Happy Birthday Wikipedia!

Happy birthday Wikipedia! It’s hard to believe it has been 15 years since the website first launched on January 15, 2001.

See below for 15 interesting “Did you knows?” about Wikipedia:

  1. “Wiki” comes from the Hawaiian word meaning “quick”
  2. Over 5 million articles have been published in English so far
  3. Some languages supported by Wikipedia are: Esperanto, Latin, Swahili, Vietnamese, and Simple English
  4. The symbols on the Wikipedia logo are glyphs from a number of different writing systems in the world.
  5. Anyone can contribute to Wikipedia by creating an account
  6. The articles which feature a bronze star are considered to be some of the best articles in Wikipedia
  7. You can race your friends to see how many clicks does it take for you to get from Moby Dick to Kim Kardashian
  8. You can view a list of the recent changes to an article with the time and name of the editor
  9. Wikimedia is a non-profit organization with a number of projects including: Wikibooks, Wikiversity, Wikinews
  10. Being a Wikipedian in residence is a thing!
  11. Wikipedia relies solely on donations and volunteer contributors
  12. The majority of text and pictures on Wikipedia is covered by a Creative Commons license.
  13. You can put together a list of articles from Wikipedia to create your own book
  14. If you click on the “talk” tab of any article you can read a discussion on how best to improve the page
  15. Apparently it would take 16 years to read all of English Wikipedia

Follow the hastag #1lib1ref on Twitter to see what the librarians at QUT (and around the world) have been doing to celebrate this momentous occasion.

Sharing research data

Are you a QUT researcher? Make your datasets available, discoverable and accessible with Research Data Finder

Are you a QUT researcher? Make your datasets available, discoverable and accessible with Research Data Finder

QUT researchers can now make their datasets openly available, discoverable and accessible using QUT’s Research Data Finder. Researchers can easily self-deposit datasets, quickly describe and publicly share them with the broader research community, maximising opportunities for data re-use and ensuring compliance with funders and publishers.

Two examples where researchers have shared their dataset are below.  There is a link to the dataset at the top right corner in the Access the Data section.

Why share data?

Both the ARC and NHMRC encourage the dissemination of research data (Section C of ARC Discovery grants instructions to applicants).  The Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research states: “Researchers have a responsibility to their colleagues and the wider community to disseminate a full account of their research as broadly as possible.” [Section 4.4]

Public Library of Science (PLOS) and Nature journals require authors to make all data underlying the findings described in manuscripts fully available without restriction, with rare exception.

QUT’s Management of research data policy (MOPP D/2.8.7) advises that QUT ‘research data will be made available for access and re-use by other researchers subject to any contractual, ethical, privacy or confidentiality matters’.  The Guidelines for the Management of Research Data at QUT provide further details on all aspects of research data management including  access and re-use, access agreements, and a range of licences (copyright and Creative Commons).

Other benefits of sharing research datasets in Research Data Finder are:

  • An increase in citations by up to 69% (Piwowar & Vision, 2013)
  • Data is readily available for re-use when required
  • An improved research profile
  • Increased national and international opportunities for collaboration and innovation

Contact your Liaison Librarian for more information about depositing datasets into Research Data Finder