines while their brilliance and desire to dream big in this 2016 movie.

These short and inspiring videos from the United Nations:

The story of Katherine Jin a young female scientist, her initial struggle to take part in science, and how her invention helps safeguard health workers. YouTube 3.53min.

Technology empowering women – Why the world needs women in technology – Atefeh Riaiazi YouTube 2.56min

 

 

 

Winners of the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize Announced

A paper on the topography of the dragonfly wing has taken out first place in the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize. Chaturanga Bandara was awarded first prize and $1500 for his article, Bactericidal Effects of Natural Nanotopography of Dragonfly Wing on Escherichia coli, published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

(L to R: Onur Bas, Chaturanga Bandara, Anna Worthy)

The SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize was awarded to a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student, who was the lead author on a paper published in a peer reviewed journal with a Q1 or Q2 ranking in Scimago. A panel of six judges, three academics and three librarians, evaluated the submissions on originality and readability (writing style and clarity). QUT Library Research Support Manager, Stephanie Bradbury, said that the calibre of entrants to the competition was extremely impressive, and that Chaturanga was the unanimous choice of the judging panel. Second place and $900 was awarded to Onur Bas for his paper, An Integrated Design, Material, and Fabrication Platform for Engineering Biomechanically and Biologically Functional Soft Tissues. Anna Worthy was awarded third place and received $500 for her paper, Atomic resolution of structural changes in elastic crystals of copper(II) acetylacetonate, published in Nature Chemistry.

The awards were presented to the winners on Monday 11 December by Scholarly Communications Librarian, Paula Callan. QUT Library would like to thank SAGE for sponsoring the Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize.