Winter is here and so is Week One

Although Week One can seem dark and full of terrors it doesn’t have it to be. With some help from QUT Library you can start this semester with confidence and the right tools to succeed.

Here are some of our top tips for getting started on the right foot this semester.

  1. Check out our online learning modules about referencing and finding information. These will help you get on track for your assignments and start the semester well ahead of the White Walkers.
  2. Make sure to stay on top of your readings. Do this by being organised and reading efficiently for university. Top tip – you don’t have to read every word. Our previous blog, Reading at University, gives great advice so you don’t spend your semester swamped by Lannister enemies or in in your readings.
  3. Find your prescribed textbooks at the Library. Search our Classic Catalogue for a unit number to find its prescribed texts. Can’t find an available copy? Request a copy of the book by placing a hold on it or see if it is available through our BONUS+ Catalogue. You could also look for an earlier edition, although make sure to check that the information in the older book is still current and accurate.
  4. And finally, make sure to say hi to the friendly staff at HiQ. They can provide support for all your university needs such as library assistance, IT support and student administration. Unlike Jon Snow, they know a lot!

So start your semester off with a bang, figuratively not Cersei literally, and visit QUT Library.

Cooking up Success with Copyright!

Recently Librarians and Archivists from around Australia cooked their way to success! On the 15 June 2017 the Copyright Amendment (Disability Access and other Measures) Act was passed through Parliament with full support. This means that previously copyright protected documents such as diaries, letters and old recipes are no longer hidden away. They will be able to be made freely available to the public.

This massive reform was made possible by the Cooking for Copyright campaign launched in 2015 by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) as part of its FAIR (Freedom of Access to Information and Resources) initiative. Participants were encouraged to cook vintage recipes as a fun way to raise awareness about the need for copyright reform and to highlight the issues associated with perpetual copyright for unpublished materials.

Jessica Coates from the Australian Librarians Copyright Committee says “Even when notes or scribbles are hundreds of years old with no possible chance of tracking down descendants, they are still locked away due to copyright protections. This change means things like the diaries of Captain Cook or the letters of Jane Austen can be accessed and used by school kids, researchers and the general public.” You can find more information about the copyright success from the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee.

To celebrate this amazing achievement, QUT Library is hosting another Cooking for Copyright morning tea exactly two years after the first one. Here are all the details –

When – Monday 31st July at 10:30am

Where – QUT Gardens Point Library, V Block, Level 3, Activity Room

How – Please register for this event via EventBrite

More reform is needed to Australian copyright law to achieve the balance required for creators and users of copyright materials to participate in knowledge creation. Professor Matthew Rimmer, Professor, Intellectual Property and Innovation Law School, will speak to this issue.

NAIDOC Week – Our Languages Matter

2017 National NAIDOC logo

NAIDOC Week runs from the 2-9 July and celebrates the rich history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia. This year’s theme is ‘Our Languages Matter’ and hopes to emphasise the vital role Indigenous language plays in the cultural identity, spirituality for Indigenous Australians and in linking them to their land and water.

Today only about 120 languages from over 250 are still spoken and many are at risk of being lost. Each unique language carries with it stories, rites and knowledge so it is important they each one is preserved and maintained. Ms Anne Martin, National NAIDOC Committee Co-Chair has said,

“Each language is associated with an area of land and has a deep spiritual significance and it is through their own languages, that Indigenous nations maintain their connection with their ancestors, land and law.”

This NAIDOC Week why not learn about the languages that shaped Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Here are some of the resources available at QUT Library that can get you started on your language journey.

Semester Break is here!

It’s that time of year again where all you have to do rest, recuperate and have some fun. Even though you may not need to use the library to find information for your assignments or to borrow your text books, while on holiday there are still a lot of fun things you can access at the Library to make your semester break even better!

Did you know you can borrow and play computer games? Borrow your favourites for the holiday and play all you want. Kelvin Grove Library even has Xbox One and PS4 consoles available to use in the Games Lab on level 4. The most popular games are already installed on these so you can get playing straight away!

You can also settle in and borrow or stream the movies you have been dying to see and the TV shows you need to catch up on, all through QUT Library. Watch Star Wars: The Force Awakens, get started watching Vikings or re-watch Game of Thrones Season 6 to prepare for the upcoming season. There are so many feature films and TV series to watch semester break won’t be long enough!

Want to rest your eyes from all the screens around you? Don’t forget you can borrow novels from the library too. This includes young adult fiction, found in the Curriculum Collection, and graphic novels too. Plus we have three great eBook platforms, including BorrowBox, Axis 360 and Overdrive fiction collection, where you can find audiobooks as well as some more great reading material.

Now you are all set to enjoy your semester break to the fullest. From all of us at QUT Library, stay safe, have fun and we will see you soon!

 

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize now open to Q1 + Q2 journals

The SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize has been extended to include Q1 and Q2 Scimago ranked journals. Higher Degree Research (HDR) students who are the lead author on a paper that has been published in a peer reviewed journal with a Q1 or Q2 ranking in Scimago, can enter the SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize.

Three prizes are up for grabs: first prize $1500; second $900 and; third prize $500. A panel of five will evaluate the papers entered based on originality and readability (writing style and clarity).Don’t miss this opportunity to be recognised for your research and writing skills.

To enter you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) or Quartile 2 (Q2) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

You’ve already done the hard work of writing and publishing the paper, enter now with the chance to further highlight your research!

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information, contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Exam Preparation 101

Exams are just around the corner. To get you through this semester we have put together our top tips for surviving exams.

  1. Have a look at the Exam Preparation page. There is lots of useful information here including understanding your type be that multiple choice, short answer or essay exams .
  2. See if there any past exams available for your units. If there aren’t any available have a look at some of the library’s Test Taking Skills And remember to practice, practice, and practice some more!
  3. Check your Blackboard site to see if your lecturer or tutor has provided any tips for your exam. What will it cover? How long will it go for? What format will it be? Any information you can get about your exam is good information.
  4. Exams can be stressful but you can manage your exam stress. And if you need some assistance with this, QUT Counselling Services are available.
  5. Find your perfect nook! QUT Gardens Point Library will open with extended opening hours from the 2nd June – 23rd Each night the Gardens Point Library will be open until 2am, plenty of time for you to find the perfect place to study for your exams.

And finally, from all of us at QUT Library, good luck!

National Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs annually marking two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: The 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision, respectively.  This year is highly significant because it is 50 years since the 1967 referendum, and 25 years since the historic Mabo decision.

This year QUT Library will be running a number of events  as part of National Reconciliation Week from 27 May – 3 June. Throughout the week, QUT Library Kelvin Grove will host a number of video screenings, music and book displays on Level 2, 3 & 4 of the building.

Also, during this time the Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove HiQ digital walls will be showcasing Indigenous talent, culture and history, with features from outstanding QUT Alumni.

Please come and join us in celebrating these highly important events in Australia’s reconciliation journey.

Referencing Hack #4 – What’s in a numbered reference?

One question we get asked a lot at the library is what are all the parts that make up the reference? This referencing hack breaks down a QUT Numbered reference so that we can fully understand all the components of it.

Here is our example, which is a journal article with DOI (Digital Object Identifier).

And here are what all the parts, separated by different colours, refer to.

Grey – This is the number assigned to the reference in text. These run consecutively with the first reference having the number [1] then the next reference has [2] and so on.

Pink – These are the authors of the journal article.

Light green – This is the title of the journal article.

Light Blue – This is the abbreviated name of the journal that this article was published in.

Orange – The online medium on which you accessed this article. This is usually [Internet].

Dark blue – The year the journal article was published.

Purple – The exact date that you referenced this article in your assignment.

Red – Information about the journal article. The volume number comes first and the issue number (if the article has one) follows in brackets.

Dark green – This refers to the number of computer screens the online resource runs over i.e. roughly how many screens did you scroll through to read the whole article?

Black – This is the URL of the journal article.

Yellow – The DOI [Digital Object Identifier] of the journal article.

These sections can be applied to other examples of numbered referencing also, with perhaps small tweaks. You can view more examples on QUT cite|write. If you need further assistance with understanding your referencing don’t forget you can always contact a referencing expert!

 

Referencing Hack #2 – Square vs Round Brackets

With QUT Legal referencing one of the more tricky concepts to navigate is whether you need to use square or round brackets when citing cases. Don’t worry, you are not alone! Here are some tips to help clear up some of the confusion so you know exactly what to cite.

Tip #1 Figure out what the abbreviation is to determine if it is from a reported legal series or an unreported judgment by looking at our Common Cases Abbreviation list. An unreported judgment’s abbreviation will often be a court of law, such as the QCA (Queensland Court of Appeal) or the FCA (Federal Court of Australia). A reported judgment means the case was published in a report series, such as the Commonwealth Law Reports or the Queensland Reports.

Tip #2 Reported Judgments with square brackets [2017] – The date within the square brackets is the year this case was published in the report series. It is also the volume number. If there is more then one part of a volume there will be a sequential number after the brackets, such as 1 or 2. A case may wait a few years before it is published so these report series’ may contain cases that were heard from a variety of years.The citation below shows that that the case can be found in volume 2016 of the Queensland Reports, part 1.

Tip #3 Reported Judgments with round brackets (2017) – The date within the round brackets is the year of the case’s judgment. Report series who use round brackets organise their volumes by a volume number, which can be found directly after the date in round brackets. The citation below shows that the case can be found in volume 256 of the Commonwealth Law Reports.

Tip #4 Unreported Judgments always have square brackets [2017] – If your abbreviation relates to a specific court of law then your citation is an unreported judgement otherwise known as a medium neutral citation. The date within the square brackets is the year of judgment. Remember, unreported judgments may also be published in a reported series, so make sure to keep an eye out for alternative citations.You should always cite using the most authoritative citation. More information about authoritative cases can be found on our Introduction to Case Law Guide. 

If you need further assistance with your referencing you can contact your friendly QUT Librarians for help.

Referencing Hack #1 – Edited eBooks

With assignments getting finalised, referencing is high on the To Do list. Over the next week or so we will be sharing our top tips for referencing to make completing your assignment that much easier.

The first tip we want to share is referencing a chapter in an edited eBook with QUT APA. Although there are no specific examples in QUT cite|write on how to do this, we recommend combining the references for Chapter in an Edited Book and Electronic Book (eBook) together. You keep the first half of the Chapter in an edited book example but when you get to the publishing details exchange them for the eBook details including the eBook platform and the URL or DOI for the eBook. Below are 2 examples, from the APA Blog, on how put this all together.

The second example contains a DOI, which is a Digital Object Identifier, and should always be used if available over a standard web address.

Key takeaway – even if you can’t find a specific referencing example for your resource on QUT Cite Write, you can build your own reference using parts from other examples. This goes for many referencing styles! However, if you are unsure about your referencing, you can always contact the library for assistance.

Have a tricky referencing question? Let us know know can add it to our Referencing Hack series!