Policing in the South Pacific: University of the South Pacific

 

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Image 1:  John Scott with members of the USP Policing Program, Danielle Watson and Casandra Harry

Image 2:  Vice Chancellor of the University of the South Pacific, Professor Rajesh Chandra

CJRC member and Acting Head of School of Justice at QUT, Professor John Scott, recently visited the University of the South Pacific’s main Fiji campus where he engaged with staff in the School of Social Sciences about a number of ongoing initiatives in the space of southern criminology. In particular, QUT staff, and staff of the Pacific Policing Program, USP, are collaborating on projects  looking at policing in the Pacific, and the ecology of crime in island communities.

The Discipline Coordinator of the USP Policing program, Dr Danielle Watson is an Adjunct with the School of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Recently published: Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms

Molly Dragiewicz, Jean Burgess, Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Michael Salter, Nicolas P. Suzor, Delanie Woodlock & Bridget Harris recently published Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms. Feminist Media Studies, 18(4), 609–625. https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2018.1447341

This article is part of a special issue of Feminist Media Studies on Online Misogyny, edited by Debbie Ging and Eugenia Siapera. Read more

Recently published: Resistance and backlash to gender equality: An evidence review

Crime and Justice Research Centre members Associate Professor Michael Flood and Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Deakin University Honorary Professor Bob Pease recently published Resistance and backlash to gender equality: An evidence review Read more

Professor John Scott keynote at Indian National Justice Conference

Professor Scott is presented with gifts by Professor Sibnath Deb, Dean of Law, Pondicherry University.

Professor John Scott has recently returned from Puducherry (a part of French India until 1954), India where he presented a keynote conference paper on the theme of ‘Southern criminology and cognitive justice’.  The two day conference, organized by the School of Law, Pondicherry University (A Central University), examined The Role of Law Enforcement Authorities and Government in Upholding Justice. Distinguished presenters at the national conference included Justice N. Santosh Hegde (Former Judge, Supreme Court of India), Justice Indira Banerjee (Chief Justice of Madras High Court, Chennai), Justice Ravi R. Tripathi (Law Commission, Government of India) and Mr. V. Narayanswamy (Chief Minister, Puducherry Union Territory).  Scott made the case for a globally inclusive criminology noting that Australian, US and British textbooks ignored crime in the Subcontinent. This was especially striking in the case of Australia and Britain given the shared legal, social and political history. He argued that the extent of neglect exposed a bias in the way in which criminological knowledge was produced and disseminated and discussed the historic development of criminology in India and its growth over the last few decades. Major themes of the conference included access to justice, human rights, the role of police and political corruption. Approximately 200 people attended the conference.

 

New Book Series: Perspectives on Law, Crime and Justice from the Global South

Academic perspectives on crime, law and justice have generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to uncritically reproduce concepts and arguments developed elsewhere to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking leading to a burgeoning body of new work. This new book series aims to publish and promote this innovative new scholarship, with a long term view of bridging global divides and enhancing cognitive justice. The editors are especially keen to solicit manuscripts from authors from South America, Oceania, and South Africa.

Series Editors: Kerry Carrington Máximo Sozzo

submit manuscript proposals to kerry.carrington@qut.edu.au

INTRODUCING NEW BOOK SERIES: Routledge Studies in Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South Call for Proposals

Crime and justice studies, as with much social science, has concentrated mainly on problems in the metropolitan centres of the Global North, while Asia and the Global South have remained largely invisible in criminological thinking. Routledge is now accepting proposals for a brand new research series which aims to redress this imbalance by showcasing exciting new ways of thinking and doing crime and justice research from the global periphery. Edited by John Scott and Russell Hogg or Queensland University of Technology and by Wing Hong Chui of City University of Hong Kong, the series provides an opportunity to illustrate the work of emerging and established scholars who are challenging traditional paradigms in the fields of crime and justice. Bringing together scholarly work from a range of disciplines, from criminology, law, and sociology to psychology, cultural geography and comparative social sciences, the series will offer grounded empirical research and fresh theoretical approaches and cover a range of pressing topics, including international corruption, drug use, environmental issues, sex work, organized crime, innovative models of justice, and punishment and penology.

Please contact John Scott (j31.scott@qut.edu.au), Russell Hogg (russell.hogg@qut.edu.au), Wing Hong Chui (eric.chui@cityu.edu.hk) for more details, or alternatively Tom Sutton (Thomas.Sutton@tandf.co.uk) , Senior Editor for Criminology at Routledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call for papers – Southern Criminology Workshop, Argentina  7-9 Nov 2018

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Southern Criminology Workshop 7-9 N0VEMBER 2018
SANTA FE, ARGENTINA
Co-Hosted by the Faculty of Social and Juridical Sciences, National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina and the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Academic knowledge about crime, law and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape –particularly, the English speaking world. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to reproduce concepts and arguments developed there to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking.
This three day workshop set in the ideal location of Santa Fe, Argentina brings together scholars from across the globe to contribute to this task of de-colonising knowledge about crime, law and justice. The workshop aims to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges.

The workshop will be convened in three languages; Portuguese, Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, an open access journal.

Abstracts of 250 words are invited in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
Abstracts Due: 31 May 2018
Early submission of abstracts is advised as the workshop will be limited to 100.
Email to: delitoysociedad@unl.edu.ar

 

Winners Announced for CJRC Postgraduate Scholarships in Southern Criminology

The Crime and Justice Research Centre, Faculty of Law, QUT, have announced the winners of the Postgraduate Scholarships in Southern Criminology.

This was an extremely competitive round with many high-quality applications received from Australia and around the world. In this round, separate scholarships were available for QUT and non-QUT postgraduate students.  Read more

Latest Special Edition of International Journal of Crime, Justice & Social Democracy – Available Now!

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The International Journal of Crime, Justice & Social Democracy has just released the first issue for 2017 which is a special edition on Southern Criminology.

Knowledge is a commodity and knowledge production does not occur in a geo-political vacuum. The geo-politics of knowledge is unequally skewed, privileging the global north – Anglophone social sciences. Southern criminology as a democratising project aims to address this. This special issue provides a space for interaction between diverse global voices – read on and share widely. Its free to download. Read more