Update: ARC Funded Study of Argentina’s Women’s Police Stations

 

Professor Kerry Carrington with Liliana Pienda Superintendent of Women’s Police, Ministry of Security, Province Buenos Aries.

(Photo: Diego Zysman)

Professor Kerry Carrington has just returned from Argentina where she is researching women’s police stations (Comisarias de Mujer) with Partner Investigator – Professor Máximo Sozzo Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina. The field research has involved interviewing officers who work at these special women’s police stations (WPS). The research team includes – Natacha Guala Research Assistant, Maria Victoria Puyol HDR student, Professor Diego Zysman a Senior Research Associate from the Faculty of Law, Universidad de Buenos Aries. The research has been funded by an ARC Discovery Grant and will report is outcomes in both Spanish and English.

Women’s only police stations emerged historically at a time of re-democratisation in Latin America. They were designed to enhance women’s confidence in the criminal justice system, encourage reporting, prevent re-victimization, and send a message to the community that gendered violence was no longer tolerated and men who abuse women will be made accountable. Brazil was the first country in Latin America to establish women’s only police stations in 1985. Since then, women’s police stations have been established in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, and Uruguay, and more recently in Sierra Leone, India, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Liberia, the Philippines, South Africa and Uganda. A 2011 United Nations Women evaluation found that women only police stations in Latin America enhanced women’s access to justice and their willingness to report, increased the likelihood of conviction, and enlarged access to a range of other services such as counselling, health, legal, financial and social support. Of those surveyed for the evaluation, 77% in Brazil, 77% in Nicaragua, 64% in Ecuador and 57% in Peru felt that women only police stations had reduced violence against women in their countries (Jubb et al 2010).

A recent study of WPS in Brazil used female homicides as a proxy measure for assessing their effectiveness. They compared 2074 municipalities from 2004 to 2009 and found that ‘women’s police stations appear to be highly effective among young women living in metropolitan areas’ . The homicide rate dropped by 17 per cent for all women, but for women aged 15-24 in metropolitan areas the reduction was 50 per cent (or 5.57 deaths reduction per 100,000) (Perova and Reynolds 2017: 193-194).

The province of Buenos Aries currently has 138 women’s police stations employing around 2300 officers. The first one was established at La Plata in 1988. They are designed to address, respond and prevent gendered violence. WPS are hybrid agencies, partly funded by provincial, local barrio, government and community organisations. In Buenos Aires, WPS are commonly located in brightly painted houses that provide a holistic range of services including child care, transport, counselling, legal, social support and comfort. They do not remotely resemble police stations as commonly conceived. Social workers, lawyers and health professionals work in an integrated response team with officers from the WPS to assist victims of gendered violence. The stations have a mandate to prevent gendered violence through grass roots community level primary interventions, local activism, forging partnerships, running local campaigns, and producing informative material for public dissemination. Their effectiveness in preventing gendered violence and the identification of what elements might transfer to other countries has never been studied.

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz wins domestic violence prevention award

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz won a 2018 Domestic Violence Prevention Leadership Award from the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast for Furthering the Work – adding new information and knowledge. Read more

Professor Reece Walters – ESC Conference, Sarajevo

Professor Reece Walters (Director, Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) is pictured above with Professor Gorazd Mesko (President of the European Society of Criminology) at this week’s ESC conference in Sarajevo. Reece has been an International Partner Investigator with Professor Mesko on a Euro$770,000 project examining Water Crimes in Europe funded by the European Commission. This research will be published in a forthcoming book entitled Water, Governance and Crime. Reece has also presented a paper at the ESC as part of special panel on Southern Criminology chaired by QUT Adjunct Professor Maximo Sozzo. Reece’s paper was based on a chapter co-authored with QUT Adjunct Professors Nigel South and Avi Brisman and published in the Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and Global South edited by Kerry Carrington et al. Reece’s presentation focussed on the following:

The politics and conquests of the Global North have long necessitated the forced migration, colonization and ecological plunder of the Global South for imperial and capital expansionism. In recent decades, these excesses of accelerated industrialization have created new victims, with entire populations or “climate refugees” (Barnes and Dove 2015) or “environmental refugees” (Seelye 2001) dislocated by human-induced climate change. This presentation adopts Connell’s (2007) southern theory and Carrington and colleagues’ (2015) idea of a “southern criminology” to examine critically the notion of ‘climate apartheid’ and explore its impacts on the increasing number of individuals displaced by environmental harms.

Welcome Melissa Bull, Professor, School of Justice

Following a recent recruitment process, it is with great pleasure that we announce the appointment of Melissa Bull as Professor in the School of Justice.

Melissa Bull is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University. Her two main areas of research include drug regulation and policing diversity. Her work involves theoretically informed analysis of policy and its translation in to practice in different contexts. Recently this has extended to comparative criminological investigation that considers how various criminal justice responses to offending behaviour translate across differently organised states. Melissa’s current research projects include work that focuses on harm reduction and drug law reform in China and Australia, as well as a project with colleagues from the University of Queensland that explores new ways of thinking about policing in Pacific Island states.

Melissa has published widely on drug regulation and drug control, sentencing and punishment, long term immigration detention, community policing and diversity, counter terrorism narratives and prevention programs, and gender violence in Pacific island states. While at Griffith University she has held a number of research leadership roles, including Deputy Director and then Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security (2012-15). Since 2016 she has been the leader of the Justice, Law and Society research program in the Griffith Criminology Institute. Melissa will join us in November this year in her new role.

We warmly welcome Melissa and congratulate her on her appointment.

Formation of a national Engaging Men Alliance

 Organisations and networks around Australia are involved in work to engage men in building gender equality, across such fields as violence prevention, men’s health, and parenting. CJSDRC Member Associate Professor Michael Flood from the School of Justice was part of a recent meeting in Melbourne intended to bring this work together under a national Engaging Men Alliance. This new body will contribute to policy advocacy, the development of best practice in ‘men’s work’, and community awareness-raising. Dr Flood was invited because of his longstanding research and advocacy work on men, gender, and violence. Organisations and networks represented at the meeting included White Ribbon Australia, Domestic Violence Victoria, Male Champions of Change, No To Violence, Survivors And Mates Support Network (SAMSN), Communicare, and the Department of Social Services. Participants in the meeting affirmed that the Engaging Men Alliance will be attentive to gender inequalities, to intersecting forms of social injustice, and to both privilege and disadvantage in men’s lives.

 

ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship Mentoring Scheme

Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Members Drs Erin O’Brien, Helen Berents and Monique Mann have been selected for the ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship Mentoring Scheme at the University of Melbourne. This scheme is fully funded by the Australian Research Council and is a part of Professor Joy Damousi’s ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship. The scheme targets outstanding early career female researchers to complete an intensive mentoring programme with a focus on research leadership and enhancing career progression.

Further information about the scheme can be found here.

CJSDRC Briefing Paper Series – QLD Police Service

On 25 July 2018 Dr Monique Mann launched the new Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre Briefing Paper series at QLD Police Service (QPS) Headquarters. This event was hosted by the QPS Intelligence and Covert Services Command with representatives of the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, the Australian Federal Police and the QLD Crime and Corruption Commission in attendance.

At this event Dr Monique Mann presented her co-authored work with QUT Law Adjunct Dr Angela Daly on 3D Printing, Policing and Crime. A briefing paper covering this topic is available for free open access download. It provides background information on the intersections of 3D printing technology, policing, and crime. It canvasses the role of 3D printing as a tool, as a source of evidence, and as a potential threat for police agencies and wider public safety. The emergence of 3D printed firearms is considered in depth, and an overview of case studies where 3D firearms or firearm parts have been located and investigated by police are included. Finally, the legal and enforcement models implemented to address 3D printing technology to date in different jurisdictions are reviewed.

Policing in the South Pacific: University of the South Pacific

 

Image 1                                                                  Image 2

Image 1:  John Scott with members of the USP Policing Program, Danielle Watson and Casandra Harry

Image 2:  Vice Chancellor of the University of the South Pacific, Professor Rajesh Chandra

CJRC member and Acting Head of School of Justice at QUT, Professor John Scott, recently visited the University of the South Pacific’s main Fiji campus where he engaged with staff in the School of Social Sciences about a number of ongoing initiatives in the space of southern criminology. In particular, QUT staff, and staff of the Pacific Policing Program, USP, are collaborating on projects  looking at policing in the Pacific, and the ecology of crime in island communities.

The Discipline Coordinator of the USP Policing program, Dr Danielle Watson is an Adjunct with the School of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Recently published: Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms

Molly Dragiewicz, Jean Burgess, Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Michael Salter, Nicolas P. Suzor, Delanie Woodlock & Bridget Harris recently published Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms. Feminist Media Studies, 18(4), 609–625. https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2018.1447341

This article is part of a special issue of Feminist Media Studies on Online Misogyny, edited by Debbie Ging and Eugenia Siapera. Read more

Publication: ‘A lightbulb moment’: Using the theory of planned behaviour to explore the challenges and opportunities for early engagement of Australian men who use violence in their relationships

 

 

 

 

 

CJRC member, Dr. Michael Flood has recently published an article in Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

 Forsdike, K., Tarzia, L., Flood, M., Vlais, R., and Hegarty, K. “‘A lightbulb moment’: Using the theory of planned behaviour to explore the challenges and opportunities for early engagement of Australian men who use violence in their relationships.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence, (2018). DOI: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260518780778

 Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a common complex social and public health problem. Interventions for IPV male perpetrators are an essential component of an early and effective response. Yet little is known about how to engage men in interventions for help-seeking. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), we explored men’s perceptions of seeking help for an unhealthy relationship and how they could be supported to recognize their behavior and undertake change at an early stage. We recruited 23 men who were currently attending a men’s behavior change program in Australia to take part in focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. The TPB concepts of behavioral beliefs, perceived control, and subjective norms were found throughout the data. Behavioral beliefs covered four subthemes: self-awareness, self-reflection and agency, the influence of others to change, and needing the right message in the right place. Perceived control was connected to these men’s understandings of what it means to be a man. Subjective norms were rarely raised, but there was some indication that men’s perceptions of societal norms about men as violent influenced a perceived lack of agency to change behavior. Our findings highlight the complexity of, and challenges in, engaging men who may use violence before they reach crisis point and justice intervenes. Despite this, participating men could find acceptable an appropriately developed and easy-to-access intervention that enhances recognition of behaviors and provides links to supports. Health professionals or researchers developing early interventions targeting these men need to take the engagement challenges into account.