Media discourse surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims – The Ashley Madison data breach case

Media discourses surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims

The case of the Ashley Madison data breach

Cassandra Cross, Megan Parker and Daniel Sansom

Abstract

Data breaches are an increasingly common event across businesses globally. Many companies have been subject to large-scale breaches. Consequently, the exposure of 37 million customers of the Ashley Madison website is not an extraordinary event in and of itself. However, Ashley Madison is an online dating website predominantly known for facilitating extramarital affairs. Therefore, the nature of this website (and business) is very different from those that have previously been breached. This article examines one of the media discourses surrounding the victims of the Ashley Madison data breach. It particular, it illustrates examples of victim blaming evident in the print media towards individuals (or customers) who had their personal details exposed. Importantly, it highlights the emerging tension within this particular case, of the strong victim blaming narrative contrasted against those who attempted to challenge this discourse and refocus attention on the actual offenders, and the criminality of the act. The article concludes that victims of this data breach were exposed to victim blaming, based on the perceived immorality of the website they were connected to and their actions in subscribing, rather than focusing on the data breach itself, and the blatant criminality of the offenders who exposed the sensitive information.

Available online at the International Review of Victimology

 

 

Welcome Dr Laura Bedford

On Monday we welcomed Dr Laura Bedford as a new lecturer within the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, at QUT with a morning tea at The Gardens Café at Gardens Point.

Laura holds a PhD in Criminology, a MA in Economic History and a B. Soc Sci (Hons) in Political Science.  Laura has over 25 years experience in social and economic policy research and advocacy, working as a consultant and in senior roles in the public and private sector in South Africa and Australia.  Over the past two years, Laura has been employed by the Queensland Police Service as the lead researcher on a randomised controlled field trial which examined the impact of mobile technology on frontline policing.  Laura is currently interested in new directions in criminology, including the application of social and environment justice perspectives to problematise the translation of hegemonic criminological theory, and criminal justice practice, within the Global South.

We warmly welcome Laura to the team.

 

‘Examining Stakeholder Perceptions of Community Policing in the Pacific: A Pilot Study on Community Policing in Tuvalu’ presented by Dr. Danielle Watson

Research Seminar
 
Topic: ‘Examining Stakeholder Perceptions of Community Policing in the Pacific: A Pilot Study on Community Policing in Tuvalu’ presented by Dr. Danielle Watson

Please join members of the Crime and Justice Research Centre for the first in the seminar series for 2018.

Date:         Tuesday 23 January 2018
When:       4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue:      C Block, Level 4, Room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register:  by Thursday 18 January 2018
by accepting the calendar invitation or emailing law.research@qut.edu.au

Abstract:
Recent dialogue about police capacity building in the Pacific region highlights the necessity of adapting and formulating context specific initiatives geared towards advancing jurisdictional agendas. What these discussions vaguely acknowledge is the uniqueness of member countries within the region with specific capacity building requirements and the need for development initiatives to match contextual challenges. Development initiatives should reflect consideration of police organizations role as the most visible arm of the state with responsibility for maintaining law and order, from a standpoint of promoting efficiency and effectiveness. Critical to Pacific police organizations capacity to execute the state mandate is the ability of officers to demonstrate the highest levels of accuracy and efficiency in conducting professional practice. My argument is that continued review of what is considered professional practice and examination of customer satisfaction with the service provided by police are of paramount importance to meeting the police mandate of maintaining law and order at the societal level.
The Tuvalu Police Service (TPS) has expressed its commitment to providing more service oriented policing underscored by professional codes of conduct, behaviors and performance. What presents a difficulty for the police organization, however, is the lack of capacity to drive, evaluate and strategically revise changes, and the inability to derive informed responses to societal stakeholder expectations. The organization therefore relies on donor aid countries to provide required assistance. Most recently, the University of the South Pacific was approached to assist with the collection and analysis of data to inform the TPS’s strategic planning and crime prevention model. The study is a subset of that initiative intended to provide assistance to the TPS by firstly, creating a model for assessing primary stakeholders (police and public) perceptions of and satisfaction with the provision of community policing services; secondly, conduct a comparative analysis of stakeholder perceptions and finally, offer recommendations for continued professional development of police officers in the area of community policing and propose an actionable direction for improved community policing based on the identified stakeholders’ positions. Danielle’s goal is to add to the ongoing dialogue about community policing initiatives in the Pacific and provide necessary data for continued reflection and revision of policing practices in developing Pacific islands.

Danielle is the coordinator of the Pacific Policing Programme at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. She conducts research on police/civilian relations on the margins with particular interests in hotspot policing, police recruitment and training as well as many other areas specific to policing in developing country contexts. Her research interests are multidisciplinary in scope as she also conducts research geared towards the advancement of tertiary teaching and learning. She is the principal researcher on two ongoing projects “Policing Pacific Island Communities” and “Re-Imagining Graduate Supervision at Regional Universities”. She is also the lead author (with Erik Blair) of Reimagining Graduate Supervision in Developing Contexts: A Focus on Regional Universities (2018, Taylor and Francis), and sole author of a forthcoming Pivot Police and the Policed: Language and Power Relations on the Margins of the Global South (2018, Palgrave Macmillan)

 

 

10th ACS conference

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

New Book Series: Perspectives on Law, Crime and Justice from the Global South

Academic perspectives on crime, law and justice have generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to uncritically reproduce concepts and arguments developed elsewhere to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking leading to a burgeoning body of new work. This new book series aims to publish and promote this innovative new scholarship, with a long term view of bridging global divides and enhancing cognitive justice. The editors are especially keen to solicit manuscripts from authors from South America, Oceania, and South Africa.

Series Editors: Kerry Carrington Máximo Sozzo

submit manuscript proposals to kerry.carrington@qut.edu.au

10th ACS conference – Call for abstract

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

 

Does #ANZSOC endorse the Pacific Solution by accepting Sponsorship from www.border.gov.au?

President, Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology

Dear Dr McGee

We are aware that ANZSOC has recently received social media criticism for accepting a ‘silver sponsorship’ from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) for the 2017 conference. We are writing to express concern but also seek clarification about the nature of this sponsorship.

There is an emerging sentiment that this sponsorship was inappropriate for the Society’s annual event. We recognise that the DIBP has a wider ministerial function beyond border protection, however  the remit between DIBP and Australian Borderforce (ABF) is inextricably interwoven. Given the national and international condemnation and controversies surrounding DIBP’s  actions and policies in recent times we are surprised that ANZSOC would take the arguably injudicious decision to accept this department’s sponsorship.

While we acknowledge that DIPB , as mentioned, is responsible for customs and citizenship portfolios, much of its resources are devoted to border protection and the work of ABF. Indeed, the DIPB is jointly headed by Secretary Pezzullo and ABF’s Commissioner Quaedvlieg.

As you’ll be aware, the ABF as an operational arm of the DIPB, has outsourced state functions to corporate entities. Such privatisation of Australian border security, as part of the Pacific Solution, has been mired in allegations of scandal, torture, tax evasion, corruption and human rights abuses resulting in widespread public protest and condemnation. For ANZSOC to grant ‘silver sponsorship’ to a much maligned state-corporate complex with its reportedly unjust, abusive and illegal response to vulnerable people seeking asylum, is an indictment on the Society and an insult to those members who have committed their careers  to championing the plight of victims and to critiquing state and corporate deviance.

We note ANZSOC’s tweeted response to the Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Studies Association’, notably that ‘Criminology has always involved debate re contentious issues. The conference is an important forum to bring different players together 2 have these challenges conversation’. We agree, however, it is one thing to provide a forum for robust debate and offer a platform for all parties to exchange dialogue, it is quite another issue to receive sponsorship from one side of the debate only. Moreover, it is not clear how this year’s conference managed to successfully engage opposed voices in a forum that debated the challenging issues you allude to.

Without clarification of the sponsorship arrangements, and without ANZSOC attempting to disentangle the broader roles of DIPB from ABF, one is left with the impression that the conference was endorsing the Pacific Solution, Manus Island policies and the associated scandals mentioned above. Rightly or wrongly, this is the emerging picture, and the growing criticism on social media attests to that fact.

Would you kindly clarify the nature of the sponsorship. Why did ANZSOC choose to seek sponsorship from a Commonwealth department condemned by the international human rights community and mired in allegations of torture and abuse? We suggest that it is imperative that you as President publicly clarify ANZSOC’s position, and dispel the emerging suspicion that the Society, by virtue of accepting sponsorship, is supporting the punitive and widely-condemned offshore detention policies of the Australian Government.

Professors Reece Walters and John Scott
Directors. Crime and Justice Research Centre
Faculty of Law
Queensland University of Technology
2 George Street, Brisbane
Queensland, 4001.

Dr Cassandra Cross wins two awards at #ANZSOC 2017

Dr Cassandra Cross, Senior Lecturer, School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT was won two awards at the 2017 ANZSOC Conference.

The first is for the best publication by a new scholar in 2016 – ‘They’re Very Lonely’: Understanding the Fraud Victimisation of Seniors’ International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, Vol 6 (4).

The second is the Adam Sutton Crime Prevention Award for the best publication or report on Crime Prevention.

Congratulations Cassandra from your colleagues at CJRC.

VC Excellence Awards for Law and Justice Staff

Today the VC Awards for Excellence were presented by the Dean, Professor John Humphrey for staff in the Faculty Award. The winners, photographed above, included an award for Alison McIntosh, in recognition of her outstanding management as Journal Editor of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.

Dr Matthew Ball, Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, was presented with two awards, one for Excellence in Research and the other for Excellence in Teaching.

Professor John Scott, Dr Bridget Harris and Robyn Johnston were presented with a VC Excellence Award for their organistion of the International Conference, on Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South, which was a tremendous success.

 

 

Vol 6 (4) International Journal for Crime, Justice & Social Democracy just published

Vol 6(4), the special edition of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy on ‘Corruption Downunder’ edited by Scott Poynting and David Whyte, has been published online (as of today, 1 December 2017). The article are free to download and to share.  Please send/tweet/share to your lists.

You will see on the journal’s home page, ahead of the Table of Contents for the issue, that this journal was recently ranked in Q2 by Scopus and has been scored as the top Law journal in Australia. We hope this distinction for the journal will contribute towards interest in your articles and the issue as a whole.