Webinar: Using App-Based and Sensing Methods for Social Science Research

Last week, CJSDRC researcher Dr Michael Chataway, and Dr Reka Solymosi from the University of Manchester presented a webinar on app based and sensing methods for social science research.

The webinar, co-hosted by the UK Data Service and Methods@Manchester was designed to discuss the use of mobile apps and sensing technologies in the social sciences, with a particular focus on measuring context-dependent fear of crime. The webinar was attended by over 70 individuals from academic, private, and public sectors.

The webinar and PowerPoint slides can be accessed here: https://www.ukdataservice.ac.uk/news-and-events/eventsitem/?id=5461

Researcher Bio’s:

Reka Solymosi is a lecturer in quantitative methods focused on making use of new forms of data to gain insight into people’s behaviour and subjective experiences, particularly focusing on crime, transport, and spatial research. She is also interested in promoting data literacy.

Michael Chataway is a lecturer at the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology. His research focuses on measuring and responding to fear of crime using mobile technologies. Michael’s other research interests include social geography, environmental psychology, and digital methods.

Prof. Kerry Carrington: United Nations Commission on the Status of Women #CSW63

Our very own Head of School, Professor Kerry Carrington, is speaking at the United Nations 63rd Commission on the Status of Women NGO Sessions in New York today.  Kerry will present with a member of her research team and QUT PhD student, Maria Victoria Puyol.

Kerry will present her research findings into women’s only police stations in Argentina and their impact on preventing gendered violence.  This is a practical and successful response to the United Nations sustainable development goal to eliminate violence against women.

Kerry appeared on ABC Radio National Law Report on 19 March to talk about her research.  Listen to her interview here

You can download the presentation here

Amazing research impact.  Congratulations Kerry from all of us at QUT School of Justice.

 

 

 

 

Presentation: Reflections on women, men, sexual violence and #MeToo

(L-R) Police Commissioner Ian Stewart; Director, CJSDRC Professor Melissa Bull; Professor James W. Messerschmidt; Belinda Cox and Associate Professor Michael Flood

Last night QUT’s CJSDRC hosted two leading international scholars who reflected on the #MeToo movement and the promise and pitfalls of current efforts to end sexual violence, and the role of men in sexual violence prevention.

Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Criminology Department at the University of Southern Maine, USA, James W. Messerschmidt and our own Associate Professor Michael Flood drew on their experiences as scholars and activists in the gender violence field to lead a provocative workshop that asked,  What does #MeToo mean for men and women? How should men and women respond? What roles in particular can men play in building a community free of sexual violence and abuse? What does the research tell us is effective in engaging men in this work? More widely, what are the strengths and limitations of #MeToo as a way of organising against sexual violence?

Unsurprisingly this stimulated animated discussion between the presenters and the nearly 100 workshop participants who included practitioners who work with offenders and victims, legal advocates, police, academics, community members and white ribbon ambassadors. The workshop demonstrated that while #MeToo might not be the answer, it has simulated new and important conversations that could contribute to the prevention of a disturbingly prevalent and serious social problem.

Essay-“Ordinary People”-Dr Dean Biron

School of Justice affiliated academic Dr Dean Biron has published an essay titled “Ordinary People,” which appears in the Autumn 2019 edition of Meanjin Quarterly.

“Ordinary People” is a quasi-memoir piece reflecting upon the author’s experience of dealing with historical sexual abuse investigations while working as a detective in the Queensland Police Service between 1998 and 2004. The essay considers the impediments to justice faced by abuse victims and concludes by suggesting that their extraordinary courage can help provide a paradigm for broader social reform in Australia.

Dean’s previous writing has appeared in such publications as Child Abuse & Neglect, The Journal of Family Violence, Overland, Children Australia, Metro Magazine, Thesis Eleven, Rock Music Studies and Portal: the Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies. His contribution to Meanjin’s “What I’m Reading” blog series will appear in April.

Dean is currently teaching in QUT Justice undergraduate subjects ‘Deviance’ and ‘Policing in Context’.  A full copy of the essay can be found here – https://meanjin.com.au/current-edition/

Workshop – Bogota Universidad Catolica de Colombia – 6-8 November 2019

Conflict, Power and Justice in the Global South

Academic knowledge about conflict, power and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape. In the last decades, there have been substantial efforts to undo these colonized ways of producing knowledge in this field.

This three-day workshop in Colombia brings together scholars, practitioners and activists from across the globe to contribute to this task of southernizing and democratising knowledge.

The workshop aims to link northern and southern activists and scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges. It builds upon the international workshop on Southern Criminology co-hosted by QUT and Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina in November 2018; and seeks to combine presentations with group discussions around the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the Southern Criminology project.

This workshop will be co-hosted by Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Universidad Autónoma de México; Universidad Católica Colombia; University of Essex, UK; Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina; University of Northumbria, UK; and, University of Oslo, Norway.

Abstracts of 250 words

Due 30 June 2019

Early submission advised as the workshop is limited to 100

Email to:  justice@qut.edu.au

The workshop will be convened in two languages: Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of Critical Criminology

 

Migrant women and technology-facilitated domestic abuse 

Book: Good Data

Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with former QUT Law colleagues Drs Angela Daly and S. Kate Devitt, recently published the open access edited text Good Data.

In response to the totalising datafication of society, there has been a significant critique regarding ‘bad data’ practices. The book Good Data proposes a move from critique to imagining and articulating a more optimistic vision of the datafied future. Good Data examines and proposes ‘good data’ practices, values and principles from an interdisciplinary, international perspective. From ideas of data sovereignty and justice, to manifestos for change and calls for activism, this edited collection opens a multifaceted conversation on the kinds of digital futures we want to see. The book presents concrete steps on how we can start realising good data in practice, and move towards a fair and just digital economy and society.

The Good Data book was launched (via QR code) on Thursday the 24th of January in Amsterdam in collaboration with the publisher Institute of Network Cultures (INC Amsterdam) and the ERC funded research programme DATACTIVE at the University of Amsterdam. Around 150 people attended the event where Monique Mann introduced the book, alongside a panel of contributors who discussed their chapters.

The book can be found here for free download (in various formats):

The Institute of Network Cultures has published a series of blogposts from Good Data authors summarising their Good Data interventions, including a post by the editors outlining 15 principles of Good Data, which can be found here:

Review of Indigenous Policy in Cape York

A reduction in harmful alcohol consumption, drugs, violence and crime are among outcomes of 10 years of the Cape York Income Management program, a strategic review of the program by QUT School of Justice researchers, including John Scott, Angela Higginson and Mark Lauchs, has found.

Income management was one measure in the Cape York Welfare Reform (CYWR) initiative implemented in 2008 to address ‘passive dependence’ on welfare and improve social capital in Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

The review was conducted in the light of Cape York communities looking to make a decision about moving to new arrangements based on the empowerment/development model.

The review will help inform decisions on the future of welfare quarantining in Cape York and the role current income management practices could have in any future models.

The full report can be found at:

https://www.dss.gov.au/families-and-children-programs-services-welfare-quarantining-income-management/strategic-review-of-cape-york-income-management

 

Research: Young people with cognitive disabilities and their experiences with police

Young people with cognitive disabilities are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. While about 4% of young men and 3% of young women have a cognitive disability in Australia, a much higher proportion of young people in detention (about 14%) has some form of cognitive impairment.

To contribute towards understanding this problem, Dr Kelly Richards (School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology) and Dr Kathy Ellem (School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland) recently undertook interdisciplinary research on young people with cognitive disabilities’ first point of contact with the criminal justice system: the police. Funded by the Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation, the research drew on the disciplines of criminology, social work and disability studies, and involved interviews with service providers who work with young people with cognitive disabilities in south-east Queensland. The project also sought the views of young people themselves, and for the first time, gave voice to three young people with cognitive disabilities who had been in contact with the police.
The research yielded a number of key insights that make a significant contribution to this under-examined topic:

• Service providers identified the phenomenon of “escalation” – ie, that once in an interaction with police, young people with cognitive disabilities face a range of difficulties exiting or evading police contact in ways that other young people usually successfully manage. Young people with cognitive disability may become highly visible to police and are at heightened risk of cycling in and out of the criminal justice system as offenders.
• Service providers also identified that young people with cognitive disabilities often come into increased contact with police due to the complex constellations of disadvantage that this group commonly experiences, such as homelessness, being in out-of-home care, co-morbid mental health conditions, and poverty. Further, a young person with cognitive disability may present with complex behavioural issues that others close to them find difficult to manage. Parents of young people and youth residential workers have been reported to deliberately involve the police as a strategy to cope with a young person’s challenging behaviours, again leading to increased police contact.
Young people with cognitive disabilities themselves reported in their interviews that being treated by police in ways that are “procedurally just” (ie being able to have a say, being treated with dignity, respect and fairness) enhanced their interactions with police. For example, 18-year-old “Justin” appeared to have a positive experience of citizen participation in his interaction with police. He reported having being supported by his disability worker to make a statement to police about a physical assault he had experienced. He reported that the police were “nice”, gave him time to explain things and directed some questions to his disability support worker, which he found helpful.
Findings from the study underscore the urgent need for better non-criminal justice supports for families of young people with cognitive disabilities, skill development in staff of youth services to better respond to complex behaviours of young people, as well as improved police training on issues of both youth and disability. The authors have recently been invited to present their research to Queensland‘s Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women.

Publications from the research:
Richards, K., Ellem, K., Grevis-James, N. and Dwyer, A. (2017) Young people with cognitive impairments’ interactions with police in Queensland: A report to the Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation. Brisbane: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/109470/

Ellem, K. and Richards, K. (2018) Police contact with young people with cognitive disabilities: Perceptions of procedural (in)justice. Youth Justice: An International Journal https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1473225418794357

Richards, K. and Ellem, K. (2018) Young people with cognitive impairments and overrepresentation in the criminal justice system: Service provider perspectives. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15614263.2018.1473771

Book, Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention


Associate Professor Michael Flood has published a new book, Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention.

Across the globe, violence prevention initiatives focused on men and boys are proliferating rapidly. Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention highlights effective and innovative strategies for the primary prevention of domestic violence, sexual violence, and other forms of harassment and abuse. It combines research on gender, masculinities, and violence with case studies from a wide variety of countries and settings. Through the cross-disciplinary examination of these varied efforts, this work will enable advocates, educators, and policy-makers to understand, assess, and implement programs and strategies which involve men and boys in initiatives to prevent violence against women.

The book is available from: https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137442109

Citation:

Flood, M. (2018). Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.