Patents Search – Tracking Innovation

Want to discover the latest breakthroughs of applied researchers in your field? Looking for practical solutions to real-world problems? Interested in device design drawings and detailed specifications?

You should search for patents that have been granted to inventors.  Need to know where to begin your patent search? Consult our library subject guide on patent searching. http://libguides.library.qut.edu.au/patents

Scientists, engineers and technologists often find their search of databases that index and contain the conventional, peer-reviewed literature fails to yield detail on cutting-edge innovation. They understand that to gain a more complete understanding of the state-of-the-art they need to expand their literature discovery by searching for registered patents.

What is a Patent?

A patent is a right granted to the inventor for a device, substance, method or process that is new when compared with what is already known. A patent protects new inventions and covers how things work, what they do, how they do it, what they are made of and how they are made. It gives the owner the right to prevent others from making, using, importing or selling the invention without permission. Patents are often granted for small, incremental improvements to a known technology. A patent is legally enforceable. It gives the inventor exclusive right to commercially exploit her / his invention for the life of the patent.

Patent Search for Beginners

Google Scholar search will include patents in your search results (by default). There is also a specialist Google Patents search interface. All the major patents offices have their own search engine and discovery platform.

When an invention or device is truly new, there is no established or agreed terminology to describe it. The inventor (usually via their attorney or agent) also have a vested interest in making their patent difficult to discover. Accordingly, you should also search for patents by class.

Patent Classification

Patent examiners typically classify an inventor’s application for a grant of patent into several classes, depending on that invention’s components and functions. Classification brings together similar devices and concepts, even when different terms have been used to describe the invention.

Classification systems provide a language independent search tool, one that embraces all domains of technology:

  • Patent classes are well-defined and scoped;
  • Patent classes are arranged in an ordered and logical fashion;
  • Patent classes are hierarchical. Classes are deconstructed into detailed sub-classes.

To conduct a thorough and comprehensive patent search you should search by class.

Learn More — Delve Deeper

QUT Library has a subject guide to help you navigate the patent process and that shows you how to discover patents.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *