INTRODUCING NEW BOOK SERIES: Routledge Studies in Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South Call for Proposals

Crime and justice studies, as with much social science, has concentrated mainly on problems in the metropolitan centres of the Global North, while Asia and the Global South have remained largely invisible in criminological thinking. Routledge is now accepting proposals for a brand new research series which aims to redress this imbalance by showcasing exciting new ways of thinking and doing crime and justice research from the global periphery. Edited by John Scott and Russell Hogg or Queensland University of Technology and by Wing Hong Chui of City University of Hong Kong, the series provides an opportunity to illustrate the work of emerging and established scholars who are challenging traditional paradigms in the fields of crime and justice. Bringing together scholarly work from a range of disciplines, from criminology, law, and sociology to psychology, cultural geography and comparative social sciences, the series will offer grounded empirical research and fresh theoretical approaches and cover a range of pressing topics, including international corruption, drug use, environmental issues, sex work, organized crime, innovative models of justice, and punishment and penology.

Please contact John Scott (j31.scott@qut.edu.au), Russell Hogg (russell.hogg@qut.edu.au), Wing Hong Chui (eric.chui@cityu.edu.hk) for more details, or alternatively Tom Sutton (Thomas.Sutton@tandf.co.uk) , Senior Editor for Criminology at Routledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSA grant success: ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ Workshop 2018

CJRC staff – Dr Bridget Harris and Professor Kerry Carrington, with Dr Delanie Woodlock and the Honourable Marcia Neave – have received funding from the Academy of Social Sciences Australia to host a workshop in August 2018, on ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ #DVTech18 #DVTech18QUT

Domestic violence is widely recognised as one of Australia’s most important social issues, with approximately one woman killed by her partner, weekly. This event will bring focus to an emerging trend in domestic violence: the use of technology to stalk and abuse victim/survivors. Landmark studies have been conducted in Australia that have highlighted the significant impacts on wellbeing and risks to safety associated with this violence, but as yet there is no consensus in regards to the definitions, effects, legal and judicial remedies and social responses. By bringing together 20 leading scholars, practitioners and technology experts from across the nation, this workshop will produce knowledge that will improve policy and practice in protecting and empowering victims, with the ultimate aim of preventing this under-recognised violence from occurring.

The workshop will also be supported by the Crime and Justice Research Centre and will be held in August 2018; for more on the event, outcomes and research conducted by QUT scholars in this field, contact Bridget.Harris@qut.edu.au

Discovery and DECRA success for the Crime and Justice Research Centre

We are delighted to announce the following successful ARC DECRA and DISCOVERY  successes.

Dr Angela Higginson has been awarded a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) entitled,  Ethnically Motivated Youth Hate Crime in Australia

Total Funding Amount: $344,996 over three years
 
Proposal Summary:
This project aims to provide the first assessment of youth hate crime in Australia, examine incidence rates over time, and explore how Australia’s experiences compare internationally. Hate crime can cause injury, psychological harm and social disengagement. For victims in early adolescence – a critical time of identity formation – the harms may be multiplied. The project will uncover the risk and protective factors for perpetration and victimisation, and for understanding the consequences for hate crime victims. This is expected to benefit the community by helping to inform social policy to improve the lives of Australia’s youth.

Out of 197 successful DECRA, only 2 were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Professor Kerry Carrington is the successful recipient of a Discovery grant entitled, Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south

Total Funding Amount: $228,951 over three years

Projects Summary:
Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south. This project aims to study the establishment of police stations for women in Argentina as a key element to preventing gendered violence. This project aims to discover the extent to which the Argentinian interventions prevent the occurrence of gendered violence, and identify aspects that could inform the development of new approaches to preventing gendered violence in Australia. Anticipated outcomes include knowledge critical to developing and implementing new ways to prevent gendered violence, with long-term benefits for national health, wellbeing and productivity.

Out of 594 successful Discovery Projects, only four were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Call for papers – Southern Criminology Workshop, Argentina  7-9 Nov 2018

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Southern Criminology Workshop 7-9 N0VEMBER 2018
SANTA FE, ARGENTINA
Co-Hosted by the Faculty of Social and Juridical Sciences, National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina and the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Academic knowledge about crime, law and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape –particularly, the English speaking world. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to reproduce concepts and arguments developed there to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking.
This three day workshop set in the ideal location of Santa Fe, Argentina brings together scholars from across the globe to contribute to this task of de-colonising knowledge about crime, law and justice. The workshop aims to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges.

The workshop will be convened in three languages; Portuguese, Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, an open access journal.

Abstracts of 250 words are invited in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
Abstracts Due: 31 May 2018
Early submission of abstracts is advised as the workshop will be limited to 100.
Email to: delitoysociedad@unl.edu.ar

 

Crime and Justice Research Centre staff headed to American Society of Criminology conference

Crime and Justice Research Centre staff members are headed to American Society of Criminology conference in Philadelphia, PA 14-18 November 2017. Read more

Invitation – Journal Launch: ‘Limits and Prospects of Criminal Law Reform – Past, Present, Future’

Date: 15 November, 5:30pm Location: UTS Law Building (5B, 3.18)

You are invited to the launch of the special edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy on ‘Limits and Prospects of Criminal Law Reform – Past, Present, Future’ (2017, Vol 6, No 3). A number of the authors from this special edition will reflect on developments and obstacles in criminal law reform.

This special edition arose out of the national Criminal Law Workshop hosted at UTS in 2016, it includes the following articles:

See the full version at: https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/index

Please RSVP to Aline Roux at Aline.Roux@uts.edu.au

Attacks on Encryption – Event Report

Prof. Reece Walter with speakers

Belinda Carpenter opening the event

On Thursday the 5th of October the Crime and Justice Research Centre, in collaboration with civil society groups the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch Australia and FutureWise, and industry partner ThoughtWorks, hosted an event on ‘Attacks on Encryption.’ This in response to the Australian Government’s intention to pursue new and increased powers to access encrypted communications via s’backdoors.’

A panel of encryption experts, international privacy law experts, politicians, digital rights advocates, and journalists examined the social and technical consequences of the proposed new ‘backdooring’ powers. They argued these powers are unnecessary and should be highly concerning for Australians who, unlike other western democracies, do not have a constitutional right to privacy.

Presentations from the night are available at the following links:
Surveillance politics
Former Senator Mr Scott Ludlam
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ

Legal dimensions of the global #waronmaths
Angela Daly, Digital Rights Watch Australia and QUT Law
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=21m35s

Government attacks on encryption and civil society coalition campaigns
Justin Clacherty, Redfish Group, Australian Privacy Foundation, and Future Wise
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=36m15s

Breaking Encryption for Dummies
Robin Doherty, ThoughtWorks and Hack for Privacy and Eru Penkman, ThoughtWorks and brisSafety
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=58m50s
Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1izSTqTmO3Gl79KrliUoeBoFi44NceL4pSIbY8yl-Ur0/edit?usp=sharing

Encryption for journalists
Felix Münch, PhD Candidate QUT Digital Media Research Centre
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h22m
Slides: https://flxvctr.github.io/encrypt_all_the_things_primer/

The contested moral legitimacy of encryption ‘backdoors’
Michael Wilson, QUT Justice PhD Candidate
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h40m44s

Discussant
Phil Green, QLD Privacy Commissioner
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h51m24s

Q&A Panel
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h58m32s

Further information about the event can be found at this link:

https://www.attacks-on-encryption.com/

Webinar- Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Join CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter DeKeseredy and Professor Martin Schwartz for an international webinar

Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Read more