Professor Reece Walters – ESC Conference, Sarajevo

Professor Reece Walters (Director, Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) is pictured above with Professor Gorazd Mesko (President of the European Society of Criminology) at this week’s ESC conference in Sarajevo. Reece has been an International Partner Investigator with Professor Mesko on a Euro$770,000 project examining Water Crimes in Europe funded by the European Commission. This research will be published in a forthcoming book entitled Water, Governance and Crime. Reece has also presented a paper at the ESC as part of special panel on Southern Criminology chaired by QUT Adjunct Professor Maximo Sozzo. Reece’s paper was based on a chapter co-authored with QUT Adjunct Professors Nigel South and Avi Brisman and published in the Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and Global South edited by Kerry Carrington et al. Reece’s presentation focussed on the following:

The politics and conquests of the Global North have long necessitated the forced migration, colonization and ecological plunder of the Global South for imperial and capital expansionism. In recent decades, these excesses of accelerated industrialization have created new victims, with entire populations or “climate refugees” (Barnes and Dove 2015) or “environmental refugees” (Seelye 2001) dislocated by human-induced climate change. This presentation adopts Connell’s (2007) southern theory and Carrington and colleagues’ (2015) idea of a “southern criminology” to examine critically the notion of ‘climate apartheid’ and explore its impacts on the increasing number of individuals displaced by environmental harms.

Book: Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Centre – Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much

Professor Reece Walters, Director, CJRC, is one of the Series Editors and also a contributor to the recently released book series, Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Century – Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much. 

This series represents criminology’s first book-length contribution to the study of water and water-related crimes, harms and security. The chapters cover topics such as: water pollution, access to fresh water in the Global North and Global South, water and climate change, the commodification of water and privatization, water security and pacification, and activism and resistance surrounding issues of access and pollution. With examples ranging from Rio de Janeiro to Flint, Michigan to the Thames River, this original study offers a comprehensive criminological overview of the contemporary and historical relationship between water and crime.  Coinciding with the International Decade for Action, “Water for Sustainable Development,” 2018–2028, this timely volume will be of particular relevance to students and scholars of green criminology, as well as those interested in critical geography, environmental anthropology, environmental sociology, political ecology, and the study of corporate crime and state crime.

Further information can be found here – https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137529855

Call for Abstracts: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference 2019

The 5th biennial international conference hosted by the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology is being held 15-17 July 2019.

This conference seeks to further build on and innovate in new and imaginative areas of criminological thought.   This conference creates a globally connected space to enhance the dialogue between scholars and practitioners from the Global South and the Global North. The conference especially welcomes scholars from the global north – as a critical aim of the conference is to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project that will radically transnationalise the discipline into the future.

The conference is being convened at Broadbeach, a picturesque part of the Gold Coast in the south east corridor of Queensland, Australia. It has an international airport and is within close proximity to Asia and other parts of the Global South, as well as the beautiful beaches of the Gold Coast and its adjacent hinterland with rich and rare biodiversity.

Further information about the conference, including information on how to submit abstracts, can be found on the conference website

Research Showcase – Queensland Police Service

On the 8th March the Crime and Justice Research Centre was invite to deliver a Research Showcase at Queensland Police Service. The event, hosted by Frontline Research and information, Organisational Capability Command at QPS and facilitated by our QUT Police Fellow, Inspector Chris Emzin.

Four CJRC members: Professor Kerry Carrington, Dr Cassandra Cross, Dr Claire Ferguson and Associate Professor Mark Lauchs presented their work to the QPS cohort, to highlight and share work conducted at QUT.

Professor Carrington discussed the policing of gendered violence in the Global South, focusing on the innovative approach of women’s only police stations in Latin America and possible applications in the Australian context. Her ARC Discovery project with Professor Maximo Sozzo will explore the prevention of gendered violence; lessons from the Global South.

Dr Cross reflected on her work with online fraud which she began while working for the Queensland Police Service, and her Churchill Fellowship which extends this work and the challenges police and victims face when responding to fraud. She also outlined her current projects and future research directions in the field of cybercrime, digital crime, fraud and romance fraud.

Dr Ferguson spoke on her fascinating research and consultancy in the field of forensic criminology, offender evidence manipulation at homicide scenes, how police can combat these efforts and processes of determining death in complex cases. She outlined her research in Australian jurisdictions and beyond, on strategies offenders use and features police can use to combat these efforts.

Associate Professor Mark Lauchs’s presentation covered his work on organised crime and outlaw motorcycle groups. He summarised strategies researching these fields in Australia, with limited data in the public domain; how to redress knowledge gaps and explore the ‘organised’ component of crime as well as impacts on the community.

Thank you to the team and to Chris for facilitating what was, we hope, the first of a series of research events with Queensland Police. We look forward to exploring future research collaborations and initiatives with QPS.

 

Welcome Dr Laura Bedford

On Monday we welcomed Dr Laura Bedford as a new lecturer within the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, at QUT with a morning tea at The Gardens Café at Gardens Point.

Laura holds a PhD in Criminology, a MA in Economic History and a B. Soc Sci (Hons) in Political Science.  Laura has over 25 years experience in social and economic policy research and advocacy, working as a consultant and in senior roles in the public and private sector in South Africa and Australia.  Over the past two years, Laura has been employed by the Queensland Police Service as the lead researcher on a randomised controlled field trial which examined the impact of mobile technology on frontline policing.  Laura is currently interested in new directions in criminology, including the application of social and environment justice perspectives to problematise the translation of hegemonic criminological theory, and criminal justice practice, within the Global South.

We warmly welcome Laura to the team.

 

Discovery and DECRA success for the Crime and Justice Research Centre

We are delighted to announce the following successful ARC DECRA and DISCOVERY  successes.

Dr Angela Higginson has been awarded a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) entitled,  Ethnically Motivated Youth Hate Crime in Australia

Total Funding Amount: $344,996 over three years
 
Proposal Summary:
This project aims to provide the first assessment of youth hate crime in Australia, examine incidence rates over time, and explore how Australia’s experiences compare internationally. Hate crime can cause injury, psychological harm and social disengagement. For victims in early adolescence – a critical time of identity formation – the harms may be multiplied. The project will uncover the risk and protective factors for perpetration and victimisation, and for understanding the consequences for hate crime victims. This is expected to benefit the community by helping to inform social policy to improve the lives of Australia’s youth.

Out of 197 successful DECRA, only 2 were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Professor Kerry Carrington is the successful recipient of a Discovery grant entitled, Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south

Total Funding Amount: $228,951 over three years

Projects Summary:
Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south. This project aims to study the establishment of police stations for women in Argentina as a key element to preventing gendered violence. This project aims to discover the extent to which the Argentinian interventions prevent the occurrence of gendered violence, and identify aspects that could inform the development of new approaches to preventing gendered violence in Australia. Anticipated outcomes include knowledge critical to developing and implementing new ways to prevent gendered violence, with long-term benefits for national health, wellbeing and productivity.

Out of 594 successful Discovery Projects, only four were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Call for papers – Southern Criminology Workshop, Argentina  7-9 Nov 2018

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Southern Criminology Workshop 7-9 N0VEMBER 2018
SANTA FE, ARGENTINA
Co-Hosted by the Faculty of Social and Juridical Sciences, National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina and the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Academic knowledge about crime, law and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape –particularly, the English speaking world. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to reproduce concepts and arguments developed there to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking.
This three day workshop set in the ideal location of Santa Fe, Argentina brings together scholars from across the globe to contribute to this task of de-colonising knowledge about crime, law and justice. The workshop aims to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges.

The workshop will be convened in three languages; Portuguese, Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, an open access journal.

Abstracts of 250 words are invited in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
Abstracts Due: 31 May 2018
Early submission of abstracts is advised as the workshop will be limited to 100.
Email to: delitoysociedad@unl.edu.ar

 

Upcoming Seminar – “Prisons and State Building: Exporting ‘the Fiasco of the Prison’ to the Global South”

Next week, the Crime and Justice Research Centre will host a research seminar on “Prisons and State Building: Exporting ‘the Fiasco of the Prison’ to the Global South” with guest speaker Dr Deborah Drake from The Open University (UK)Read more

A knowledge network for the global south

The Queensland University of Technology’s Faculty of Law is hosting academics from Australia and Argentina to build knowledge networks between the two nations.

Despite sharing significant commonalities and facing a number of similar challenges, the links between Australia and Argentina, particularly where the exchange of knowledge is concerned, have been underdeveloped. Read more

CJRC Team Addresses Real World Issues in Justice in the Global South

As part of Crime and Justice Research Centre’s (CJRC) strategic goal of engagement with  the global south, a team from the Centre visited the Autonomous Region of Bougainville in Papua New Guinea last week, to engage members of the government in training workshops. Over a five day period, CJRC staff engaged over thirty government ministers and their staff in a series of policy development modules, with a core focus on justice issues which are impacting the islands of Bougainville. Read more