International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy ranks 14th

Last week was International Open Access Week 2019 (October 21-27). As an open access publication the Journal is committed to democratising quality knowledge production and the dissemination of criminological research. The Journal’s achievements in open access are reflected in the latest Scimago journal rankings. Of the top 50 open access law journals ranked internationally, the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy ranks 14th. The Journal is ranked as the top open access law journal in the Pacific Region. The Scimago Journal and Country Rank is a publicly available portal that includes the journals and country scientific indicators developed from the information contained in the Scopus® database (Elsevier B.V.). Citation data is drawn from over 34,100 titles from more than 5,000 international publishers and country performance metrics from 239 countries worldwide.

Alignment to open access practices in academic publishing has not been an arbitrary consideration and compliments emerging global practices and trends in academic publishing. Open scholarship and open access publishing maximises the sharing of knowledge. For the author the benefits of publishing in open access include: increased citation and impact; improved visibility in terms of public engagement and interest, and; the reduction of prohibitive publishing barriers related to costs. Universities benefit from wider dissemination of research and by access to a wider range of educational resources.

Achieving best practice in open access is a cumulative result of the Journal’s ongoing support from QUT Library, the QUT Faculty of Law, QUT’s Centre for Justice and the sustained attention to good practice from the editorial team, authors, reviewers and the the International Editorial Board

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Interested in curating a special issue for the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy? This open access, peer reviewed publication is ranked as the top Law journal in Australia (Scopus Q2) and publishes critical research about challenges confronting criminal justice systems around the world. The journal publishes four issues annually with an emphasis on democratising quality knowledge production and dissemination through open access publishing. Recent special issues have included topics such as green criminology, theoretical scholarship around criminology, corruption and southern criminology. Upcoming special issues in 2020 include an issue on state violence enacted on marginal and vulnerable populations in Australia and abroad, and collaborative outputs from panel sessions at this years’ UN 63rd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women.

The Editorial team are now considering expressions of interest for special issues for 2021. EOI guidelines are included in the Journal’s Author Guidelines and at https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/public/journals/4/IJCJSD_EOI_SpecialIssue.pdf – or direct any questions to the Editors at crimjournal@qut.edu.au

Special Issue – International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. This special issue Towards Global Green Criminological Dialogues: Voices from the Americas and Europe is a timely publication which strives to present diverse voices to support the goal of Southern criminology to level inequalities in the valuing of criminological knowledge in the Global North and the Global South. Guest editors David Rodríguez Goyes, Ragnhild Sollund and Nigel South present six articles and three book reviews (most co-written by Latin American and ‘Northern’ authors) with an aim to “create ‘Global Green Criminological Dialogues’ rather than just reproduce ‘voices from Latin America’ “.

Highlights include Yaneth Katia Apaza Huanca’s interpretation of Pachamama (sacred Mother Earth) in Non-Western Epistemology and the Understanding of the Pachamama (Environment) Within the World(s) of the Aymara Identity; and Ragnhild Sollund, Ángela Maldonado and Claudia Brieva Rico’s analysis of the global measures applied to counteract climate change, and the effects these measures have on local peripheral communities in The Norway–Colombia Agreement to Protect Rainforest and Reduce Global Warming: Success or Failure? In the article Between ‘Conservation’ and ‘Development’: The Construction of ‘Protected Nature’ and the Environmental Disenfranchisement of Indigenous Communities, David R. Goyes and Nigel South discuss hidden intentions behind conservation projects, arguing that development projects and conservation projects often share the effect of environmentally disenfranchising Indigenous communities.

Any enquiries regarding the Journal should be forwarded to Tracy Creagh, Journal Manager – t.creagh@qut.edu.au

Wanted: New Book Review Editor for IJCJSD

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is looking to appoint a new Book Review editor – or editors. The Editorial team will consider two editors in this space – one for the Global North and one for the Global South.

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is an open access, blind peer reviewed journal that publishes critical research about challenges confronting criminal justice systems around the world. The journal publishes four issues per year and is ranked as the top Law journal in Australia in the latest Scimago Journal & Country Rankings (2018).

All queries regarding this role can be made direct to Chief-Editor Professor Kerry Carrington k.carrington@qut.edu.au

Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Journal, 2nd Issue, 2019

The second issue for 2019 of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. With 10 articles and two book reviews, this general issue includes authors from Fiji, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Belgium, Argentina and the United States.

Content includes a discussion of the implications of sexual autonomy of children under international child rights regime upon Indian law (Lina Mathew) and an historical perspective of the role of sex worker activists in the decriminalisation of sex work in the state of New South Wales in Australia (Eurydice Aroney and Penny Crofts). Authors Stephen Tomsen and David Gadd also present the findings of their study of views about violence among a mixed cohort of young men, suggesting caution about the potential alienation of men by trivialising their own understandings as both perpetrators and victims.

We are also very pleased to publish the results of Caroline Doyle’s fieldwork in the Latin American city of Medellin, Columbia to understand the significant reduction in homicides in this city in recent times and how the real and perceived violence continues to have a significant effect on residents’ lives. This article is published in English and Spanish thanks to the generosity of the author who translated the paper.

This issue also contains two book reviews: Jatindra Kumar Das’s text Human Rights Law and Practice: Equal Rights (reviewed by Lina Mathew); and, Bianca Fileborn’s Reclaiming the Night-Time economy: Unwanted Sexual Attention in Pubs and Clubs (reviewed by QUT’s Justine Hotten).

We encourage you to share this information with your networks over the coming weeks and, as always, welcome any feedback you might have. The Journal is also on Twitter

Any enquiries regarding the journal should be forwarded to Tracy Creagh, Journal Manager – t.creagh@qut.edu.au

 

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Editorial Board welcomes 31 new members

Welcome to 31 new members of the International editorial board

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is an open access, blind peer reviewed journal committed to democratising the production and dissemination of knowledge. It has a distinguished International Editorial Board comprised of 104 leading scholars from 25 countries. Last year the journal was ranked for the very first time by SciMago as a Q2 journal with the highest impact factor for Law and Criminology in Australia. This year it has remained a Q2 ranked journal and has the second highest impact factor of any journal published in Australia in law and criminology. This is a remarkable feat for a journal as young as this one in a global system of knowledge that privileges journals published in Europe, United Kingdom and United States. It is continuing to grow in stature and impact. Articles have been downloaded 270,000 times and abstract viewed 353,000 times since its firsts publication in 2012. The journal receives between 4-6 submissions per week from all over the world. As a consequence we have had to grow the international editorial board to meet the increased demand.

The Editors of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy have recently undertaken a global search for scholars whose expertise would fit with the vision of the journal to join the distinguished International Editorial Board. We warmly welcome the new 31 members listed below:

Dr. Jerjes Aguirre Ochoa, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Mexico

Associate Professor Thalia Anthony University of Technology, Sydney

Dr Lynzi Armstrong Wellington University, New Zealand

Professor Matias Bailone, Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aries, Argentina

Professor Rosemary Barberet, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York

Dr Jarrett Blaustien, Monash University, Melbourne

Associate Professor Rebbeca Scott Bray, University of Sydney

Professor Melissa Bull, Griffith University, Brisbane

Professor Vania Ceccato, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweeden

Dr Lennon Chang, Monash University, Melbourne

Professor Bill Dixon, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom

Dr Asher Flynn, Monash University Melbourne

Dr Bianca Fileborn UNSW, Sydney

Dr Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University, Melbourne

Dr David Fonseca Brazil, University of Brazillia, Brazil

Assistant Professor David Goyes, Universidad Antonio Nariño, Colombia

Assistant Professor Kate Henne, University of Waterloo, Canada

Associate Professor Nicola Henry, RMIT, Melbourne

Professor Kristian Lasslett Ulster University, North Ireland

Dr Alyce McGovern, UNSW, Sydney

Professor Julia Monárrez El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

Dr Leon Mossavi, Open University Singapore

Associate Professor Ross McGarry, University of Liverpool, UK

Associate Professor Darren Palmer Deakin University, Geelong

Professor Nathan Pino, Texas State University, US

Associate Professor Julia Quilter University of Wollongong

Professor Richard Sparks, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Associate Professor Max Travers, University of Tasmania

Dr Danielle Watson, University of the South Pacific, Fiji

Professor Alison Young, University of Melbourne, Melbourne

Dr Yuan Xiaoyu, University of Law and Political Science, China

New Issue: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy has been published today.  With authors from Brazil/Portugal, Croatia, Italy, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia, the journal’s global representation continues.

There are nine articles in this issue book-ended by Sandra Walklate’s “Criminology, Gender and Risk:  The Dilemmas of Northern Theorising for Southern Responses to Intimate Partner Violence”, and Aleksandar Marsavelski and John Braithwaite who provide insights into “The Best Way to Rob a Bank”.  Additionally, Matt Ball has authored one of two terrific book reviews:  Marianna Valverde’s Michel Voucault (2017).

The following articles are free to download and share.

Current Issue

Vol 7 No 1 (2018): International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Published: 2018-03-01

Articles

Sandra Walklate

1-14

Thiago Pierobom de Avila

15-29

Jason Spraitz, Kendra N Bowen, Louisa Strange

30-43

Tully O’Neill

44-59

Antonio Iudici, Fela Boccato, Elena Faccio

60-75

Sophie De’Ath, Catherine Anne Flynn, Melanie Field-Pimm

76-90

David Rodríguez Goyes

91-107

Ida Nafstad

108-122

Aleksandar Marsavelski, John Braithwaite

123-138

Book Reviews

139-142

143-145

View All Issues

VC Excellence Awards for Law and Justice Staff

Today the VC Awards for Excellence were presented by the Dean, Professor John Humphrey for staff in the Faculty Award. The winners, photographed above, included an award for Alison McIntosh, in recognition of her outstanding management as Journal Editor of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.

Dr Matthew Ball, Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, was presented with two awards, one for Excellence in Research and the other for Excellence in Teaching.

Professor John Scott, Dr Bridget Harris and Robyn Johnston were presented with a VC Excellence Award for their organistion of the International Conference, on Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South, which was a tremendous success.

 

 

Vol 6 (4) International Journal for Crime, Justice & Social Democracy just published

Vol 6(4), the special edition of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy on ‘Corruption Downunder’ edited by Scott Poynting and David Whyte, has been published online (as of today, 1 December 2017). The article are free to download and to share.  Please send/tweet/share to your lists.

You will see on the journal’s home page, ahead of the Table of Contents for the issue, that this journal was recently ranked in Q2 by Scopus and has been scored as the top Law journal in Australia. We hope this distinction for the journal will contribute towards interest in your articles and the issue as a whole.

Invitation – Journal Launch: ‘Limits and Prospects of Criminal Law Reform – Past, Present, Future’

Date: 15 November, 5:30pm Location: UTS Law Building (5B, 3.18)

You are invited to the launch of the special edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy on ‘Limits and Prospects of Criminal Law Reform – Past, Present, Future’ (2017, Vol 6, No 3). A number of the authors from this special edition will reflect on developments and obstacles in criminal law reform.

This special edition arose out of the national Criminal Law Workshop hosted at UTS in 2016, it includes the following articles:

See the full version at: https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/index

Please RSVP to Aline Roux at Aline.Roux@uts.edu.au