Virtual Reality in the Library

QUT Library at Kelvin Grove will be showcasing our Virtual Reality resources during Week 13. Try various VR headsets including Oculus Rift, PlayStation and Voxkin , and discover the wide range of VR content available to you from the Library!

Come and join us in the Games Lab on Level 4 and HiQ Level 2 on Wednesday 25th and Thursday 26th of October between 1pm-3pm.

Can’t make it to the library then? We have you covered! Our Games Lab is open the same time as HiQ so you can pop in and play the PS4 and Xbox One to your hearts content. Plus we have a whole bunch of games available for you to play and borrow.

Hopefully we will see you for some fun with virtual reality or maybe borrowing some games!

Why Open Access is so important?

As students, researchers and staff at QUT we go about our studies, research and work often not really thinking about where our information and resources for assignments and research come from. In many cases it’s not until we have trouble with a link to a full-text journal article that we even consider the prospect of not being able to access what we are looking for.  We take it for granted that if we can’t access that article, we can get someone at the library to find it for us, or we can use the library’s document delivery service to have the article sent directly to us.

But what if we didn’t have such easy access to articles, what if we had to pay every time we clicked on the full text link? Well, the simple answer is we do pay; QUT Library provides access to subscriptions to the world’s top academic journals and databases to ensure that we have the best and latest research available at our fingertips.  Most of these articles sit behind a pay wall and aren’t open access.

The main argument for open access to scholarly publishing is that if most research is undertaken by publically funded universities (like QUT), why then should those same institutions then have to pay again, at the library level, to access that research?   And why should this information only be shared with others who can pay for it?  The restrictive practices in traditional academic publishing constrain the growth, reach, visibility, accessibility and impact of information.   This not only stifles innovation and world knowledge, it limits the contribution to research by developing countries who can’t afford subscription costs.

Open Access is important because it benefits everyone. From researchers whose work benefits through increased collaboration and sharing, to communities who benefit from the accelerated pace of discovery.

QUT has been a key innovator in advocating for open access and was the first university to mandate open access to its scholarly work in 2003. QUT’s ePrints is the highest ranked Australian repository  according to Webometrics.  QUT also  hosts the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) which works across the region to advocate, collaborate, raise awareness, and help build capacity in open access. Creative Commons Australia is also based at QUT and provides free licences and tools that copyright owners can use to allow others to share, reuse and remix their material, legally.  QUT library, the AOASG and Creative Commons Australia can provide advice to QUT researchers on all aspects of open access.

During International Open Access week (23-29th Oct) QUT Library will be hosting a number of events and is delighted Heather Joseph, the Executive Director of Scholarly Publishing and Research Coalition (SPARC), an important US based advocacy group will be visiting QUT.

Monday 23rd Oct  2-4pm  – Open Access Bizarre Bazaar – GP-Z1064

Tuesday 24th Oct 1-3pm – Wikipedia Editing Workshop – KG Library

Wednesday 25th Oct 8:15-10am – Brisbane Tri-University event 

Friday 27th Oct 10-11:30am – The Power of Open: International Policy and Practice with Heather Joseph from SPARC – GP-Z1064

 

 

 

Referencing Hack #7 – Referencing work quoted by someone else with QUT APA

Referencing an author you read quoted in a book or article by a completely different author can be tricky. Ideally you should find the original source of the quotation but this may not always be possible. But if you can’t, no worries, QUT Library is here to help with our next Referencing Hack!

To reference an author quoted in another work in your reference list, you only need to provide a reference for the source you actually read. This is known as the “secondary source” because it is one step removed from the original source of the idea or quotation. Don’t reference the original source if you haven’t read it yourself, this is a big referencing no-no. In the text of your assignment you need to cite the original author but add the prefix “as cited in” along with the citation for the secondary source after the original authors surname.

Here is an example of how to reference this type of information in the text of your assignment –

Image of an example in text citation. The example is a short quote that reads, according to Rowling open round bracket as cited in Jones 2015 page 301 close round bracket, the Dursleys were open quotation mark were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. Close quotation mark.

The secondary source is Jones (the text you actually read) so Jones is the resource that will appear in the reference list.

For your reference list only include the secondary source information, like so –

Image of an example of an entry in a reference list. The example is author of work which is Jones, F. Year of publication which is Open bracket 2015 close bracket. Title of book which is Juxtapositions of magic and suburbia in late twentieth century fiction. Place of publication which is New York, New York. Publisher which is Powell.

Check QUT Cite|Write APA for how to reference a book, journal article or other types of sources your secondary source might be. Plus you can find more information about referencing authors quoted in another author’s other work in QUT Cite|Write. Just go to the bottom of the page under “need help with” and look for further information on Authors.

Don’t forget to check out our other Referencing Hacks for help with your referencing! Or contact us for further assistance.

Odd socks day…because everyone can have an odd day!

On Friday 6th October put on your odd socks and to help remove the stigma surrounding mental health with Odd Socks Day! Stigma associated with mental illness is one of the biggest barriers to people looking for help. By wearing odd socks you can show your support, plus look great while doing it!

Mental illness has far reaching effects, even if you are not the one in five Australians who might experience it you cannot evade its impact for long. Whether you know someone who is suffering or are suffering yourself there is no condemnation for reaching out for help. Everyone will face the consequences of mental illness at some point, whether financial, social or emotional. QUT offers a lot of support including personal support and counselling as well as financial help and support.

QUT Library also has many resources available so you can learn more about mental health. Whether you are curious, want to support someone or need some advice, you can stay informed with these mental health books, ebooks and videos.

So this Friday make sure to wear your odd socks and share it with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram #oddsocksday because everyone can have an odd day!

Different socks

Information Searching #3 – Lexis Advance

For those who have to do legal research you may be familiar with Lexis Advance, previously known as Lexis Nexis. Legal research can be a daunting prospect but Lexis Advance’s new design has lots of handy little tricks that can give you a leg up on your legal research. Here are our Law Librarians top tips for getting started with Lexis Advance.

  1. Advanced Search – This is where all the old search forms from Lexis Nexis have gone including Cases and Legislation. These advanced search forms allow you make your search more specific. For example you can search for cases related to a provision of legislation or for legislation that contains a defined term. 
  2. Analytical Materials – This is what all secondary sources in Lexis Advanced are called and this includes dictionaries, encyclopaedias, journal articles and commentaries. Use the Advanced Search form for Analytical Material to search throughout all secondary sources. Or locate the full list of Analytical Materials for Australia by selecting the Browse button at the top of the screen > Publications > Australia > By Content Type > AU Analytical Materials. 
  3. Search Everything – This button is located next to the main, red search box and is very powerful! If you click on it options appear for narrowing your search. This includes jurisdictions and content such as cases, legislation, analytical materials and forms and precedents. You can also narrow by legal topics and any recent publication or searches you have looked at. 
  4. Favourites – Add your most used searches or publications to your favourites box so you can easily access them. This is one of the best parts about Lexis Advance! You can do this by clicking the star next to the publication title either when in the publication itself or by looking at the Recent & Favourites tab under the Search Everything button. Once the star is yellow it’s a favourite, yay! And you can access it from the home page of Lexis Advance.

For more assistance with legal research pop into the Gardens Point Law Library on Level 5 of C Block or contact us! 

Referencing Hacks #6 – Numbered Images

Numbered referencing can be one tough cookie to crack. One particular question we get asked a lot is how to reference an image taken from the internet using QUT Numbered referencing. Have no fear! We have consulted the experts and this is the template we recommend.

[number] Author. Title of image [image on the Internet]. Date [cited date]. Available from: URL

Don’t have all of these pieces of information for your image? Here are some handy hints on how to navigate this.

  • No author? Check for an organisation or corporate author. If still none, omit this information
  • No date? Replace this section with [date unknown].
  • No title? Write a brief description of the image in square brackets and put this where the title would be.

Of course this only makes sense with some examples. Have a look at these to get more of an idea of what your numbered reference should look like for an image.

[1] Breath in cold air [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/breathing1.jpg

[2] Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Shingles on face [image on the Internet]. 2011 [cited 2017 Aug 22]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/photos.html

[3] Wisegeek. [Exterior view of ear with dry skin] [image on the Internet]. [date unknown] [cited 2017 Sept 11]. Available from: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-do-i-treat-dry-skin-in-the-ears.htm#

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!

Finding Information #2 – Searching PubMed

PubMed is a freely available version of the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE database and also provides access to some additional content not selected for MEDLINE. PubMed doesn’t contain full-text articles, but may link to publishers’ websites and other resources

Access PubMed via QUT Library’s Databases and specialised search tools. You can then select Health or view all databases to find the PubMed link. When you connect to PubMed, using your QUT login details, and search for information a QUT Fulltext Finder link may appear. This allows you to check if a fulltext copy of an article is available via QUT Library.

Simple steps for searching PubMed:

  1. Identify your search terms for each of your main concepts
  2. Perform a simple search by entering terms in the PubMed search box
  3. Include terms from the controlled vocabulary MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  4. Use the advanced search to see your search history and combine searches
  5. Apply limits to your search results using the filters sidebar

PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping which automatically searches for phrases and MeSH terms. Check for successful mapping to MeSH terms by viewing the “Search details” box on your Search results page.

For more help searching PubMed, check out the comprehensive online PubMed Tutorial.

Choose the right journal for your research via Think Check Submit

Quality is key to selecting the right journal to publish in and avoiding predatory publisher traps can be difficult.  In response to the problems of deceptive journals and conferences, a collection of publishers, publishing ethics groups, open access groups and academic libraries created Think Check Submit.

The campaign helps researchers identify trusted journals for their research via a simple checklist to assess the credentials of a journal or publisher.

Start the check by asking yourself some questions including:

  • Do you or your colleagues know the journal?
    – Have you read any articles in the journal before?
    – Is it easy to discover the latest papers in the journal?
  • Is the journal clear about the type of peer review it uses?
  • Are articles indexed in services that you use?

Watch the short video for more details:

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Think Check Submit is now available in seventeen languages including Arabic, Chinese, Indonesian, Spanish and Thai.

Want to know more about how to choose journals to publish in?  Contact your Liaison Librarian and check out the Which journal? advice from QUT Library.

Finding Information #1 – Quickfind Advanced Search

Did you know that QUT Library’s Quickfind searches over 80% of all the resources available at QUT? If you are looking for a book, journal article, report or newspaper article this is a great first place to look!

Quickfind’s Advanced Search can help you find information you need efficiently. You can find the Advanced Search underneath the Quickfind Search Bar.

QUT Library Homepage with advanced search icon highlighted.

Once you are in the Advance Search screen type your keywords into the search boxes. To search efficiently, put each concept or keyword on a different line and choose the right Search Operators to separate the lines. After you’ve entered your keywords you can refine your results further by selecting certain publication years to look at or by choosing the content type you want to focus on, such as articles or books. Advanced Search also allows you to select peer reviewed sources as another option to refine your results. By refining your search using the Advanced Search you will save time and get to relevant results faster, woo!

Here are our top tips to get the most out of advanced searches –

  1. Speak the database’s language. Figure out your keywords and synonyms first and how link them with search operators used by the database so it can understand exactly what you are looking for.
  2. Look for ‘search tips’ or ‘help’ buttons within the database to identify your database’s preferred search operators.
  3. Don’t be afraid to change your search strategy. Look in your results for other keywords or synonyms you can use and try different keywords and combinations.
  4. Try new things. Change the field you are searching in. If you are getting too many results from searching All Fields, try searching for your keywords just within the abstract, or look for a particular author.

Contact your information experts for more assistance with using Quickfind’s Advanced Search.

Referencing Hack #5 – Legal Dictionaries

Legal referencing can be tricky. One question the library sees often is how to cite a legal dictionary. After collaborating with law academics this is what we suggest when referencing an online legal dictionary with QUT Legal

Your footnote must contain:

1. Name of the publisher, title of the legal dictionary, (date of last update of the defined term or if that is not available then date of retrieval preceded by ‘at’), ‘name of defined term’ (name of related area of law) [pinpoint reference as a paragraph number, if one exists].

Here is our example –

  1. LexisNexis, Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary (at 9 August 2016), ‘Council’ (Environment) [1].

Is this how you cite a printed legal dictionary too, you ask? For paper legal dictionaries cite according to AGLC3 as if it was a book. And remember to always keep an eye on your punctuation.

You can view more referencing hacks from QUT Library and if you need assistance, contact your referencing experts!