CJSDRC Briefing Paper Series – QLD Police Service

On 25 July 2018 Dr Monique Mann launched the new Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre Briefing Paper series at QLD Police Service (QPS) Headquarters. This event was hosted by the QPS Intelligence and Covert Services Command with representatives of the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, the Australian Federal Police and the QLD Crime and Corruption Commission in attendance.

At this event Dr Monique Mann presented her co-authored work with QUT Law Adjunct Dr Angela Daly on 3D Printing, Policing and Crime. A briefing paper covering this topic is available for free open access download. It provides background information on the intersections of 3D printing technology, policing, and crime. It canvasses the role of 3D printing as a tool, as a source of evidence, and as a potential threat for police agencies and wider public safety. The emergence of 3D printed firearms is considered in depth, and an overview of case studies where 3D firearms or firearm parts have been located and investigated by police are included. Finally, the legal and enforcement models implemented to address 3D printing technology to date in different jurisdictions are reviewed.

CJSDRC presents at 25th World Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA)

Michael Wilson, Dr Erin O’Brien, Michelle Ringrose and Dr Helen Berents at the IPSA 25th World Congress

This week four members of the CJSDRC (Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) presented at the 25th World Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA); joining over 2000 delegates in Brisbane from the 21-25 July. 

 The IPSA World Congress brings together delegates from over the world to discuss diverse and pressing issues facing political institutions and political practices at local, national and international levels. This year’s theme was ‘Borders and Margins’.

 Across four busy days Dr Erin O’Brien, Dr Helen Berents, Michelle Ringrose, and Michael Wilson presented on several exciting research projects they are currently undertaking. Dr Erin O’Brien and PhD Candidate Michael Wilson presented a paper together on “Alternative tweeting: reclaiming institutions from the Trump Presidency” in a session on political participation on the internet. Michelle Ringrose, also a PhD Candidate with the Centre, presented on her ongoing PhD research with a paper titled “Gendered Narratives in Genocidal Crimes: An Analysis of Civil Society Representations of the Yazidi Genocide”.  Dr Helen Berents’ paper, in a session on violence, images and world politics was titled “Violence, Compassion and Spectacle: The Politics of Sharing Images of Suffering Children”

 

Policing in the South Pacific: University of the South Pacific

 

Image 1                                                                  Image 2

Image 1:  John Scott with members of the USP Policing Program, Danielle Watson and Casandra Harry

Image 2:  Vice Chancellor of the University of the South Pacific, Professor Rajesh Chandra

CJRC member and Acting Head of School of Justice at QUT, Professor John Scott, recently visited the University of the South Pacific’s main Fiji campus where he engaged with staff in the School of Social Sciences about a number of ongoing initiatives in the space of southern criminology. In particular, QUT staff, and staff of the Pacific Policing Program, USP, are collaborating on projects  looking at policing in the Pacific, and the ecology of crime in island communities.

The Discipline Coordinator of the USP Policing program, Dr Danielle Watson is an Adjunct with the School of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Research: Study of Women’s Police Stations in Argentina

Kerry pictured with Superintendent Mabel Christina Rojas, Ministry of Security, Buenos Aries, Argentina (Photo taken by Dr Diego Zysman, a Senior Researcher on the Project)

 

Professor Kerry Carrington was awarded an ARC Discovery Grant (2018-2020) to study the prevention of gendered violence. As part of that study she will be studying the preventative impact of Women’s Police Stations in Argentina with Partner Investigator – Professor Máximo Sozzo Universidad Nacional de Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina. The Buenos Aries province of Argentina has 138 Women’s Police Stations that employ over 2300 personnel.

Little is known in the English speaking academy about how societies in the global south have approached the prevention of gendered violence. Brazil was the first country in Latin America to establish women’s only police stations in 1985.  Since then, women’s police stations have been established in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, and Uruguay, and more recently in Sierra Leone, India, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Liberia, the Philippines, South Africa and Uganda. A 2011 United Nations Women evaluation found that women only police stations in Latin America enhanced women’s access to justice and their willingness to report, increased the likelihood of conviction, and enlarged access to a range of other services such as counselling, health, legal, financial and social support. Of those surveyed for the evaluation, 77% in Brazil, 77% in Nicaragua, 64% in Ecuador and 57% in Peru felt that women only police stations had reduced violence against women in their countries (Jubb et al 2010).  Women’s only police stations emerged historically at a time of re-democratisation in Latin America. They were designed to enhance women’s confidence in the criminal justice system, encourage reporting, prevent re-victimization, and send a message to the community that gendered violence was no longer tolerated and men who abuse women will be made accountable.

A more recent study of WPS in Brazil used female homicides as a proxy measure for assessing their effectiveness. They compared 2074 municipalities from 2004 to 2009 and found that ‘women’s police stations appear to be highly effective among young women living in metropolitan areas’ . The  homicide rate dropped by 17 per cent for all women, but for women aged 15-24 in metropolitan areas the reduction was 50 per cent (or 5.57 deaths reduction per 100,000) (Perova and Reynolds 2017: 193-194).

Kerry now has all the approvals necessary to conduct the research and will commence in July this year.

You can listen to a broadcast about the research project aired Friday afternoon 27 April 2018 on the Multicultural Show – Community Radio Interview 4EB  by clicking the link below.

http://www.4eb.org.au/node/41

Recently published: Resistance and backlash to gender equality: An evidence review

Crime and Justice Research Centre members Associate Professor Michael Flood and Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Deakin University Honorary Professor Bob Pease recently published Resistance and backlash to gender equality: An evidence review Read more

Event: Defending Truth Internet Freedom Hack

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann is speaking at the ‘Defending Truth Internet Freedom Hack’ to be held this weekend (20-22nd of April) across both Brisbane and Melbourne.

The Internet Freedom Hack is a community event that brings technologists with a passion for digital rights together for a weekend to build things that advance the cause of internet freedom.

Dr Mann will be in conversation with Lauri Love about all the terrible things that governments around the world are doing for internet freedom and privacy, with a focus on the ridiculous #waronmaths in Australia and across the Five Eyes alliance more broadly. They will talk through the options of what we can realistically do about it as scholactivists and hacktivists, and drawing from Love’s recent success fighting extradition and 99 years in a US prison, how to fight back against internet apathy, privacy nihilism and the government.

Lauri Love’s extradition case was one of the cases examined in Dr Mann’s recent co-authored article with Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy on ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ published in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

See attached QUT media release about the event here

You can register to attend the Internet Freedom Hack and the talks here: https://internetfreedomhack.org/

 

 

Event: Cybercrime and Counter Terrorism Panel

The QUT Justice Society and Women in Technology proudly presents: A Professional Panel on Cyber Crime and Counter Terrorism

These societies, who are both passionate about the intersection of technology and the justice system, have come together to provide students a unique opportunity – to discover how cyber crime and counter terrorism works within and influences our justice system. This evening is a great opportunity to listen to amazing professionals and their career journeys in the field. It’s also a fantastic way to network with the professionals and other students and possibly open up more opportunities for yourself!

So if you’re trying to figure out what field of justice works well for you or if you know that cyber crime and/or counter terrorism is what you want to work in and want some more information or if you’re just really interested in the area, then come along for a lovely and very informative evening with us!

Date: Tuesday, 1 May 2018
Time: 5:45pm for a 6pm start
Location: Z1064 Gibson Room, Z Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus
Who: Students of all degrees are more than welcome

Catering will be provided. Please purchase your FREE tickets to assist with catering and dietary requirements.

To purchase FREE tickets click here

CJRC Member gives evidence to Parliamentary Inquiry on law enforcement and new technology



On Thursday the 29th of March Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann gave oral evidence to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement Inquiry into new information communication technologies and the challenges facing law enforcement.

This evidence was based on Dr Mann’s published works in online surveillance, extraterritorial online policing including darkweb policing, biometrics including facial recognition and her ongoing research on 3D printed firearms, big data and algorithmic policing.

The opening statement that Dr Mann gave focused on her public policy and advocacy work in defending encryption and can be accessed here, with the full written submission available here.

QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence in the news

The Sydney Morning Herald ran a story about graduate education about domestic violence in Australia. A new weapon in the fight against family violence by Jane Gilmore was published 20 March 2018. The article features quotes from QUT’s Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence alumni. For more information about the units in the Graduate Certificate in Domestic Violence click here.

QUT School of Justice Biennial Breakfast

QUT School of Justice staff

Facts and figures on family violence initiated conversation at this morning’s QUT School of Justice Biennial Breakfast.

This year’s guest speaker, The Hon. Marcia Neave AO focused on the Queensland Government ‘Not Now, Not Ever’ report and how we can all contribute to prevention of violence, support for victims and children, and holding those who use violence to account.

“Family violence is dramatically underreported and those cases largely focus on physical abuse,” Ms Neave said.

“We don’t have decent figures on things like psychological and technological abuse.”

More than 120 justice and law professionals and academic staff enjoyed a buffet breakfast while they came together to discuss the effect of family violence on society and recent Queensland Court Reform initiatives.

The Hon. Marcia Neave AO has had a varied career as a judge, lawyer, academic and public policy maker, and has held highly regarded positions as former Chair of the Royal Commission into Family Violence and former Judge of the Court of Appeal, Supreme Court of Victoria.

It was these experiences that Ms Neave drew on most during her address, particularly acknowledging the findings of the Royal Commission and the actions undertaken by the Victorian Government since, which can be translated across to the Queensland system.