National Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs annually marking two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: The 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision, respectively.  This year is highly significant because it is 50 years since the 1967 referendum, and 25 years since the historic Mabo decision.

This year QUT Library will be running a number of events  as part of National Reconciliation Week from 27 May – 3 June. Throughout the week, QUT Library Kelvin Grove will host a number of video screenings, music and book displays on Level 2, 3 & 4 of the building.

Also, during this time the Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove HiQ digital walls will be showcasing Indigenous talent, culture and history, with features from outstanding QUT Alumni.

Please come and join us in celebrating these highly important events in Australia’s reconciliation journey.

Referencing Hack #4 – What’s in a numbered reference?

One question we get asked a lot at the library is what are all the parts that make up the reference? This referencing hack breaks down a QUT Numbered reference so that we can fully understand all the components of it.

Here is our example, which is a journal article with DOI (Digital Object Identifier).

And here are what all the parts, separated by different colours, refer to.

Grey – This is the number assigned to the reference in text. These run consecutively with the first reference having the number [1] then the next reference has [2] and so on.

Pink – These are the authors of the journal article.

Light green – This is the title of the journal article.

Light Blue – This is the abbreviated name of the journal that this article was published in.

Orange – The online medium on which you accessed this article. This is usually [Internet].

Dark blue – The year the journal article was published.

Purple – The exact date that you referenced this article in your assignment.

Red – Information about the journal article. The volume number comes first and the issue number (if the article has one) follows in brackets.

Dark green – This refers to the number of computer screens the online resource runs over i.e. roughly how many screens did you scroll through to read the whole article?

Black – This is the URL of the journal article.

Yellow – The DOI [Digital Object Identifier] of the journal article.

These sections can be applied to other examples of numbered referencing also, with perhaps small tweaks. You can view more examples on QUT cite|write. If you need further assistance with understanding your referencing don’t forget you can always contact a referencing expert!

 

Referencing Hack #2 – Square vs Round Brackets

With QUT Legal referencing one of the more tricky concepts to navigate is whether you need to use square or round brackets when citing cases. Don’t worry, you are not alone! Here are some tips to help clear up some of the confusion so you know exactly what to cite.

Tip #1 Figure out what the abbreviation is to determine if it is from a reported legal series or an unreported judgment by looking at our Common Cases Abbreviation list. An unreported judgment’s abbreviation will often be a court of law, such as the QCA (Queensland Court of Appeal) or the FCA (Federal Court of Australia). A reported judgment means the case was published in a report series, such as the Commonwealth Law Reports or the Queensland Reports.

Tip #2 Reported Judgments with square brackets [2017] – The date within the square brackets is the year this case was published in the report series. It is also the volume number. If there is more then one part of a volume there will be a sequential number after the brackets, such as 1 or 2. A case may wait a few years before it is published so these report series’ may contain cases that were heard from a variety of years.The citation below shows that that the case can be found in volume 2016 of the Queensland Reports, part 1.

Tip #3 Reported Judgments with round brackets (2017) – The date within the round brackets is the year of the case’s judgment. Report series who use round brackets organise their volumes by a volume number, which can be found directly after the date in round brackets. The citation below shows that the case can be found in volume 256 of the Commonwealth Law Reports.

Tip #4 Unreported Judgments always have square brackets [2017] – If your abbreviation relates to a specific court of law then your citation is an unreported judgement otherwise known as a medium neutral citation. The date within the square brackets is the year of judgment. Remember, unreported judgments may also be published in a reported series, so make sure to keep an eye out for alternative citations.You should always cite using the most authoritative citation. More information about authoritative cases can be found on our Introduction to Case Law Guide. 

If you need further assistance with your referencing you can contact your friendly QUT Librarians for help.

Referencing Hack #1 – Edited eBooks

With assignments getting finalised, referencing is high on the To Do list. Over the next week or so we will be sharing our top tips for referencing to make completing your assignment that much easier.

The first tip we want to share is referencing a chapter in an edited eBook with QUT APA. Although there are no specific examples in QUT cite|write on how to do this, we recommend combining the references for Chapter in an Edited Book and Electronic Book (eBook) together. You keep the first half of the Chapter in an edited book example but when you get to the publishing details exchange them for the eBook details including the eBook platform and the URL or DOI for the eBook. Below are 2 examples, from the APA Blog, on how put this all together.

The second example contains a DOI, which is a Digital Object Identifier, and should always be used if available over a standard web address.

Key takeaway – even if you can’t find a specific referencing example for your resource on QUT Cite Write, you can build your own reference using parts from other examples. This goes for many referencing styles! However, if you are unsure about your referencing, you can always contact the library for assistance.

Have a tricky referencing question? Let us know know can add it to our Referencing Hack series!

How to Find Specialised Information

With assignments coming up everyone is looking for that perfect piece of information. Sometimes you cannot find this information in a journal article or a textbook and you have to look a little bit harder to find it.

To help you with finding this type of specialised information QUT Librarians have put together some handy How to find guides. These can help you find things such as cases, classroom and curriculum resources such as lesson plans, evidence based information, industry reports and market research, standards and even videos.

You can find the full list of our “How to find” guides from the QUT Library homepage.How to find information is located on the library homepage under the Databases and Specialised Search Tools box.

If you need further assistance to find information for your assignments, you can always contact the library. May the search for information be ever in your favor!

SAGE Higher Degree Research Student Publication Prize 2017

SAGE is offering cash prizes ($1500 First Prize, $900 Second Prize and $500 Third Prize) for the top three papers, accepted for publication, by a Higher Degree Research (HDR) student. You have until 14th September 2017 to enter, so sharpen those pencils! The awards will go to HDR students who are the lead author on a manuscript judged to be among the top three papers, and accepted by a peer reviewed journal, with a Q1 ranking in Scimago.  The paper must have been accepted between the 1st January 2017 and the 31st of August 2017.

To be eligible to enter, you must:

  1. Be a current QUT Higher Degree Research (HDR) Student (QUT MOPP).
  2. Be the lead author and have played a significant role in data collection, data analysis, and preparation of a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal, allocated a Quartile 1 (Q1) ranking in Scimago in any subject area, between 1st January 2017 and 31st August 2017; and
  3. Email library.research@qut.edu.au to advise of manuscript acceptance and publication details by 14th September 2017.

For the full terms and conditions and to apply, click here. If you’d like more information contact library.research@qut.edu.au.

Reading at University

Week 1 is over and university work is starting to kick in, this includes readings for each of your units.

Image of QUT Readings home page with the log in button on the right hand side of the top level menu highlighted in a yellow box with a yellow arrow pointing to it, saying click here.

The best place to access your readings is through your Blackboard Unit site. Under the Learning Resources tab you should be able to see QUT Readings. This will take you to the readings assigned for your unit and can include books, book chapters, journal articles, videos and lots more. You can access QUT Readings directly as well and search for a unit code as well as for past exam papers. Make sure when you are in QUT Readings that you click the log in button so that you can access all of the resources available. Visit QUT Library to find out more about how to find your readings and textbooks.

The first few weeks of university life can be overwhelming at times, especially with all of the readings you have to do before, after and during class. To assist you with doing your readings and to stop them from taking up all of your study time, QUT Library has put together a quick video to tell you about different strategies to use when reading such as skimming and scanning.

QUT Library has also put together a short workshop, Read it, Note it, Recall it, that you can access online anytime you like. This workshop gives you some more reading tips as well as some notetaking tips too! QUT has other online workshops available to assist with writing for university, researching for your assignments and referencing. You can access these online anytime you like.

If you have any questions about how to access your readings or need further assistance with reading strategies you can contact the library!

Who has been talking about your research? Altmetric Explorer knows.


Navigate the brave new world of alternative metrics (altmetrics) with Altmetric Explorer.

While traditional, citation-based metrics can take a significant amount of time to indicate the impact of research, altmetrics, that measure online attention, can give researchers a real-time indication of who is taking an interest in their research.

QUT researchers can now see who is talking about their research, and where.  Altmetric Explorer aggregates mentions of their works in a number of sources, including news outlets, blogs, policy documents, social media and Wikipedia, to calculate an ‘Attention Score’.  This is represented by a multi-coloured ‘doughnut’, where each colour corresponds to a type of source; the more colourful the doughnut the wider the reach.

You can use Altmetric Explorer to explore QUT’s publication data, or all research in the Altmetric database. Search by article title, keyword, researcher name, QUT faculty or school.  Currently, Altmetric Explorer only tracks QUT articles with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).  Register for an account in Altmetrics Explorer to access extra features.  So get ready to explore Altmetric Explorer and find out the colour of your ‘doughnut’. If you have any questions please contact your Liaison Librarian or Library Research Support.

Get your Research on at ResBaz!

Kickstart your research in 2017 with the Research Bazaar (ResBaz). It is on in Brisbane again this year and is hosted by The University of Queensland. ResBaz is an international festival celebrating digital literacies that are the foundation of modern research. It facilitates collaboration between early career researchers, PhD students, and researchers at other stages of their career using the next generation of digital research tools. You can learn from peers about the digital skills needed for cutting edge research in the 21st century!

There are several events happening in Brisbane throughout ResBaz including a Festival Day and a variety of workshops. Some of the information shared will be about OpenRefine and Web scrapers, bioinformatics as well as some Software Carpentry lessons.

For those able to get to Brisbane the details are as follows –

Where: University of Queensland, St Lucia campus (Advanced Engineering Building)

When: 7-9 February, 2017.

What: ResBaz includes several events and workshops. Registration for the market day is available and recommended. Registration for the workshops is essential.

For those who can’t to get to Brisbane, don’t worry! ResBaz is an international event and hosted in other locations around the globe so you can find a ResBaz location near you.

Can’t make it toResBaz? No worries, QUT Library offers research support to students. Check out QUT Library’s resources for researchers and the training and assistance we offer to all Higher Degree Research Students, other researchers and research support staff.

Delicious Ideas for Australia Day

Australia Day is just around the corner! One last public holiday before start of Semester 1. QUT Library is taking a break too with all campus libraries closed for the public holiday. See our opening hours for more information.

With the library closed make the most of your Australia Day this year by hanging out in the kitchen. It is no coincidence that your nice and cool fridge happens to be there too!

Here are our top 5 suggestions for having a delicious Australia Day –

  1. Who doesn’t love a barbeque? Do it a little different this year and check out Asian-Style Grilling.
  2. The Foodie’s Beer Book : The Art of Pairing and Cooking with Beer for Any Occasion, is sure to have some great tips and tricks to keep your day full of fun, not to mention yum!
  3. Don’t know how to cook? We have you covered with The “I Don’t Know How to Cook” Book : 300 Great Recipes You Can’t Mess Up!
  4. Simply Smoothies has 200 recipes and easily shows you how to make the perfect Australia Day smoothie to cool you down.
  5. And for desert ice cream sandwiches are the way to go! Try Cookies & Cream : Hundreds of Ways to Make the Perfect Ice Cream Sandwich.

If these suggestions don’t tickle your fancy, there are many more possibilities. QUT has lots of eBooks and videos that can help give you some inspiration for your Australia Day. Enjoy the public holiday and we look forward to seeing you back at QUT Library soon!