ANZAC Day 2017

On the 25th of April 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed on the beaches of Gallipoli in the First World War. Today, we acknowledge ANZAC day as a time for national remembrance and reflection to commemorate those who served or continue to serve in the Australian armed forces.

There are a wealth of resources available from QUT Library if you want to know more about ANZAC day and the legacy it has created, take a look at some of the videos we’ve selected below:

Making It Right: To mark Anzac Day, Kris Flanders travels to Adelaide and meets Indigenous war veterans who talk about entitlements and what it was like fighting on the front line

Anzac secrets: Many men and women came home from Gallipoli, put their medals away and tried to erase painful memories by not talking about them

Recognising the role of women in the Australian Defence Force: When Australia commemorates the Anzac centenary this weekend, most of the tributes will be paid to the thousands of men who died fighting

Referencing Hack #2 – Square vs Round Brackets

With QUT Legal referencing one of the more tricky concepts to navigate is whether you need to use square or round brackets when citing cases. Don’t worry, you are not alone! Here are some tips to help clear up some of the confusion so you know exactly what to cite.

Tip #1 Figure out what the abbreviation is to determine if it is from a reported legal series or an unreported judgment by looking at our Common Cases Abbreviation list. An unreported judgment’s abbreviation will often be a court of law, such as the QCA (Queensland Court of Appeal) or the FCA (Federal Court of Australia). A reported judgment means the case was published in a report series, such as the Commonwealth Law Reports or the Queensland Reports.

Tip #2 Reported Judgments with square brackets [2017] – The date within the square brackets is the year this case was published in the report series. It is also the volume number. If there is more then one part of a volume there will be a sequential number after the brackets, such as 1 or 2. A case may wait a few years before it is published so these report series’ may contain cases that were heard from a variety of years.The citation below shows that that the case can be found in volume 2016 of the Queensland Reports, part 1.

Tip #3 Reported Judgments with round brackets (2017) – The date within the round brackets is the year of the case’s judgment. Report series who use round brackets organise their volumes by a volume number, which can be found directly after the date in round brackets. The citation below shows that the case can be found in volume 256 of the Commonwealth Law Reports.

Tip #4 Unreported Judgments always have square brackets [2017] – If your abbreviation relates to a specific court of law then your citation is an unreported judgement otherwise known as a medium neutral citation. The date within the square brackets is the year of judgment. Remember, unreported judgments may also be published in a reported series, so make sure to keep an eye out for alternative citations.You should always cite using the most authoritative citation. More information about authoritative cases can be found on our Introduction to Case Law Guide. 

If you need further assistance with your referencing you can contact your friendly QUT Librarians for help.

Referencing Hack #1 – Edited eBooks

With assignments getting finalised, referencing is high on the To Do list. Over the next week or so we will be sharing our top tips for referencing to make completing your assignment that much easier.

The first tip we want to share is referencing a chapter in an edited eBook with QUT APA. Although there are no specific examples in QUT cite|write on how to do this, we recommend combining the references for Chapter in an Edited Book and Electronic Book (eBook) together. You keep the first half of the Chapter in an edited book example but when you get to the publishing details exchange them for the eBook details including the eBook platform and the URL or DOI for the eBook. Below are 2 examples, from the APA Blog, on how put this all together.

The second example contains a DOI, which is a Digital Object Identifier, and should always be used if available over a standard web address.

Key takeaway – even if you can’t find a specific referencing example for your resource on QUT Cite Write, you can build your own reference using parts from other examples. This goes for many referencing styles! However, if you are unsure about your referencing, you can always contact the library for assistance.

Have a tricky referencing question? Let us know know can add it to our Referencing Hack series!

How to Find Specialised Information

With assignments coming up everyone is looking for that perfect piece of information. Sometimes you cannot find this information in a journal article or a textbook and you have to look a little bit harder to find it.

To help you with finding this type of specialised information QUT Librarians have put together some handy How to find guides. These can help you find things such as cases, classroom and curriculum resources such as lesson plans, evidence based information, industry reports and market research, standards and even videos.

You can find the full list of our “How to find” guides from the QUT Library homepage.How to find information is located on the library homepage under the Databases and Specialised Search Tools box.

If you need further assistance to find information for your assignments, you can always contact the library. May the search for information be ever in your favor!