Recently Published – ““I’ve Lost Some Sleep over It”: Secondary Trauma in the Provision of Support to Older Fraud Victims

CJRC researcher and lecturer Dr Cassandra Cross from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, has recently published an article in the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice which examines experiences of secondary trauma for older fraud victims. Read more

Recently Published: “Exploring seniors’ attitudes towards identity crime”

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CJRC researcher Dr Cassandra Cross from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, has recently published an article in the Security Journal titled “‘But I’ve never sent them any personal details apart from my driver’s licence number…’: Exploring seniors’ attitudes towards identity crime”. Read more

Recently Published – ‘They’re Very Lonely’: Understanding the Fraud Victimisation of Seniors

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CJRC researcher Dr Cassandra Cross, from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, has recently published an article in the CJRC’s International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy. The article was included in the journal’s most recent issue (Vol 5, No 4) and looks at the fraud victimisation of seniors. Read more

Recently Published: “Why the victim can also become the offender in online fraud”

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This post authored by Dr Cassandra Cross from QUT originally appeared on The Conversation on Wednesday 13th April 2016.  

It’s bad enough when someone loses money to an online scam, but in some cases the victim can also recruit others into the scam causing even further heartache and loss. Read more

Fraudsters change tactics as a crackdown cuts some losses due to online scams

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This post authored by Dr Cassandra Cross from QUT originally appeared on The Conversation on Tuesday March 1, 2016.  

The amount of financial loss from online fraud suffered by people in Western Australia has almost halved, dropping from A$16.8 million in 2014 to A$9.8 million for 2015, according to a statement this January from the state’s Attorney General and Minister for Commerce, Michael Mischin. Read more

Recently Published: “The ACA effect: Examining how current affairs programs shape victim understandings and responses to online fraud”

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Dr Cassandra Cross and Dr Kelly Richards, both researchers in the Crime and Justice Research Centre, recently published an article in a special issue of Current Issues In Criminal Justice, guest edited by Dr Alyce McGovern of the University of New South Wales. The special edition, which focused on crime, media and new technologies, features a number of established and emerging scholars from Australia and abroad. Read more

“Boiler room scams destroy lives yet police blame victims” by Dr Cassandra Cross

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This post authored by Dr Cassandra Cross from QUT originally appeared on The Conversation on Friday November 13, 2015.  

Queensland’s Gold Coast has the dubious reputation of being the nation’s investment fraud capital, particularly for boiler room scams, a fact supported by the Queensland Organised Crime Commission of Inquiry.

The Inquiry estimated that Australians lose tens (possibly even hundreds) of millions of dollars each year to boiler room scams. While prosecutions have been successful, fraudulent companies are able to disappear and reappear under a different name overnight, presenting challenges for all law enforcement bodies. It also is difficult for potential victims to identify the fictitious nature of their potential investment.

Despite this, the commission has found there is a disturbingly strong victim blaming mentality expressed by police towards those who have fallen for, and lost money in such schemes.

Yet this depiction is problematic and largely inaccurate. Read more