QUT’s Graduate Certificate on Domestic Violence featured on ABC Focus

ABC Focus will run an episode on domestic violence education in Australia on 27 March 2018 at 12:00pm QLD time. The episode features JS12 Queensland University of Technology’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence and JSB286 Queensland University of Technology’s interdisciplinary undergraduate elective Domestic Violence.

Listen to the episode here 

Links to resources from the episode can be found here.

Seminar: Critical skills for critical minds: recognizing evidence manipulation in death investigations

CJRC member, Dr Claire Ferguson, recently spoke at an Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers seminar at QPS Headquarters on the topic of “Critical skills for critical minds:  recognizing evidence manipulation in death investigations”.  This event was held at Queensland Police Headquarters.

Claire spoke about key critical thinking skills in the context of death investigation examples, including the important Leahy/Arnold double murder case in North Queensland.

Claire used this and other examples to examine offenders and scenes that successfully fooled investigators and how and why the critical thinking process failed.  Common problems such as bias, observer effects, metacognitive errors and logical mistakes were considered and discussed with a view to demonstrating the critical thinking skills required for successful investigations and intelligence gathering.

This event was the largest turnout AIPIO have ever had, with 80 guests in attendance.

 

 

 

QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence in the news

The Sydney Morning Herald ran a story about graduate education about domestic violence in Australia. A new weapon in the fight against family violence by Jane Gilmore was published 20 March 2018. The article features quotes from QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence alumni. For more information about the units in the Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence click here.

Recently published: 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology

The 2nd edition of the Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, edited by CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter S. DeKeseredy and CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz was published on 17 March 2018. The updated edition includes forty chapters and more than a dozen contributions by CJRC staff and adjunct professors such as:

Left realism: a new look (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz)
Southern criminology (Kerry Carrington, Russell Hogg, and Maximo Sozzo)
Masculinities and Crime (James W. Messerschmidt and Stephen Tomsen)
Queer criminology (Carrie Buist, Emily Lenning, and Matthew Ball)
Critical Green criminology (Rob White)
Green cultural criminology (Avi Brisman and Nigel South)
Towards a Criminology of War, Violence and Militarism (Ross McGarry and Sandra Walklate)
Terrorism. The Problem with Radicalization: Overlooking the elephants in the room (Sandra Walklate and Gaybe Mythen)
Thinking critically about contemporary adult pornography and woman abuse (Walter S. DeKeseredy and Amanda Hall-Sanchez)
Antifeminism and backlash: a critical criminological imperative (Molly Dragiewicz)
A critical examination of girls’ violence and juvenile justice (Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko)
The future of a critical rural criminology (Joseph F. Donnermeyer)
Violence and social policy (Elliott Currie)
Confronting adult pornography (Walter DeKeseredy)

An Author meets critics session will be held at the American Society of Criminology meetings in Atlanta, Georgia in November 2018.

Workshop on backlash and resistance to gender equality

Associate Professor Michael Flood presented on backlash and resistance to community educators and advocates in Melbourne. He was the guest of the Women’s Health Association of Australia’s “Preventing Violence Against Women Community of Practice” on February 20 in Melbourne. His presentation explored the nature of resistance to gender equality and violence prevention initiatives and ways to respond to and minimise such pushback.

This work forms part of an evidence review commissioned by VicHealth (the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation) and co-authored with QUT’s Molly Dragiewicz and UTAS’s Bob Pease. The review will be released by VicHealth on March 20.

ARC Scholarships for Higher Degree Students: Preventing Gendered Violence

ARC Scholarship – Preventing Gendered Violence The scholarship HDR student will work with a team on a project entitled “Preventing Gendered Violence: Lessons from the Global South”, funded by the Australian Research Council. The scholarship can either be for a Masters or PhD. Both domestic and international students can apply.
Eligibility Details You must meet QUT’s eligibility requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy or Master of Philosophy, in line with the course you are applying for. In addition to this, your relevant degree used as the basis for entry must be in the fields of law, criminology or social science. Provision of the scholarship is conditional on successful application and admission into the applicable course.
Ideally, applicants will also have Spanish language skills as the fieldwork will be in Argentina and Australia.

What you receive A living allowance for two years for Masters students or three years for PhD students, indexed annually ($27,082 in 2018). The scholarship is tax exempt for full-time students, and can be used to support living costs. A relocation allowance may be available subject to application and approval by the Chief Investigator of the project. An allowance may also be available for fieldworkrelated travel subject to the needs of the project and approval of the Chief Investigator.
International students will also receive a higher degree research (HDR) tuition fee sponsorship. If you’re an Australian citizen or permanent visa holder, or a New Zealand citizen, your tuition fees are normally covered by the Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) Fees Offset (Domestic
The Scholarship will be governed by the QUT Postgraduate Research Award rules.
How to apply Applications for the scholarship will close on the 30th of April 2018.
Submit your application to the Faculty of Law Research Team at law.research@qut.edu.au.
Your application must include:
 A cover letter  An up-do-date CV  Full academic transcript

 A summary (up to 2 pages) of your career outlining any abilities or experiences relevant to this scholarship  Details of 3 referees (email/address/contact number)
What Happens next Eligibility for admission to a PhD or Masters is determined by the Research Students Centre. Scholarship applications will be assessed by the Faculty of Law.
For more information about the scholarship or application process please contact:
Professor Kerry Carrington kerry.carrington@qut.edu.au
+61731387112
Or
Máximo Sozzo msozzo80@gmail.com

Publication: Victim Stories and Victim Policy – PhD Student Kara Beavis

Congratulations to QUT School of Justice PhD student Kara Beavis whose  article on Victim stories and victim policy has been published in Sage Criminology’s Crime, Media and Culture International Journal.  The focus of the article is Rosie Batty’s influence on public policy and popular discourse in Australia.

Kara co-authored the article with Professor JaneMaree Maher, Professor Jude McCulloch and Dr. Kate Fitz-Gibbon from Monash University’s Gender Equity and Family Violence Focus Research Unit.

Kara is a Ph.D. student researching political economy and the prevention of intimate partner violence following fifteen years’ experience in senior roles in gender equity and violence against women in government and NGO settings in Australia, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

Most recently, Kara worked for Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS) in Sydney and has worked as a Research Affiliate with Monash University’s Gender and Family Violence Focus Research Program.

Kara is also the Unit Coordinator of Dynamics of Domestic Violence and Guest Lecturer in Theories of Government at QUT School of Justice.

Read the full article here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/eprint/6TrTMx2jsPnWJCIbDUsw/full

 

 

 

Coercive Control Workshop and Celebration of Books

Coercive Control Workshop 

The concept of ‘Coercive Control’ as a means of making sense of the nature and extent of violence(s) in women’s everyday lives has been around since the early 1980s. However its recent revitalisation by Evan Stark has resulted in rejuvenated interest in it in the policy domain. In England and Wales an offence of coercive control was introduced in December 2015 and a recent special edition of Criminology and Criminal Justice exposes this concept and associated legal and professional practices to international interrogation. The purpose of this workshop is to examine the efficacy of the implementation of this recent legislation alongside subjecting this concept to further critical interrogation with a view to examining its potential value for other jurisdictions.

Please join the Crime and Justice Research Centre and the School of Justice for a workshop on ‘Coercive Control’, with leading practitioners and academics. Following the event, there will be a Celebration of Books recently published by Crime and Justice Research Centre members.

March 15, 2018

3.00 – 5.00pm
Including light refreshments
OJW Room, Level 12, S Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

This event requires registration.  To register, please email Brigid Xavier – brigid.xavier@qut.edu.au.  Eventbrite link to follow. 

Speakers

Kate Fitz-Gibbon
Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Monash University.

Sandra Walklate
Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool (U.K)

Rachel Neil

Principal Solicitor of the Women’s Legal Service (WLS)

 

Media discourse surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims – The Ashley Madison data breach case

Media discourses surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims

The case of the Ashley Madison data breach

Cassandra Cross, Megan Parker and Daniel Sansom

Abstract

Data breaches are an increasingly common event across businesses globally. Many companies have been subject to large-scale breaches. Consequently, the exposure of 37 million customers of the Ashley Madison website is not an extraordinary event in and of itself. However, Ashley Madison is an online dating website predominantly known for facilitating extramarital affairs. Therefore, the nature of this website (and business) is very different from those that have previously been breached. This article examines one of the media discourses surrounding the victims of the Ashley Madison data breach. It particular, it illustrates examples of victim blaming evident in the print media towards individuals (or customers) who had their personal details exposed. Importantly, it highlights the emerging tension within this particular case, of the strong victim blaming narrative contrasted against those who attempted to challenge this discourse and refocus attention on the actual offenders, and the criminality of the act. The article concludes that victims of this data breach were exposed to victim blaming, based on the perceived immorality of the website they were connected to and their actions in subscribing, rather than focusing on the data breach itself, and the blatant criminality of the offenders who exposed the sensitive information.

Available online at the International Review of Victimology

 

 

Welcome Dr Laura Bedford

On Monday we welcomed Dr Laura Bedford as a new lecturer within the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, at QUT with a morning tea at The Gardens Café at Gardens Point.

Laura holds a PhD in Criminology, a MA in Economic History and a B. Soc Sci (Hons) in Political Science.  Laura has over 25 years experience in social and economic policy research and advocacy, working as a consultant and in senior roles in the public and private sector in South Africa and Australia.  Over the past two years, Laura has been employed by the Queensland Police Service as the lead researcher on a randomised controlled field trial which examined the impact of mobile technology on frontline policing.  Laura is currently interested in new directions in criminology, including the application of social and environment justice perspectives to problematise the translation of hegemonic criminological theory, and criminal justice practice, within the Global South.

We warmly welcome Laura to the team.