Referencing Hacks #6 – Numbered Images

Numbered referencing can be one tough cookie to crack. One particular question we get asked a lot is how to reference an image taken from the internet using QUT Numbered referencing. Have no fear! We have consulted the experts and this is the template we recommend.

[number] Author. Title of image [image on the Internet]. Date [cited date]. Available from: URL

Don’t have all of these pieces of information for your image? Here are some handy hints on how to navigate this.

  • No author? Check for an organisation or corporate author. If still none, omit this information
  • No date? Replace this section with [date unknown].
  • No title? Write a brief description of the image in square brackets and put this where the title would be.

Of course this only makes sense with some examples. Have a look at these to get more of an idea of what your numbered reference should look like for an image.

[1] Breath in cold air [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/breathing1.jpg

[2] Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Shingles on face [image on the Internet]. 2011 [cited 2017 Aug 22]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/photos.html

[3] Wisegeek. [Exterior view of ear with dry skin] [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-do-i-treat-dry-skin-in-the-ears.htm#

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.

Choose the right journal for your research via Think Check Submit

Quality is key to selecting the right journal to publish in and avoiding predatory publisher traps can be difficult.  In response to the problems of deceptive journals and conferences, a collection of publishers, publishing ethics groups, open access groups and academic libraries created Think Check Submit.

The campaign helps researchers identify trusted journals for their research via a simple checklist to assess the credentials of a journal or publisher.

Start the check by asking yourself some questions including:

  • Do you or your colleagues know the journal?
    – Have you read any articles in the journal before?
    – Is it easy to discover the latest papers in the journal?
  • Is the journal clear about the type of peer review it uses?
  • Are articles indexed in services that you use?

Watch the short video for more details:

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Think Check Submit is now available in seventeen languages including Arabic, Chinese, Indonesian, Spanish and Thai.

Want to know more about how to choose journals to publish in?  Contact your Liaison Librarian and check out the Which journal? advice from QUT Library.

Finding Information #1 – Quickfind Advanced Search

Did you know that QUT Library’s Quickfind searches over 80% of all the resources available at QUT? If you are looking for a book, journal article, report or newspaper article this is a great first place to look!

Quickfind’s Advanced Search can help you find information you need efficiently. You can find the Advanced Search underneath the Quickfind Search Bar.

QUT Library Homepage with advanced search icon highlighted.

Once you are in the Advance Search screen type your keywords into the search boxes. To search efficiently, put each concept or keyword on a different line and choose the right Search Operators to separate the lines. After you’ve entered your keywords you can refine your results further by selecting certain publication years to look at or by choosing the content type you want to focus on, such as articles or books. Advanced Search also allows you to select peer reviewed sources as another option to refine your results. By refining your search using the Advanced Search you will save time and get to relevant results faster, woo!

Here are our top tips to get the most out of advanced searches –

  1. Speak the database’s language. Figure out your keywords and synonyms first and how link them with search operators used by the database so it can understand exactly what you are looking for.
  2. Look for ‘search tips’ or ‘help’ buttons within the database to identify your database’s preferred search operators.
  3. Don’t be afraid to change your search strategy. Look in your results for other keywords or synonyms you can use and try different keywords and combinations.
  4. Try new things. Change the field you are searching in. If you are getting too many results from searching All Fields, try searching for your keywords just within the abstract, or look for a particular author.

Contact your information experts for more assistance with using Quickfind’s Advanced Search.

Referencing Hack #5 – Legal Dictionaries

Legal referencing can be tricky. One question the library sees often is how to cite a legal dictionary. After collaborating with law academics this is what we suggest when referencing an online legal dictionary with QUT Legal

Your footnote must contain:

1. Name of the publisher, title of the legal dictionary, (date of last update of the defined term or if that is not available then date of retrieval preceded by ‘at’), ‘name of defined term’ (name of related area of law) [pinpoint reference as a paragraph number, if one exists].

Here is our example –

  1. LexisNexis, Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary (at 9 August 2016), ‘Council’ (Environment) [1].

Is this how you cite a printed legal dictionary too, you ask? For paper legal dictionaries cite according to AGLC3 as if it was a book. And remember to always keep an eye on your punctuation.

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Children’s Book Week 2017

The theme for Children’s Book Week 2017 is Escape to Everywhere.

Each year in Australia, The Children’s Book Council of Australia brings children and books together in celebrating Children’s Book Week.

Kelvin Grove Library is supporting this event with a wonderful display of all the shortlisted and winning books from The Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Awards. The winners will be announced and published on their website on Friday 18th August.

Check out the shortlisted books in each category. Awards are presented in the following categories:

  • Book of the Year: Older Readers (For ages 13-18 years)
  • Book of the Year: Younger Readers (For ages 8-12 years)
  • Book of the Year: Early Childhood (For pre and beginning readers)
  • Picture Book of the Year (Can be for any age)
  • Eve Pownall Award for Information Books (For ages 0-18 years)

You can borrow these from QUT Library’s Curriculum Collection, which is located on Level 4 of Kelvin Grove Library. To read the shortlisted and winning books, just visit the Children’s Literature Library Subject Guide and follow the links to QUT Library’s online and print copies.

National Science Week – Let’s get Robo-coding!

National Science Week is here from the 12-20th August. QUT is celebrating this year by welcoming Robotronica back to QUT’s Gardens Point campus to reveal the most up to date advancements and innovations in the fields of robotics and interactive design.

Get interactive and learn to program a robot at the Cubes Code-a-Robot.  Stretch your mind and hear from Professor Ron Arkin about all the sneaky things robots can do and the ethical and moral implications of this. Plus, you can meet Pepper!

Pepper the Robot meeting people

Robotronica is a one day only event to finish National Science Week off with a bang so make sure you mark it in your diaries.

Can’t wait until Robotronica to learn more about robotics and interactive design? Have a look at QUT Library’s Robotics and Mechatronics Library Subject Guide to get your innovative juice flowing.

Make sure to let us know what science inspired things you are up to this National Science Week at @QUTLibrary and using #natsciwk.

Library Opening Hours and Ekka Holidays

Due to Public Holidays for the Royal Queensland Show (the Ekka):

  • Caboolture Library will be closed on Monday 14th August, for the Moreton Bay Region’s Ekka Holiday. (Caboolture Library will be open normal hours on Wednesday 16th August.)
  • The Gardens Point, Kelvin Grove and Law Libraries will be open on Wednesday 16th August but for a shorter day. GP and KG will be open from 9am to 5pm, Law will be open from 10am to 5pm.
  • Online Chat with a Librarian will be available between 9am and 5pm on Wednesday 16th August.

For more information, see QUT Library Opening hours

EKKA by Cozzie1996 (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Paperbark: First Nation Narratives with Aunty Lesley Williams

Join us at QUT Library for Paperbark: First Nation Narratives with Aunty Lesley Williams.

This event is part of celebrating Murri-Ailan Way 2017 @ QUT. Seats are limited so register your attendance. Tea and coffee will be provided from 10:30 am, with author discussion from 11:00 am.

About the author:

Aunty Lesley Williams, a respected Aboriginal Elder, is the co-author of Not Just Black and White: A conversation between a mother and daughter. This book was the winner of both the David Unaipon Award and the Queensland Premier’s Award for a work of State Significance. Told with honesty and humour the book is an extraordinary memoir about two women determined to make sure history is not forgotten.

Library orientation – Need help?

For help with library services check out the Need help? section of the QUT Library website.

Here you will find information about visiting and contacting the library.

Visit HiQ on campus for library support, including help accessing information, referencing and using library materials.

You can also Chat online with a librarian to have your questions about QUT Library services answered.

Need more help?
Here there are links to Study skills workshops, including library workshops on referencing and researching. For individual assistance with your academic study you can book a Study Solutions consultation.