Welcome – QUT School of Justice – Dr Caitlin Mollica

We welcome Dr. Caitlin Mollica as a Lecturer within QUT School of Justice, Faculty of Law.  Caitlin completed her PhD at Department of Government and International Relations at Griffith University (2018). Caitlin’s research interests include youth, gender, transitional justice and human rights. Caitlin’s primary research considers the engagement of young people with transitional justice and human rights practices.  Her work also examines the unique ways girls and young women access justice in the Asia Pacific.

Caitlin’s published work examines the contributions of Solomon Islander youth to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission process and highlights the importance of recognising the agency and individual voices of youth as a way to ensure more inclusive and holistic reconciliation practices. Caitlin has been co-investigator on a UN Women-funded research project, that mapped women’s access to formal and informal justice processes in Asia and the Pacific (2019). In 2019, she was awarded a New Researcher Grant from Griffith University to conduct a pilot study for a project on the implementation of UN Resolution 2250 on Youth Peace and Security (2019)Caitlin also secured funding, in collaboration with Dr. Helen Berents (QUT Centre for Justice), from the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia (ASSA) for a workshop on Youth and Peace in the Indo-Pacific (2019).  This workshop brought together scholars and practitioners to consider how policy responses and scholarship can better engage with the peace and security challenges facing young people in the region.

Currently, Caitlin is developing a project that examines the relationship between donors and youth in the broader context of the new international mandate on youth inclusive peace building.

A warm welcome to Caitlin from all of us at QUT Centre for Justice.

 

Welcome – QUT School of Justice – Dr Danielle Watson

We welcome Dr Danielle Watson as a Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, Faculty of Law.   

Danielle was awarded a PhD in Sociolinguistics from the University of the West Indies, St Augustine in 2016.  She was the former coordinator of the Pacific Policing Programme at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. Danielle specializes in police/civilian relations on the margins with particular interests in hotspot policing, police recruitment and training as well as many other areas specific to policing in developing country contexts. Her research interests are multidisciplinary in scope as she also conducts research geared towards the advancement of tertiary teaching and learning.

Danielle is the principal researcher on two ongoing projects “Policing Pacific Island Communities” and “Re-Imagining Graduate Supervision at Regional Universities”. She is also the lead author (with Erik Blair) of Reimagining Graduate Supervision in Developing Contexts: A Focus on Regional Universities (2018, Taylor and Francis), and sole author of Police and the Policed: Language and Power Relations on the Margins of the Global South (2018, Palgrave Macmillan).

Danielle has received several awards and grants to conduct research in Trinidad and Tobago, Germany, Austria, Canada, Australia and Fiji. Among the prestigious awards she received were a Caribbean-Pacific Island Mobility Scheme (CARPIMS) PhD Mobility Scholarship (2014), an Australian Government Endeavour Executive Fellowship (2016) and a British Academy Fellowship (2018).

Danielle is passionate about working with all stakeholders involved in the maintenance of law and order, and hopes to advance policing policies and practices through academic outreach.

Welcome Danielle!

On Friday we will profile our third and final new member to the school.

Vice-Chancellors’s Award for Excellence – Dr Cassandra Cross

Congratulations to Dr Cassandra Cross, member of QUT Centre for Justice, on her recent Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence.  This award is conferred to individuals or teams in recognition of exceptional performance that aligns with the university’s vision and strategic goals.

Cass’ award was based on excellence in Partnerships and Engagement for forging transdisciplinary research partnerships and enhancing engagement within and beyond the QUT community.

Cass has built strong partnerships and engagement in the areas of fraud and cybercrime with SUNCORP, several Australian Police agencies, PCYC Queensland, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and Self-Managed Independent Superannuation Funds Association (SISFA)

Congratulations Cass.

 

 

The Final Report of ARC Field Research on Women’s Police Stations, Buenos Aires, Argentina is now published in English and Spanish

The Final Report of ARC Field Research on Women’s Police Stations, Buenos Aires, Argentina is now published in English and Spanish, and free to download from the project page

Summary of the Report
Women’s Police Stations are unique innovations that emerged from nations of the Global South in the second half of the 20th century to address violence against women. This report presents the results of a world first study of the unique way these stations called Comisaría de la Mujer (CMF) prevent gender-based violence in the Province of Buenos Aires Argentina. In Spanish and Portuguese these stations are called Police Stations for Women, for the sake of ease in this article we call them Women’s Police Stations. Little is currently known about how this distinctive multi-disciplinary model of policing (that includes social workers, lawyers, psychologists and police) prevents gender violence.
First, we outline the background to the emergence of Women’s Police Stations in the societies of the Global South designed explicitly to respond to and prevent gender-based violence. These stations are distinguished from the women only police units that existed in most parts of the Global North that restricted women in law enforcement to caring for women and children in custody (Cartron 2015, 9). The main substance of the report presents the results of our empirical study on the role of Women’s Police Stations in responding to and preventing gender violence in the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The province established its first women’s police station in 1988 and now has 128. They account for one in five of all police stations in the province and since 2009 have had a legislated mandate to prevent gender violence which distinguishes them from other Women’s Police Stations. We interviewed 100 employees from ten of these unique multi-disciplinary stations.
The final section critically reflects on the virtues and limits of Women’s Police Stations as a model for addressing and preventing gender-based violence. The report compares traditional policing versus specialist policing approaches to the prevention of gender-based violence. While not without limitations, we conclude that specialised Women’s Police Stations in the societies of the Global South widen access to justice, empower women to break the cycle of domestic violence, and engage in a form of community policing that challenges the social norms that sustain gender violence. As a by-product they also provide a career in law enforcement for police (male and female) who specialise in responding to gender violence. The study is framed by Southern Criminology which reverses the notion that ideas, policies and theories can only travel from the Global North to the Global South. The study is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and includes a multi-country team of researchers whose contributions we gratefully acknowledge.

Citation

English

Carrington, K. Sozzo, M. Puyol, M. V. Gamboa, M. Guala, N. Ghiberto, L. Zysman, D. (2019) The Role of Women’s Police Stations in Responding to and Preventing Gender Violence: Buenos Aires, Argentina: Final Report of Field Research. QUT Centre for Justice: Brisbane. Research Report Series 1.

Spanish
Carrington, Kerry , Sozzo, Maximo , Puyol, Maria Victoria , Gamboa, Marcela , Guala, Natacha , Ghiberto, Luciana , & Zysman, Diego (2019) El rol de las Comisarías de la Mujer en la prevención y el abordaje de la violencia de género, Buenos Aires, Argentina: Informe final de trabajo de campo. QUT Centre for Justice: Brisbane. Research Report Series 1.

For more information about the ARC project click here

Bridget Harris: ANZSOC New Scholar Prize 2019

Congratulations to QUT C4J member, Dr Bridget Harris, on her recent award of ANZSOC New Scholar Prize for 2019.  The New Scholar Prize is given each year for the best publication in criminology (or a related area) written by a member of the Society who qualifies as an early career researcher.

The article, co-authored with Delanie Woodlock , was published in British Journal of Criminology and  is titled, “Digital Coercive Control: Insights From Two Landmark Domestic Violence Studies”.  The authors present their recent studies on harmful and invasive behaviours enacted through technology.  Bridget applies her research focus of domestic and family violence (DFV) and spatiality, and the unique ‘spaceless’ features of technology-facilitated DFV.

The full article is available through open access and can be found here.

Congratulations to Bridget on a very successful year pioneering and further developing research into this very important area, both in Australia and internationally.  A well deserved award.

 

 

2nd International Congress on Southern Criminology: Conflict, Power and Justice, Bogotá, Colombia

QUT Centre for Justice co-hosted the 2nd International Congress on Southern Criminology: Conflict, Power and Justice, Bogotá, Colombia, November 6-9 2019.

The event was attended by around 150 delegates from around the world. The majority of participants came from across Latin America, but also participants from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, University of Essex, University of Northumbria and University of Leicester, UK;  the University of Oslo, Norway and of course QUT Centre for Justice.

Papers were grouped into the following themes: Indigenous Knowledges and Southern Criminology; Gender Violence and Southern Criminology; Punishment and Southern Criminology and Eco-Crimes and Southern Criminology.

Academic knowledge about conflict, power and justice has traditionally come from a select number of countries belonging to the Global North; whose magazines, conferences, editors and universities exercise dominion over the global intellectual landscape. In recent decades, substantial efforts have been made to mitigate these colonized ways of generating new knowledge in the area. This three-day congress held in Colombia sought to contribute to the task of democratizing and building a knowledge of the South.

The first International congress on southern criminology, took place in November 2018 at the National University of the Litoral (Argentina). This second congress was co-hosted jointly between it and the Queensland University of Technology, Australia; the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); the Catholic University of Colombia; the University of Essex (United Kingdom); the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Argentina); the University of Northumbria (United Kingdom) and the University of Oslo (Norway).

The event had simultaneous translations. Selected articles will be published in a special edition of the journal Critical Criminology. 

QUT Workshop: Gender Violence and the Global South

The QUT Centre for Justice co-hosted a two day workshop on Gender Violence and the Global South on 2-3 November in the beautiful surroundings of the Botanic Gardens Café.

The workshop heard from leading scholars on gender violence from Brasil, Victoria, NSW, Qld, Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and PNG. Outcomes include plans to edit a special edition of the Journal, a Handbook on Feminism and Gender Violence in the Global South, a co-hosted conference in Port Alegre, Brasil, November 2020; an international network, and international reading group. Key note speakers included Carmen Hein de Campos, Soraia Mendes, Camila Magalhaes, and Thiago Peirobom from Brasil, Heather Nancarrow, CEO of ANROWS; Professor Heather Douglas, Law UQ; and Rowena Maguire, QUT Law

 

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Crime and Justice Briefing Paper Series

We welcome Dr Laura Vitis as the new co-editor of the Crime and Justice Briefing Paper Series, replacing Dr Monique Mann who is leaving QUT.   Laura joins our current co-editor, Associate Professor Michael Flood.

The Crime and Justice Briefing Paper Series provide short, accessible accounts of topics and issues related to crime and justice.  This open access publication features research undertaken by staff, students and affiliated researchers for the QUT School of Justice (formerly Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre), and are blind peer reviewed.

Our first Briefing Paper was released in July and is titled, “The Case for Decriminalisation:  Sex Work and the Law in Queensland”.  A copy of the Briefing Paper can be found here.  

We welcome Laura to this new role.

 

Event: Making a killing: corporate rationality, global inequality and collateral murder

We were fortunate to welcome Professor Anthony Collins from La Trobe University to present an internal seminar on “Making a killing: corporate rationality, global inequality and collateral murder”.  

Anthony’s presentation rethinks the mass murder of 346 people in two related incidents in the past year. It is part of a larger project exploring how we understand violence and the consequences of these conceptualisations. Despite the emergence of a compelling body of evidence showing exactly how these killings occurred, we can safely assume that none of those responsible for these horrific deaths will be prosecuted. One reason for this is that the deaths do not fit with how we commonly imagine homicide, criminality, or even human agency. Another is the networks of global power and inequality that divide the perpetrators and the victims. A third is the social cultures that shaped the thoughts and actions of those responsible, and how deeply these homicidal organisational practices are normalised in the political and economic values of the Western world. This case study thus leads us to reconceptualise the very idea of violence, and to argue that a social justice approach requires that we articulate a theory of violence that moves away from both common-sense and legalistic understandings, and towards a more critical understanding of harm. This in turn troubles the easy distinction between perpetrators and ordinary folks who are just busy living their lives, in a way that increasingly implicates us all in systems of violence.

As an African of colonial extraction, Anthony’s research and community engagement is primarily located in Southern Africa, where they work with organisations involved with violence prevention, and support for survivors of intimate and gendered violence. This interest has also included developing new courses on Violence, and Working with Survivors of Violence, in addition to teaching in more traditional areas such Victimology, Gender Studies and Qualitative Research Methods. Anthony is currently the co-ordinator of the Crime, Justice and Legal Studies Honours programme at La Trobe University, and honorary professor at Rhodes University and Durban University of Technology in South Africa.

First Article: Law, Technology and Humans

Law, Technology and Humans is an international, open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing original, innovative research concerned with the human and humanity of law and technology. Supported by the Faculty of Law, the Journal was launched earlier this year alongside the QUT Law Lab and is one of four QUT-supported scholarly journals.

Ahead of the inaugural issue scheduled for later this year, Law, Technology and Humans has published its first article. Towards the Uberisation of Legal Practice considers ‘NewLaw’, a new business model in the delivery of legal services. Emerita Professor of Law at the ANU College of Law Margaret Thornton discusses the key features of NewLaw entities and the ramifications for individual lawyers, with some interesting perspectives in regards to gender and age. Online first at  https://lthj.qut.edu.au/article/view/1277

Follow Journal announcements on Twitter @LawTechHum