Publication: The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with Deakin University colleagues Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy, recently published ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

The article describes legal and human rights issues in three cases of transnational online offending involving extradition requests by the United States (US). These cases were selected as all suspects claimed the negative impacts of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were sufficient to deny extradition on human rights grounds. The authors demonstrate how recent developments in UK and Irish extradition law raise human rights and prosecutorial challenges specific to online offending that are not met by established protections under domestic and internationally sanctioned approaches to extradition, or human rights, law. In these cases, although the allegedly unlawful conduct occurred exclusively online and concurrent jurisdiction enables prosecution at both the source and location of harm, the authors demonstrate why national courts hearing extradition challenges are extremely reluctant to shift the trial forum. They conclude by discussing the implications of the new geographies of online offending for future criminological research and transnational criminal justice.

Keywords: Extradition, computer hacking, legal geography, human rights, autism spectrum disorders, Asperger’s syndrome.

The article can be accessed at this link:

Publication: Gender and Age in the Construction of Male Youth in the European Migration “Crisis”

The following article was recently published by Dr. Helen Berents from QUT School of Justice and member of CJRC, along with colleagues from Monash University and Salvation Army UK.  This article was published in Signs – a leading journal (Q1) for feminist politics.


Displacement is clearly gendered; age also has a strong influence on outcomes and experiences for the displaced, including a significant impact on how they are understood by the public and policy makers. It is important to keep this in mind when considering how children and youth are understood within contexts of conflict and insecurity, how they are affected by these forces, and how they navigate their lives in these contexts, especially in seeking peaceful outcomes. Here we engage with the current so-called European migration crisis as a potential watershed moment in understandings of children and youth as refugees. In particular, we suggest that the public representations of young people in this context can be deeply influenced by stereotypes and assumptions around gender and age that may—intentionally or inadvertently—lead to greater insecurity for people of diverse genders and ages. Likewise, we argue that when considering scholarship, policy, and practice in relation to migration, it is critical to develop and apply a lens that accounts for both gender and age.

A link to the full article can be found here


Media discourse surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims – The Ashley Madison data breach case

Media discourses surrounding ‘non-ideal’ victims

The case of the Ashley Madison data breach

Cassandra Cross, Megan Parker and Daniel Sansom


Data breaches are an increasingly common event across businesses globally. Many companies have been subject to large-scale breaches. Consequently, the exposure of 37 million customers of the Ashley Madison website is not an extraordinary event in and of itself. However, Ashley Madison is an online dating website predominantly known for facilitating extramarital affairs. Therefore, the nature of this website (and business) is very different from those that have previously been breached. This article examines one of the media discourses surrounding the victims of the Ashley Madison data breach. It particular, it illustrates examples of victim blaming evident in the print media towards individuals (or customers) who had their personal details exposed. Importantly, it highlights the emerging tension within this particular case, of the strong victim blaming narrative contrasted against those who attempted to challenge this discourse and refocus attention on the actual offenders, and the criminality of the act. The article concludes that victims of this data breach were exposed to victim blaming, based on the perceived immorality of the website they were connected to and their actions in subscribing, rather than focusing on the data breach itself, and the blatant criminality of the offenders who exposed the sensitive information.

Available online at the International Review of Victimology



Publication: “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep – the Hierarchy of Disaster” – Dr. Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published a new essay titled “Sleeping the deep, deep sleep.” Co-written with Dr Suzie Gibson of Charles Sturt University, the piece appears in Issue 229 of Overland Literary Journal:

Subtitled “The Hierarchy of Disaster,” the essay considers how human-made catastrophes are ordered so as to distinguish between worthy and unworthy victims. Commencing with a comparison of political and media responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US and the 1984 Bhopal tragedy in India, the essay considers how many traumatic occurrences are elided from the collective memory and justice is denied to those victims of disasters which occur beyond the “self-reverent gaze” of Western society. It concludes by suggesting that the starting point to diminishing this hierarchy, and in turn confronting the ubiquity of disaster itself, must be an ethical recalibration on the part of first world governments.

In recent months Dean has also published work in The Guardian, The Conversation, Popular Music and Society and Metro Screen Journal.

Dean is currently coordinating the QUT Justice undergraduate subject ‘Deviance.’

Dr Cassandra Cross wins two awards at #ANZSOC 2017

Dr Cassandra Cross, Senior Lecturer, School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT was won two awards at the 2017 ANZSOC Conference.

The first is for the best publication by a new scholar in 2016 – ‘They’re Very Lonely’: Understanding the Fraud Victimisation of Seniors’ International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, Vol 6 (4).

The second is the Adam Sutton Crime Prevention Award for the best publication or report on Crime Prevention.

Congratulations Cassandra from your colleagues at CJRC.

Latest Issue of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Available Now!

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

The latest issue of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. Volume 5, Number 2 is a Special Issue titled “Fighting Feminism: Organised Opposition to Women’s Rights” and features papers by international feminist scholars, including guest editior and CJRC member, Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz. To access the articles, click on the links below. Read more

Recently Published — “Harm reduction and the ethics of drug use: contemporary techniques of self-governance”

Dr Margaret Pereira and Professor John Scott from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, have co-authored an article recently published in the journal Health Sociology Review titled “Harm reduction and the ethics of drug use: contemporary techniques of self-governance.”

Read more