Worried your emails might be spied on? Here’s what you can do

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This post authored by Dr. Monique Mann originally appeared on The Conversation on Tuesday 11 October 2016. 

We live in a post-Edward Snowden world, in which US tech companies have been accused of complicity in mass surveillance by the US National Security Agency (NSA). One recent allegation is the claim that Yahoo scanned hundreds of millions of emails at the NSA’s request.

We don’t truly know how much or how often this is happening within the companies that host millions of people’s email accounts. Read more

Recently Published: “As surveillance gets smart, hackers get smarter”

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This post authored by CJRC researcher Dr. Monique Mann and School of Justice PhD candidate Michael Wilson originally appeared on The Conversation on Thursday July 28, 2016.

There is an escalating technological arms race underway between governments and hacktivists. As governments step up their surveillance, the hacktivists find new ways to subvert it.

This cat and mouse game has been described as a crypto war and it’s been going on for decades.

Top secret documents released by Edward Snowden confirmed the extent of global internet surveillance by government agencies. For example, the United States National Security Agency (NSA) obtained access to systems maintained by tech companies and intercepted undersea cables to monitor global internet traffic. Read more

Recently Published: “Why the victim can also become the offender in online fraud”

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This post authored by Dr Cassandra Cross from QUT originally appeared on The Conversation on Wednesday 13th April 2016.  

It’s bad enough when someone loses money to an online scam, but in some cases the victim can also recruit others into the scam causing even further heartache and loss. Read more

Fraudsters change tactics as a crackdown cuts some losses due to online scams

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This post authored by Dr Cassandra Cross from QUT originally appeared on The Conversation on Tuesday March 1, 2016.  

The amount of financial loss from online fraud suffered by people in Western Australia has almost halved, dropping from A$16.8 million in 2014 to A$9.8 million for 2015, according to a statement this January from the state’s Attorney General and Minister for Commerce, Michael Mischin. Read more

“Boiler room scams destroy lives yet police blame victims” by Dr Cassandra Cross

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This post authored by Dr Cassandra Cross from QUT originally appeared on The Conversation on Friday November 13, 2015.  

Queensland’s Gold Coast has the dubious reputation of being the nation’s investment fraud capital, particularly for boiler room scams, a fact supported by the Queensland Organised Crime Commission of Inquiry.

The Inquiry estimated that Australians lose tens (possibly even hundreds) of millions of dollars each year to boiler room scams. While prosecutions have been successful, fraudulent companies are able to disappear and reappear under a different name overnight, presenting challenges for all law enforcement bodies. It also is difficult for potential victims to identify the fictitious nature of their potential investment.

Despite this, the commission has found there is a disturbingly strong victim blaming mentality expressed by police towards those who have fallen for, and lost money in such schemes.

Yet this depiction is problematic and largely inaccurate. Read more

QUT’s Professor John Scott on The Conversation: “The rise and fall of Rentboy.com”

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Professor John Scott from QUT’s School of Justice has co-authored an article that was recently featured on The Conversation. The article discusses the recent arrest of a number of people in the US for their use of Rentboy.com — a website used by male sex workers to advertise services and connect with clients.

With prostitution being illegal in the US (except for a few counties in Nevada), authorities claim those who use Rentboy.com are engaging in unlawful activity. However, with an online existence of almost two decades, it is interesting that Rentboy.com has been the recent target of such a large-scale investigation. Particularly when there are an infinite number of sex work websites and services available in the US that continue to operate everyday.

To read the full article, click here.