Inaugural issue: Law, Technology and Humans

The inaugural issue of Law, Technology and Humans is now online.

Law, Technology and Humans is an international, open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing original, innovative research concerned with the human and humanity of law and technology.

In his introduction to the new publication, General Editor Professor Kieran Tranter notes:

Law, Technology and Humans aims for something different from the mainstream of technology law scholarship. Rather than repeating analysis born from the dominant narrative, it boldly presents itself as a portal to the multiverse of stories and methods through which to understand, dream, critique, build and live well in the technological present as it, with every planetary rotation, moves towards the technological future.

The foundation issue is in two parts. The first is a collection of papers aligned to the recent symposium: Automation and Disruption in the Legal Profession and includes articles related to the future of the legal profession, a new curriculum approach to learning within the legal academy,  interpretations of NewLaw practice in Australia, the utilisation of technologies in the community legal sector and experiential ethics for the lawyer/AI hybrid.

The second part of this issue is dedicated to general articles examining law and technology on a broader scale including the use of robo-advisors in the financial services market and the legal consequences of social media use by employees. The Journal also includes a review of Virginia Eubanks recent book Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor by journal book review editor Faith Gordon.

Submissions are now being accepted for Volume 2, Issue 1 to be published in May 2020

Follow Journal announcements on Twitter @LawTechHum

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy – Volume 8 Issue 4 2019


A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. This final issue for 2019 features a variety of topics and authors from Mexico, US, Australia, Turkey, Zimbabwe and Thailand.

Included in the issue is a mixed-methods study examining how criminologists in Australia and New Zealand have employed social media to engage in public criminology. Mark Wood, Imogen Richards, Mary Iliadis and Michael McDermott (from the University of Melbourne and Deakin University, Australia) note that social media has and continues to change the terrain for researchers facilitating new forms of news making within the discipline of criminology. Women’s prison reform is explored in North-Eastern Thailand with an application to international human rights standards. With one of the highest incarceration rates of women in the world, practitioners from Mahidol University, Thailand discuss the implementation of ‘Bangkok Rules’ finding that despite extensive reforms areas for improvement remain.

Policing and organised crime are the topics of four articles: The Colombian National Police and the Politics of Crime Control Evaluations, Kenneth Sebastian León; Community Policing and Crime Prevention: Evaluating the Role of Traditional Leaders under Chief Madliwa in Nkayi District, Zimbabwe, Whitehead Zikhali; Police Officers’ Fear of Crime: An Analysis of Interviews with Officers in Trinidad and Tobago, Lee Michael Johnson, Danielle Watson and Nathan Pino, and; Local Elections and Organised Crime: The Case of Michoacán, Mexico, Jerjes Aguirre Ochoa, Hugo Amador Herrera Torres.

Another highlight of the issue is Sandra Walklate and Kate Fitz-Gibbon’s examination of coercive control within the legal context. Intimate partner violence has long been seen through the lens of coercive control and the authors suggest that the criminalisation of coercive control only serves to fail those it is intended to protect.

Any enquiries regarding the Journal should be forwarded to Tracy Creagh, Journal Manager – crimjournal@qut.edu.au

Publication: Centre for Justice Research Report Series, Vol1/2019

QUT Centre for Justice launched its first edition of the Centre for Justice Research Report Series.  This series will publish reports up to 6 times a year on current research relating to crime and justice.

This first edition outlines the findings of the ARC-funded research of Professor Kerry Carrington and her multi-country team of researchers into how women’s police stations in Argentina have helped to prevent domestic family violence

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy ranks 14th

Last week was International Open Access Week 2019 (October 21-27). As an open access publication the Journal is committed to democratising quality knowledge production and the dissemination of criminological research. The Journal’s achievements in open access are reflected in the latest Scimago journal rankings. Of the top 50 open access law journals ranked internationally, the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy ranks 14th. The Journal is ranked as the top open access law journal in the Pacific Region. The Scimago Journal and Country Rank is a publicly available portal that includes the journals and country scientific indicators developed from the information contained in the Scopus® database (Elsevier B.V.). Citation data is drawn from over 34,100 titles from more than 5,000 international publishers and country performance metrics from 239 countries worldwide.

Alignment to open access practices in academic publishing has not been an arbitrary consideration and compliments emerging global practices and trends in academic publishing. Open scholarship and open access publishing maximises the sharing of knowledge. For the author the benefits of publishing in open access include: increased citation and impact; improved visibility in terms of public engagement and interest, and; the reduction of prohibitive publishing barriers related to costs. Universities benefit from wider dissemination of research and by access to a wider range of educational resources.

Achieving best practice in open access is a cumulative result of the Journal’s ongoing support from QUT Library, the QUT Faculty of Law, QUT’s Centre for Justice and the sustained attention to good practice from the editorial team, authors, reviewers and the the International Editorial Board

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Interested in curating a special issue for the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy? This open access, peer reviewed publication is ranked as the top Law journal in Australia (Scopus Q2) and publishes critical research about challenges confronting criminal justice systems around the world. The journal publishes four issues annually with an emphasis on democratising quality knowledge production and dissemination through open access publishing. Recent special issues have included topics such as green criminology, theoretical scholarship around criminology, corruption and southern criminology. Upcoming special issues in 2020 include an issue on state violence enacted on marginal and vulnerable populations in Australia and abroad, and collaborative outputs from panel sessions at this years’ UN 63rd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women.

The Editorial team are now considering expressions of interest for special issues for 2021. EOI guidelines are included in the Journal’s Author Guidelines and at https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/public/journals/4/IJCJSD_EOI_SpecialIssue.pdf – or direct any questions to the Editors at crimjournal@qut.edu.au

Special Issue – International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. This special issue Towards Global Green Criminological Dialogues: Voices from the Americas and Europe is a timely publication which strives to present diverse voices to support the goal of Southern criminology to level inequalities in the valuing of criminological knowledge in the Global North and the Global South. Guest editors David Rodríguez Goyes, Ragnhild Sollund and Nigel South present six articles and three book reviews (most co-written by Latin American and ‘Northern’ authors) with an aim to “create ‘Global Green Criminological Dialogues’ rather than just reproduce ‘voices from Latin America’ “.

Highlights include Yaneth Katia Apaza Huanca’s interpretation of Pachamama (sacred Mother Earth) in Non-Western Epistemology and the Understanding of the Pachamama (Environment) Within the World(s) of the Aymara Identity; and Ragnhild Sollund, Ángela Maldonado and Claudia Brieva Rico’s analysis of the global measures applied to counteract climate change, and the effects these measures have on local peripheral communities in The Norway–Colombia Agreement to Protect Rainforest and Reduce Global Warming: Success or Failure? In the article Between ‘Conservation’ and ‘Development’: The Construction of ‘Protected Nature’ and the Environmental Disenfranchisement of Indigenous Communities, David R. Goyes and Nigel South discuss hidden intentions behind conservation projects, arguing that development projects and conservation projects often share the effect of environmentally disenfranchising Indigenous communities.

Any enquiries regarding the Journal should be forwarded to Tracy Creagh, Journal Manager – t.creagh@qut.edu.au

Domestic violence and technology: Findings and future pathways

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present findings from the ACCAN funded study Domestic violence and communication technology: Victim experiences of intrusion, surveillance, and identity theft. This free public seminar will present key findings from the report on survivor experiences of technology-facilitated coercive control.

26 June, 2019
4:00 pm-5:30 pm
Room P419, Level 4, P Block, Gardens Point Campus

Download the report and infographics here

Information about the research team, future presentations, and publications is here.

Wanted: New Book Review Editor for IJCJSD

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is looking to appoint a new Book Review editor – or editors. The Editorial team will consider two editors in this space – one for the Global North and one for the Global South.

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is an open access, blind peer reviewed journal that publishes critical research about challenges confronting criminal justice systems around the world. The journal publishes four issues per year and is ranked as the top Law journal in Australia in the latest Scimago Journal & Country Rankings (2018).

All queries regarding this role can be made direct to Chief-Editor Professor Kerry Carrington k.carrington@qut.edu.au

Ask LOIS webinar on Domestic violence and communication technology

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris will present an Ask LOIS webinar on Domestic violence and communication technology
20 June, 2019
11:00 am-11:30 am
Register here https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/974592111259198209

Read more

Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Journal, 2nd Issue, 2019

The second issue for 2019 of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is now available. With 10 articles and two book reviews, this general issue includes authors from Fiji, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Belgium, Argentina and the United States.

Content includes a discussion of the implications of sexual autonomy of children under international child rights regime upon Indian law (Lina Mathew) and an historical perspective of the role of sex worker activists in the decriminalisation of sex work in the state of New South Wales in Australia (Eurydice Aroney and Penny Crofts). Authors Stephen Tomsen and David Gadd also present the findings of their study of views about violence among a mixed cohort of young men, suggesting caution about the potential alienation of men by trivialising their own understandings as both perpetrators and victims.

We are also very pleased to publish the results of Caroline Doyle’s fieldwork in the Latin American city of Medellin, Columbia to understand the significant reduction in homicides in this city in recent times and how the real and perceived violence continues to have a significant effect on residents’ lives. This article is published in English and Spanish thanks to the generosity of the author who translated the paper.

This issue also contains two book reviews: Jatindra Kumar Das’s text Human Rights Law and Practice: Equal Rights (reviewed by Lina Mathew); and, Bianca Fileborn’s Reclaiming the Night-Time economy: Unwanted Sexual Attention in Pubs and Clubs (reviewed by QUT’s Justine Hotten).

We encourage you to share this information with your networks over the coming weeks and, as always, welcome any feedback you might have. The Journal is also on Twitter

Any enquiries regarding the journal should be forwarded to Tracy Creagh, Journal Manager – t.creagh@qut.edu.au