Recently published: Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms

Molly Dragiewicz, Jean Burgess, Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Michael Salter, Nicolas P. Suzor, Delanie Woodlock & Bridget Harris recently published Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms. Feminist Media Studies, 18(4), 609–625. https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2018.1447341

This article is part of a special issue of Feminist Media Studies on Online Misogyny, edited by Debbie Ging and Eugenia Siapera. Read more

Publication: ‘A lightbulb moment’: Using the theory of planned behaviour to explore the challenges and opportunities for early engagement of Australian men who use violence in their relationships

 

 

 

 

 

CJRC member, Dr. Michael Flood has recently published an article in Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

 Forsdike, K., Tarzia, L., Flood, M., Vlais, R., and Hegarty, K. “‘A lightbulb moment’: Using the theory of planned behaviour to explore the challenges and opportunities for early engagement of Australian men who use violence in their relationships.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence, (2018). DOI: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260518780778

 Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a common complex social and public health problem. Interventions for IPV male perpetrators are an essential component of an early and effective response. Yet little is known about how to engage men in interventions for help-seeking. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), we explored men’s perceptions of seeking help for an unhealthy relationship and how they could be supported to recognize their behavior and undertake change at an early stage. We recruited 23 men who were currently attending a men’s behavior change program in Australia to take part in focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. The TPB concepts of behavioral beliefs, perceived control, and subjective norms were found throughout the data. Behavioral beliefs covered four subthemes: self-awareness, self-reflection and agency, the influence of others to change, and needing the right message in the right place. Perceived control was connected to these men’s understandings of what it means to be a man. Subjective norms were rarely raised, but there was some indication that men’s perceptions of societal norms about men as violent influenced a perceived lack of agency to change behavior. Our findings highlight the complexity of, and challenges in, engaging men who may use violence before they reach crisis point and justice intervenes. Despite this, participating men could find acceptable an appropriately developed and easy-to-access intervention that enhances recognition of behaviors and provides links to supports. Health professionals or researchers developing early interventions targeting these men need to take the engagement challenges into account.

 

QUT’s Graduate Certificate on Domestic Violence featured on ABC Focus

ABC Focus will run an episode on domestic violence education in Australia on 27 March 2018 at 12:00pm QLD time. The episode features JS12 Queensland University of Technology’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence and JSB286 Queensland University of Technology’s interdisciplinary undergraduate elective Domestic Violence.

Listen to the episode here 

Links to resources from the episode can be found here.

Workshop: Coercive Control

  1.  Kate Fitz-Gibbon
  2. Sandra Walklate
  3. Rachel Neil
  4. Refreshments following Coercive Control
  5. Book Launch – CJRC staff

Last week the Crime and Justice Research Centre and School of Justice hosted a workshop on ‘Coercive Control‘.  The purpose of this workshop was to examine the efficacy of the implementation of recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential for other jurisdictions.

The workshop panel discussed the concept of Coercive Control from different points of view and applications, giving the audience a well-rounded perspective on the topic.

Speakers included Kate Fitz-Gibbon, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University, and a member of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Research Program. Her research examines family violence, the law of homicide, youth justice and the impact of criminal law reform across Australian and international jurisdictions.

Rachel Neil is the Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS). Rachel is passionate about providing vulnerable women with high quality legal support and working towards a future where all women are free from violence.

Sandra Walklate is Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K.), co-joint Chair of Criminology at Monash University and an Adjunct Professor at the QUT School of Justice. She is currently Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2018 becomes president elect of the British Criminology Society. She is internationally recognised for her work on criminal victimisation (including terrorism) and gender and violence.

The event proved very popular with approximately 100 registered.

Following the event there was a celebration of books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members since 2016.

 

 

 

New Publication – Understanding Romance Fraud: Insights from Domestic Violence Literature

 Cassandra Cross, Molly Dragiewicz and Kelly Richards have recently had an article published in the British Journal of Criminology. The article is the first to examine romance fraud from within the framework of psychological abuse, as established in domestic violence research.

 Abstract

Romance fraud affects thousands of victims globally, yet few scholars have studied it. The dynamics of relationships between victims and offenders are not well understood, and the effects are rarely discussed. This article adapts the concept of psychological abuse from studies of domestic violence to better understand romance fraud. Using interviews with 21 Australian romance fraud victims, we show how offenders use non-violent tactics to ensure compliance with ongoing demands for money. This article identifies similarities and differences between domestic violence and romance fraud. We argue that thinking through domestic violence and romance fraud together offers potential benefits to both bodies of research.

 The full article can be found here

 

 

QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence in the news

The Sydney Morning Herald ran a story about graduate education about domestic violence in Australia. A new weapon in the fight against family violence by Jane Gilmore was published 20 March 2018. The article features quotes from QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence alumni. For more information about the units in the Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence click here.

ASSA grant success: ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ Workshop 2018

CJRC staff – Dr Bridget Harris and Professor Kerry Carrington, with Dr Delanie Woodlock and the Honourable Marcia Neave – have received funding from the Academy of Social Sciences Australia to host a workshop in August 2018, on ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ #DVTech18 #DVTech18QUT

Domestic violence is widely recognised as one of Australia’s most important social issues, with approximately one woman killed by her partner, weekly. This event will bring focus to an emerging trend in domestic violence: the use of technology to stalk and abuse victim/survivors. Landmark studies have been conducted in Australia that have highlighted the significant impacts on wellbeing and risks to safety associated with this violence, but as yet there is no consensus in regards to the definitions, effects, legal and judicial remedies and social responses. By bringing together 20 leading scholars, practitioners and technology experts from across the nation, this workshop will produce knowledge that will improve policy and practice in protecting and empowering victims, with the ultimate aim of preventing this under-recognised violence from occurring.

The workshop will also be supported by the Crime and Justice Research Centre and will be held in August 2018; for more on the event, outcomes and research conducted by QUT scholars in this field, contact Bridget.Harris@qut.edu.au

Webinar- Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Join CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter DeKeseredy and Professor Martin Schwartz for an international webinar

Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Read more

Molly Dragiewicz speaking at European Conference on Domestic Violence

screen-shot-2017-09-05-at-09-37-48.png

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz from Crime and Justice Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology will speak at the II European Conference on Domestic Violence in Porto, Portugal on 8 September 2017. Read more