Domestic violence and technology: Findings and future pathways

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft. This free public seminar will present key findings from the report on survivor experiences of technology-facilitated coercive control.

26 June, 2019
4:00 pm-5:30 pm
Room P419, Level 4, P Block, Gardens Point Campus

Download the report and infographics here

Information about the research team, future presentations, and publications is here.

Ask LOIS webinar on Domestic violence and communication technology

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present an Ask LOIS webinar on Domestic violence and communication technology
20 June, 2019
11:00 am-11:30 am
Register here https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/974592111259198209

Read more

Domestic violence and communication technology: Insights from Australian survivors

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz will present Domestic violence and communication technology: Insights from Australian survivors at the Queensland Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Month Breakfast hosted by Cairns Regional Domestic Violence Service in Cairns, Australia. This is the first presentation of the findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft.

Read more

Conflict, Power and Justice in the Global South -International congress on southern criminology Bogotá, Colombia, 6-8 November 2019

Conflict, Power and Justice in the Global South:  2nd International congress on southern criminology

Bogotá, Colombia, 6-8 November 2019

Academic knowledge about conflict, power and justice has traditionally come from a select number of countries belonging to the Global North; whose magazines, conferences, editors and universities exercise dominion over the global intellectual landscape. In recent decades, substantial efforts have been made to mitigate these colonized ways of generating new knowledge in the area.
This three-day congress held in Colombia, invites academics, activists and professionals; who throughout the globe have sought to contribute to the task of democratizing and building a knowledge of the South.

The objective is to connect activists, academics and professionals from north and south; within a collective global project aimed at the creation of innovative and critical global knowledge. The idea emerged from the International congress on southern criminology, which took place in November 2018 at the National University of the Litoral (Argentina), conducted jointly between it and the Technological University of Queensland Australia; the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); the Catholic University of Colombia; the University of Essex (United Kingdom); the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Argentina); the University of Northumbria (United Kingdom) and the University of Oslo (Norway).

The event will have simultaneous translations of selected sessions. Selected articles will be published in a special edition of the journal Critical Criminology.
Summary of 250 words to be sent in English, until: July 31, 2019 to the email:

justice@qut.edu.au

For more information click the conference website

The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission Report on the Family Law System: Implications for Domestic Violence

The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) Review of the Family Law System is the first comprehensive review of Australia’s family law system since its commencement more than 40 years ago.The ALRC Report on the Review of the Family Law System findings and recommendations have serious implications for domestic violence, and women and children will be deeply affected by how they are implemented. Please join us for an interactive discussion and networking luncheon to consider the report and recommendations for domestic violence cases as part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

This is a partnership event between Brisbane Domestic Violence Service and QUT Law. Read more

Report of Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement (PJCLE) Inquiry into the Impact of New and Emerging Information and Communication Technology

Dr Monique Mann

Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with colleagues from Deakin University (Dr Ian Warren and Dr Adam Molnar) and the Chinese University of Hong Kong (Dr Angela Daly) have been extensively cited in the final report of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement (PJCLE) Inquiry into the Impact of New and Emerging Information and Communication Technology.

Their joint programme of research in surveillance and cybercrime (including transnational online policing, darkweb policing, Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties, big data policing, encryption policy, biometrics, and 3D printed firearms) was cited twenty-nine times in the report.

Their research is highly critical of the human rights implications of new technologies in policing, and it clearly shaped the report, directly influencing the recommendations handed down by the PCJLE, which can be found here: https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/publications/tabledpapers/02593c55-f6db-4432-85c7-e0ba89b0e21b/upload_pdf/PJCLE_Impact%20of%20emerging%20info%20and%20comms%20tech_April%202019.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22publications/tabledpapers

Drs Mann and Molnar appeared before the committee to give oral evidence in March 2018, and their opening statement to the Parliamentary Joint Committee can be found here: https://privacy.org.au/2018/03/30/statement-to-the-parliamentary-joint-committee-on-law-enforcement/

Their original full submission provided to the Inquiry, representing all digital rights civil society organisations in Australia, can be found here: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/116090/

Monika Zalnieriute – Emerging Australian Scholar – Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference

We welcome Dr Monika Zalnieriute as an invited Emerging Australian Scholar in the Technology and Justice stream at our upcoming Crime, Justice and Social Democracy International Conference to be held on the Gold Coast from 15-17 July 2019.

Monika is a Research Fellow at the Allens Hub for Technology, Law and Innovation at the UNSW Faculty of Law in Sydney, Australia. Her research most often explores the interplay between law, politics and technology; and focuses on social justice in the digital age. Monika is also interested in advancing feminist movement and theory, and believes that research only matters if it has a strong impact well beyond academia. Her work has been published in Modern Law Review (2018, 2019), Research Handbook on Human Rights and Digital Technology (2019) and Queering International Law (2017). Monika has consulted the World Health Organization, Council of Europe, and international NGOs, such as Privacy International and Article 19.

For more information about the conference including speakers, registration and abstract submission, see here.

 

Speakers: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference

We have a great line-up of Keynote, International Visitors and Emerging Australian Scholars at our Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference from 15-17 July 2019 at the Gold Coast, Australia.

This conference creates a globally connected space to enhance rich and significant
dialogue between scholars and practitioners from both the Global North and
the Global South. Please join us for what is shaping up to be a diverse and engaging
event.

Keynote:

Meda Chesney-Lind, President, American Society of Criminology, University of Hawaii

Emerging Australian Scholars:

Max Travers, UTAS, Southern Criminology stream
Jarrett Blaustein, Monash, Southern Criminology stream
Lennon Chang, Monash, Southern Criminology stream
Kate Gleeson, Macquarie Law School, Gender, Sexuality and Violence stream
Nicola Henry, RMIT, Gender, Sexuality and Violence stream
Max Halupka, University of Canberra, Governance, Activism and Social Change stream
Zahra Stardust, Scarlet Alliance, Governance, Activism and Social Change stream
Emma Russell, Latrobe, Policing stream
Monika Zalnieriute, UNSW, Technology and Justice stream

International Visitors:

Diego Zysman, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina
Richard Sparks, University of Edinburgh
Ross Coomber, University of Liverpool
John Pratt, Victoria University of Wellington
Miyazawa Setsuo, President, Asian Criminological Society, Senior Visiting Professor of
Law at UC Hastings College of the Law and Professor Emeritus at Kobe University.
Tom Holt, Michigan State University

To find out more, to register or to submit an abstract see here.

 

CJSDRC 5th Biennial International Conference – Abstract submission date EXTENDED

The Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference,
hosted by QUT Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre,
Is coming up from 15-17 July 2019 at Crowne Plaza Hotel, Gold Coast, Australia.

Registrations are filling fast and the abstract submission date has been extended
from 31 March 2019 to 30 April 2019.

A program outline and a snapshot of the great line-up of speakers, which include
International Guests and Emerging Australia Scholars can be found here.

This conference creates a globally connected space to enhance rich and significant
dialogue between scholars and practitioners from both the Global North and
the Global South. Please join us for what is shaping up to be a diverse and engaging
event.

To register for the conference, or to submit your abstract please click here.

Book: The Struggle over Human Rights: The Non-Aligned Movement, Jimmy Carter and Neoliberalism

Sessional academic Courtney Hercus has recently had a book published based on her PhD research.  The Struggle over Human Rights: The Non-Aligned Movement, Jimmy Carter, and Neoliberalism traces the origins of the relationship between neoliberalism and the modern doctrine of human rights to the 1970s. It uses empirical evidence to prove that the Carter administration transformed the U.S., and the traditional Western liberal approach to human rights, in response, in part, to the actions of the Non-Aligned Movement. The New International Economic Order (NIEO), a high-point in Non-Aligned solidarity, placed pressures on the power relations of the international system and sought to advance the social and economic rights of the Third World. Carter’s transformation promoted civil and political rights as the only acceptable “human” rights and relegated economic rights to a “basic needs” approach, undercutting welfare state principles in the U.S. and in the newly emergent independent states in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. This doctrine, as the book highlights through extensive archival research, sharpened the definition of international human rights to serve the maintenance of the U.S.-led world order. Carter’s diplomatic use of human rights obfuscated exploitative economic structures and paved the way for an aggressive neoliberal transformation through World Bank and IMF Structural Adjustment Programs under Reagan. Historical studies of human rights have ignored these connections, making this book a unique contribution to the scholarship of human rights.

Further information about the book can be found here:  https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781498574020/The-Struggle-over-Human-Rights-The-Non-Aligned-Movement-Jimmy-Carter-and-Neoliberalism