On your marks, get set, GO!

The Commonwealth Games are on at the Gold Coast from 4th April – 18th April. Even though we are up in Brisbane we still need to expect changes to our commute to and from QUT, at both campuses! You can find all the details about what changes to expect from your train, bus, car or bike journeys at Get Set for the Games.

The Commonwealth Games do coincide with our extra-long mid semester break so you might not be coming to campus as often. But have no fear, you can access many library resources from the comfort of your own home. While you are keeping an eye on the marathon you can chat to a librarian about any of your borrowing, referencing or assignment questions. Or, whilst an exciting high jump competition is underway have a look at our How to Find guides. Want to watch all the swimming races you can but still need to find information for your assignments? No problems! Use the Library’s Quickfind search to find books, journal articles and conference papers or use one our many databases and specialised search tools to find the perfect article or set of statistics! And if you need any further assistance you can always contact HiQ.

Now you are all set to enjoy all the upcoming sporting events you want plus keep up to date to all your studies. Talk about winning!

Easter Opening Hours

Easter is fast approaching, as is semester break. This is a great time to relax but to also get a head start on the second half of the semester. The Library and HiQ are here to help you with that! During the Easter Break Kelvin Grove, Gardens Point, and Law Libraries will be open, here are all the full details –

Friday 31st March – Closed

Saturday 1st April – Open 9am-5pm

Sunday 2nd April – Open 9am-5pm

Monday 3rd April – Open 9am-5pm

The Law Library will be open from Saturday to Monday also but from 10am-5pm.

If you can’t make it into campus you can also chat to HiQ online.

After the public holidays our normal opening hours will resume. From everyone at QUT Library we hope you all have a happy and safe long weekend!

Go for gold!

The Winter Olympics start this week, the same as Orientation Week here at QUT. What a coincidence! Just like the Winter Olympians, to succeed at university you must prepare and work hard. QUT Library is offering several Library 101 workshops so you can prepare yourself for the upcoming semester. Practice your referencing, polish your searching skills and discover all of the services and resources available at QUT Library.

If you are aiming for a gold medal this semester, you can also have a look at study skills workshops and library tours. These will help you develop your study skills and, you guessed it, prepare yourself for getting the most out of your classes and assignments.

Preparing for university, and the Olympics, also means thinking about your health and wellbeing. QUT Library’s video streaming service, Kanopy, has over 300 videos related to sport and fitness. Plus you can watch Dr. Anna Baranowsky explain How to create a wellness mind map or find The Secret of Life Wellness.

You can also contact HiQ to get assistance as you (just like the Winter Olympians!) strive for gold this semester!

Key technology tools for your IT Business Research

10 years ago when the iPhone was launched, the era of smartphones were just dawning. In 2005 most people received their news via radio, TV or Blackberries. Today most of us look first to our smart phones for information and if our phone is not to hand, we are at a loss and wonder what is going on in the world.

Those who analyse business trends love the Wayne Gretzky (Ice Hockey player) quote and Steve Jobs, at the end of the original iPhone launch couldn’t resist either: “Skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been”.

Indeed the holy grail of business analysis is predicting the path innovation will take and the speed at which it will move.

Sometimes it is a case of blink and technology overtakes you. (Just ask Nokia 🙂 )

So how to obtain a bleeding edge insight into today’s technology to predict future innovation trends?

Gartner has tools to frame information into visually concise evidence of current market conditions and future directions.

Gartner’s hype cycles graphically display the lifecycle of a technology and provides reference points as to where each company is located within that lifecycle.Use hype cycles to remove the hysteria of a technology’s popular value and instead discover its true commercial potential.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrants are visualization tools based on research, which positions companies within their market place and aligns them with their competitors.

Use Magic Quadrants to get quickly educated about a market’s technology providers, their competitive positioning and the strategies they are using to via for end-user business.

For more help contact HiQ

 

Christmas Break & the Library

Christmas and New Year are just around the corner. From the 23rd December until the 1st of January QUT Library is having a Christmas break and will be closed. But even though our libraries at Caboolture, Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point will be closed during this time you can still access many library resources online.

If you need to do some research, jump on the Library’s Website and search through Quickfind. Or search a database for your subject area by selecting looking under Databases and specialised search tools.

Not sure how to find the information you need? Have a look at our handy how to find guides to find the right database or website for your research.  You can also find online videos to watch at home and see what eBooks you can read right from the comfort of your home or at the beach!

And if you need further assistance, HiQ’s Contact Center will be available at the following times –

23 December – 31 December open 10am – 2pm

This excludes 25 & 26 December and the 1st January Public Holidays when HiQ are closed.

HiQ Service Points at Kelvin Grove Library & Gardens Point Library will be back in action on the 2nd January. Until then, from all of QUT Library, we hope you have a safe and happy holiday!

Tom’s Christmas Reading Recommendation

We have said it a few times recently that QUT Library has a whole bunch of Christmas movies and books to get you into the holiday spirit. And it’s still true! Here is another recommendation from Tom to get you inspired to read something festive.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens – available to borrow from QUT Library in print or as an audiobook or eBook

“Marley was dead: to begin with.”

The opening line to possibly the most famous Christmas story of all time is a classic, and one many of us have heard countless times since we were old enough to remember Christmas.  The number of movies, plays, TV episodes, and re-interpretations that have adapted one of Dickens’ most famous stories is immense.  The story, trials, and morals that follow shrewd businessman Ebenezer Scrooge are so ingrained into modern popular culture that there is no point restating the plot here.  Many people are familiar with the tale but how many have actually read the original?  I’m a little ashamed to admit that I did not read A Christmas Carol until well into my twenties.  In fact I’d never read any Dickens.  I was expecting something old and stuffy, written in a style of English that would be difficult for me to comprehend.   But it turns out that Dickens is a master of 19th Century sass.  He spends the first few pages slyly pulling apart the common phrase ‘as dead as door-nail’, feeling that coffin nails should be considered the most deceased types of iron. He has such a wonderful way with words and style, and the rhythm of language that you feel compelled to be drawn along by his prose.  The original novella is such an important part of our current culture of Christmas, and everyone should spend some quality time with it.

What’s your favourite Christmas movie, TV show or book? We want to know! Find us on Facebook, Instagram on Twitter or leave a comment on this blog!

Sue’s Christmas Recommendations

QUT Library has so many Christmas movies, books and TV shows to get you into the festive mood. We have asked some our librarians what their all time favourite Christmas movies and books were. Here is what Sue recommends!

The Polar Express (2005) Available on DVD or online via Click View (QUT Login required)

Continuing our theme of best loved Christmas movies, make sure you get hold of The Polar Express before everyone else does.  Bit of a heads up, though – do yourself a favour and read the original, award winning, children’s picture book  by Chris Van Allsburg first so as to fully appreciate the lavish, darkly-themed artwork that became the inspiration for the movie.

What’s it about? Having reached an age where he doubts that Santa is real, a young boy (we never learn his name) wakes suddenly on Christmas Eve to see a mysterious steam train in the falling snow outside of his bedroom. Imagine his amazement when he realises that the train is waiting for him to board, ready for their journey to the North Pole! This movie is not like other Christmas films.  It has a magical, shadowy quality which characterises it, just like the beautiful full-page illustrations found in the original book.  It is this that appeals to me so strongly.  My children and I enjoyed reading the book together for several years before the movie’s release in 2004 and I was delighted that the film remains so stylistically true to the book’s artwork.

The movie is a 3D animation using motion capture and is entered in the Guinness World Book of Records as being the world’s first all-digital capture film.  The music is amazing, featuring an original score by Alan Silvestri along with many well-loved Christmas favourites.

I would recommend this movie for children aged perhaps 7+ as it may be a bit dark for the littlies.  Having said that, this is a heart-warming, powerful and endearing movie that continues to be a seasonal favourite at our house.

Tom’s Christmas Recommendations

QUT Library has a wealth of Christmas movies, books and TV shows to get you into the festive mood. We have asked some our librarians what their all time favourite Christmas movies and books were. Here is what Tom thinks!

Arthur Christmas (2011)  Available on EduTV via Informit (QUT log in required)

This is the movie that is currently in my ‘must see’ Christmas movie rotation list, and absolutely love showing it to friends that have never seen it before.  Arthur Christmas is a 3D animated film by Aardman Animations (the same folks who brought us Wallace and Gromit) that portrays the legacy of Santa Clause as a very real, and very secret, family business with the title of ‘Santa’ being handed down from father to son for centuries.  The humour is wonderfully British and ranges from the very silly to some darker adult jokes, whilch leads to some great scenes such as an army of elves questioning the existence of children, and a European Union-esque security alliance scrambling predator drones when they mistake Santa’s sleigh as an invading alien spaceship.  The characters are voiced by all of your favourite English actors including James McAvoy, Hugh Laurie, Bill Nighy, Jim Broadbent and Imelda Staunton.  In the end this movie is about family, the spirit of Christmas, keeping tradition, breaking tradition, and wrapping presents with only three bits of tape.

The Snowman (1982) Available to borrow from QUT Library

The Snowman holds a very special place in my childhood, as my family would watch it every Christmas Eve, in the dark, with only the coloured glow of our Christmas tree to light up the room.  It is a gorgeous, animated short film, based on the picture book by Raymond Briggs, which tells the story of a small boy who builds a snowman that comes to life at the stroke of midnight.  They go on a series of small adventures including a magical flight to the North Pole, where they meet Father Christmas at a party full of other living snowmen.  Remarkably, the film is completely wordless and relies on music and animation to tell its story.  It never fails to bring a tear to my eye, especially during the enchanting song “Walking In The Air”, and the tale’s sad and bittersweet ending.  It won a BAFTA and an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. Here is a trailer for one of the more recent sequals to The Snowman, The Snowman & The Snow Dog.

We have even more to recommend so keep an eye out for more blogs with Christmas cheer!

 

Patents Search – Tracking Innovation

Want to discover the latest breakthroughs of applied researchers in your field? Looking for practical solutions to real-world problems? Interested in device design drawings and detailed specifications?

You should search for patents that have been granted to inventors.  Need to know where to begin your patent search? Consult our library subject guide on patent searching. http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/patents

Scientists, engineers and technologists often find their search of databases that index and contain the conventional, peer-reviewed literature fails to yield detail on cutting-edge innovation. They understand that to gain a more complete understanding of the state-of-the-art they need to expand their literature discovery by searching for registered patents.

What is a Patent?

A patent is a right granted to the inventor for a device, substance, method or process that is new when compared with what is already known. A patent protects new inventions and covers how things work, what they do, how they do it, what they are made of and how they are made. It gives the owner the right to prevent others from making, using, importing or selling the invention without permission. Patents are often granted for small, incremental improvements to a known technology. A patent is legally enforceable. It gives the inventor exclusive right to commercially exploit her / his invention for the life of the patent.

Patent Search for Beginners

Google Scholar search will include patents in your search results (by default). There is also a specialist Google Patents search interface. All the major patents offices have their own search engine and discovery platform.

When an invention or device is truly new, there is no established or agreed terminology to describe it. The inventor (usually via their attorney or agent) also have a vested interest in making their patent difficult to discover. Accordingly, you should also search for patents by class.

Patent Classification

Patent examiners typically classify an inventor’s application for a grant of patent into several classes, depending on that invention’s components and functions. Classification brings together similar devices and concepts, even when different terms have been used to describe the invention.

Classification systems provide a language independent search tool, one that embraces all domains of technology:

  • Patent classes are well-defined and scoped;
  • Patent classes are arranged in an ordered and logical fashion;
  • Patent classes are hierarchical. Classes are deconstructed into detailed sub-classes.

To conduct a thorough and comprehensive patent search you should search by class.

Learn More — Delve Deeper

QUT Library has a subject guide to help you navigate the patent process and that shows you how to discover patents.

QUT helps break down the digital divide

Knowledge Unlatched logoIn 2014, QUT signed up as a founding member of a global initiative called Knowledge Unlatched (KU) which unites the two approaches of crowd-funding and Open Access to support the publication of specialist scholarly books.   Digital copies of the books supported by KU can be freely accessed by anyone in the world via OAPEN, HathiTrust and the British Library.  Libraries can include the books in their collections free of charge.

Frances Pinter, the Embassador/Founder of KU, says that the approach “ensures that in the digital world we are not just replicating the old print model, but that we can indeed do better and contribute to breaking down what is fast becoming a new digital divide.”

Frances Pinter spoke of “Transforming publishing – issues around policy, funding and publishing” at State Library of Queensland on 23 November 2017. A recording of her presentation is available here.

Contact Paula Callan, Scholarly Communications Librarian, for further details.