O Week – What’s happening in the library?

Welcome!

QUT Library offers a range of orientation activities to help you prepare for Semester 2, whether you are new to QUT or returning for another semester.

Library Tours

This tour is much more than a walk around a building because QUT Library is so much more than just a building! Your Library has study spaces, services, resources and people to help you, both at your campus and online. During O Week, library tours are held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Gardens Point and Kelvin Grove. Tours depart from HiQ at:

  • 10am
  • 11am
  • 12pm
  • 1pm
  • 2pm

Referencing made simple

Referencing is an important skill that you must use at uni. This session introduces you to the principles and styles of referencing and citing using QUT cite|write. It also explains how you can paraphrase the work of others, avoid plagiarism, and make sure that your work has academic integrity.

Researching made easy

It’s easy to find information but getting the best scholarly information quickly is a skill. After this session, you will use databases more efficiently to find relevant information and current journal articles for your assignments.

Kelvin Grove Library

We look forward to welcoming you to QUT Library for Semester 2 and if you need help please contact us.

For more information about O Week, check out QUT orientation for students

Cooking up Success with Copyright!

Recently Librarians and Archivists from around Australia cooked their way to success! On the 15 June 2017 the Copyright Amendment (Disability Access and other Measures) Act was passed through Parliament with full support. This means that previously copyright protected documents such as diaries, letters and old recipes are no longer hidden away. They will be able to be made freely available to the public.

This massive reform was made possible by the Cooking for Copyright campaign launched in 2015 by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) as part of its FAIR (Freedom of Access to Information and Resources) initiative. Participants were encouraged to cook vintage recipes as a fun way to raise awareness about the need for copyright reform and to highlight the issues associated with perpetual copyright for unpublished materials.

Jessica Coates from the Australian Librarians Copyright Committee says “Even when notes or scribbles are hundreds of years old with no possible chance of tracking down descendants, they are still locked away due to copyright protections. This change means things like the diaries of Captain Cook or the letters of Jane Austen can be accessed and used by school kids, researchers and the general public.” You can find more information about the copyright success from the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee.

To celebrate this amazing achievement, QUT Library is hosting another Cooking for Copyright morning tea exactly two years after the first one. Here are all the details –

When – Monday 31st July at 10:30am

Where – QUT Gardens Point Library, V Block, Level 3, Activity Room

How – Please register for this event via EventBrite

More reform is needed to Australian copyright law to achieve the balance required for creators and users of copyright materials to participate in knowledge creation. Professor Matthew Rimmer, Professor, Intellectual Property and Innovation Law School, will speak to this issue.

From page to screen

Many books have been adapted for the screen over the years, and this trend isn’t over yet. QUT Library has many of these popular titles in a variety of formats, including as books, ebooks, DVDs and online videos. Visit our library website for tips on searching for feature films and TV series.

Filmstrip-92140__340 by geralt (CC0 Public Domain)

Why not check out these book titles which have inspired recent movies and TV series? These are all available through QUT Library.

Movies

TV series

 

NAIDOC Week – Our Languages Matter

2017 National NAIDOC logo

NAIDOC Week runs from the 2-9 July and celebrates the rich history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia. This year’s theme is ‘Our Languages Matter’ and hopes to emphasise the vital role Indigenous language plays in the cultural identity, spirituality for Indigenous Australians and in linking them to their land and water.

Today only about 120 languages from over 250 are still spoken and many are at risk of being lost. Each unique language carries with it stories, rites and knowledge so it is important they each one is preserved and maintained. Ms Anne Martin, National NAIDOC Committee Co-Chair has said,

“Each language is associated with an area of land and has a deep spiritual significance and it is through their own languages, that Indigenous nations maintain their connection with their ancestors, land and law.”

This NAIDOC Week why not learn about the languages that shaped Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Here are some of the resources available at QUT Library that can get you started on your language journey.