Professor John Scott keynote at Indian National Justice Conference

Professor Scott is presented with gifts by Professor Sibnath Deb, Dean of Law, Pondicherry University.

Professor John Scott has recently returned from Puducherry (a part of French India until 1954), India where he presented a keynote conference paper on the theme of ‘Southern criminology and cognitive justice’.  The two day conference, organized by the School of Law, Pondicherry University (A Central University), examined The Role of Law Enforcement Authorities and Government in Upholding Justice. Distinguished presenters at the national conference included Justice N. Santosh Hegde (Former Judge, Supreme Court of India), Justice Indira Banerjee (Chief Justice of Madras High Court, Chennai), Justice Ravi R. Tripathi (Law Commission, Government of India) and Mr. V. Narayanswamy (Chief Minister, Puducherry Union Territory).  Scott made the case for a globally inclusive criminology noting that Australian, US and British textbooks ignored crime in the Subcontinent. This was especially striking in the case of Australia and Britain given the shared legal, social and political history. He argued that the extent of neglect exposed a bias in the way in which criminological knowledge was produced and disseminated and discussed the historic development of criminology in India and its growth over the last few decades. Major themes of the conference included access to justice, human rights, the role of police and political corruption. Approximately 200 people attended the conference.

 

Publication: “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep – the Hierarchy of Disaster” – Dr. Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published a new essay titled “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep.” Co-written with Dr Suzie Gibson of Charles Sturt University, the piece appears in Issue 229 of Overland Literary Journal:

https://overland.org.au/previous-issues/issue-229/essay-dean-biron-and-suzie-gibson/

Subtitled “The Hierarchy of Disaster,” the essay considers how human-made catastrophes are ordered so as to distinguish between worthy and unworthy victims. Commencing with a comparison of political and media responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US and the 1984 Bhopal tragedy in India, the essay considers how many traumatic occurrences are elided from the collective memory and justice is denied to those victims of disasters which occur beyond the “self-reverent gaze” of Western society. It concludes by suggesting that the starting point to diminishing this hierarchy, and in turn confronting the ubiquity of disaster itself, must be an ethical recalibration on the part of first world governments.

In recent months Dean has also published work in The Guardian, The Conversation, Popular Music and Society and Metro Screen Journal.

Dean is currently coordinating the QUT Justice undergraduate subject ‘Deviance.’

EVENT TONIGHT – “Equality in the Criminal System” Featuring CJRC Researcher Professor Kerry Carrington

Tonight the Australian Fabians are hosting an event in Brisbane at QUT Gardens Point Campus on ‘Equality in the Criminal System’.

This event will feature presentations by CJRC researcher Professor Kerry Carrington and Luke Thomson from the Inala Youth Service.

For more information about this event and to register, click here.

 

Recently published: Domestic Violence on #qanda: The ‘‘Man’’ Question in Live Twitter Discussion on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Q&A

mollyBurgess

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law and Professor Jean Burgess, Director of the QUT Digital Media Research Centre and Professor of Digital Media in the Creative Industries Faculty recently published: Domestic Violence on #qanda: The ‘‘Man’’ Question in Live Twitter Discussion on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Q&A in volume 28.1 of The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law.

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