Co-hosted international conference Southern Criminology, Santa Fe, Argentina

Around 100 scholars from Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Columbia, UK, America, Singapore and Australia met at the international conference on Southern Criminology, co-hosted by the Faculty of Law, QUT and the Faculty of Law, Universidad Nacional del Litorel, Argentina 7-9 November 2018. The papers were simultaneously translated to bridge global divides, enhance inter-lingual dialogue and cross-cultural communication. The event was attended by 13 staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT.

School of Justice, Faculty of Law Staff visit Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires

Aside

On Monday 10 November staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law QUT, visited the Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina (Faculdad de Derecho UBA). Professor Diego Zysman from UBA, who is also an adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Law QUT, met the group from QUT to undertake a private tour of the magnificent building, paintings, sculpture, history and architecture. The faculty has played an important role in the building of Argentina as a democratic nation.13 of the country’s Presidents did their law degree here, as have many of the Judges who tried the military juntas. The most famous Raúl Alfonsín was the first elected president after the fall of the military dictatorship 10 December 1983. This year the university will celebrate 35 years since the return of democracy in Argentina.

 

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Professor Sandra Walklate: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference, Gold Coast, 2019

Professor Sandra Walklate has been confirmed as the first International Guest for the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre 5th Biennial Conference being held on the Gold Coast from 15-17 July 2019.

Sandra Walklate is currently Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool, conjoint Chair of Criminology at Monash University in Melbourne and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Social Justice, QUT. She has been Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2019 becomes President of the British Society of Criminology. She has been researching in the field of criminal victimisation since the early 1980s and her recent publications reflect her ongoing and critical interests in this field, and the capacity of criminology to make sense of the impact of violence in particular on women’s lives.

Professor Walklate joins our Keynote Speaker, Professor Meda Chesney-Lind.

Keep an eye on the conference website for more details about other International Guests and Emerging Australian Scholars.

Click on the following link to submit an abstract: http://crimejusticeconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

 

 

 

 

 

Event: Tuesday 23 October 2018 @ 6pm – A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis


Dear Members and Friends of the AIIA QLD,

IMPORTANT: Please note a venue for this event has not been finalised. Members will be notified as soon as a location is confirmed. We urge members to register as this is a high-profile event on a major issue. Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green is one of the panelists. You will note that the website lists the offices of Holding Redlich Lawyers as the venue. Please disregard this. It will be corrected when the new venue is known

Our next event is scheduled for TUESDAY the 23rd of October 2018, at 6 for 6:30pm. There will be a big turnout for this event. Please register by clicking here:  https://aiiaqld.tidyhq.com/public/schedule/events/21569-a-world-without-privacy-australia-s-role-in-an-international-privacy-crisis

All events are free for AIIA members. Non-members are welcome and can pay $15 (or $10 for student non-members) online while registering. Or they can pay at the door on the night. Drinks are available for purchase at the event, as well as copies of our latest policy commentary (which are free for our members). Details on all events for this month are available on our website and our Facebook page.

A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis

An AIIA Qld Conversations event with Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green, Angus Murray, and Dr Monique Mann

With the rise of social media platforms, digital profiles, transactions and subscriptions, an individuals’ data footprint is constantly expanding. Who owns that data? Is privacy a reality? And is Australian regulation tough enough? Both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights recognise privacy as a fundamental human right. But are these conventions being undermined by a data driven economy and international security concerns. If so, what is the effect of this? Will a loss of privacy equal a loss of autonomy?

With Australia’s privacy legislation under review and consideration, we seek to discuss the effects this will have on the world’s perceptions on Australia’s relationship with privacy. In light of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) setting the ‘golden standard’ on privacy, does Australia continue to lag behind? Join us for a conversation in which we discuss these important questions and more.

About our speakers

Philip Green was appointed to the position of Privacy Commissioner, Office of the Information Commissioner in December 2015. Philip has worked in many different Queensland Government roles and in private practice throughout his career.  Prior to his appointment as Privacy Commissioner, he was Executive Director, Small Business – Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business and the Commonwealth Games and has held this role since 2008.  He was responsible for leading Innovation Policy and Innovation Partnerships and Services and Office of Small Business Teams in the delivery of high level policy development, program management, service delivery and advice. Philip holds degrees in law and arts (with economic minor) and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland and High Court of Australia in February 1992. As the Privacy Commissioner Philip actively promotes and champions privacy rights and responsibilities in Queensland. In his role as Privacy Commissioner, Philip leads the staff in OIC responsible for mediating privacy complaints which have not been resolved with the Queensland Government agency involved; conducting reviews and audits of privacy compliance; giving compliance notices for serious, flagrant or recurring breaches of the privacy principles; and waiving or modifying an agency’s privacy obligations for a particular purpose or project.

Angus Murray is a practising solicitor and human rights advocate. He is a Vice President of the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, the Chair of Electronic Frontiers Australia’s Policy and Research Committee and a Partner and Trade Marks Attorney at Irish Bentley Lawyers. He is also a co-founder and national director of The Legal Forecast and a professional member of Australian Lawyers for Human Rights. He holds a Master of Laws from Stockholm University and his academic work has focused on the interaction between the right to privacy and the enforcement of intellectual property law.

Dr Monique Mann is the Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in Technology and Regulation at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology. She is a member of: The Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre (CJSDRC) at QUT Law; The Intellectual Property and Innovation Law (IPIL) Research Program at QUT Law; The International Law and Global Governance (ILGG) Research Program at QUT Law, and; The Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) at QUT Creative Industries Faculty. Dr Mann is advancing a program of socio-legal research on the intersecting topics of algorithmic justice, police technology, surveillance, and transnational online policing. She is on the Board of Directors of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

 

 

COAG Summit on Reducing Violence against Women

CJSDRC Associate Professor Michael Flood contributed to the opening panel of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Summit on Reducing Violence against Women and their Children. The two-day summit, held over October 2-3 in Adelaide, was an invitation-only event for policy-makers, researchers, advocates, and service providers in the violence sector. The COAG Summit is intended to feed into the development of the fourth and final action plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

In the opening panel, facilitated by Natasha Stott Despoja, Dr Flood provided a stocktake of contemporary efforts in Australia to prevent domestic and sexual violence. He began with a reminder of what ‘primary prevention’ is: changing the social conditions that support and promote violence against women and children, to prevent initial perpetration and victimisation. Prevention is aimed at changing structures, norms, and practices (and is not focused only on attitudes or only on individuals and their behaviours). Flood noted that some prevention strategies are well developed: respectful relationships education in schools (although delivery is very uneven across Australia), communications and social marketing, and comprehensive approaches in some settings such as sports and media. On the other hand, there is in government policy insufficient attention to gender inequalities as drivers of violence against women, and some policies indeed entrench these inequalities. Few efforts are comprehensive (that is, using multiple strategies in multiple settings with multiple audiences). Few efforts involve substantial community engagement. There has been a greater focus on domestic and family violence and a neglect of sexual violence and sexual harassment. Strategies that are under-developed include community development and community mobilisation, respectful relationships education in other contexts such as universities, and work to erode structural gender inequalities.

Associate Professor Michael Flood briefly outlined what is needed in Australian prevention policy. This includes:

* A more defined focus on primary prevention in the Fourth Action Plan;
*  National coordination, whether through a ‘primary prevention hub’ or national coordination body or network.;
*  Sustainability, including sustained funding;
*  Scaling up;
*  Knowledge sharing, through some kind of national clearinghouse or hub;
*  Training and capacity building, to build an expert workforce for prevention;
*  Greater attention to sexual violence and sexual harassment;
*  The active policy promotion of gender equality, including through gender-responsive policies and budgeting;
*  Feminist advocacy, including contributions to, and consultation on, policy and programming;
*  Measures of progress, particularly of efforts to shift the gender inequalities which drive violence against women; and
*  Long term commitment, through a second National Plan.

(Please email Michael Flood if you wish to see a more detailed version of these comments.)

Launch of report on attitudes to gender in Australia

CJSDRC member, Associate Professor Michael Flood spoke at the launch of a new report on attitudes to gender in Australia. The report, From Girls to Men: Social attitudes to gender equality in Australia, involved a national survey of over 2,100 people in Australia aged 16 and over, and was launched at Old Parliament House, Canberra, on September 5.

Author and commentator Clementine Ford facilitated a panel comprising Dr Jessa Rogers (UNE); Associate Professor Michael Flood (QUT); Ashleigh Streeter (COO Jasiri); and Michael Livingstone (Jesuit Social Services). Flood and others at the event noted that while there is widespread awareness among women and men of gender inequalities in Australia, there is also among men in particular a troubling emphasis on how men have been ‘forgotten’ in or excluded from measures to improve gender equality.

Public Lecture: Human Rights in Queensland and Beyond

Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre member and Australian Privacy Foundation Board member Dr Monique Mann organised a large public lecture on the topic of Human Rights in Queensland and Beyond. Professor George Williams AO, Dean and Anthony Mason Professor of Law at the University of NSW, joined the QUT Faculty of Law to deliver a keynote lecture examining a range of issues relating to human rights in Australia and internationally.

This event was co-hosted with a range of community, legal and government partners including: Human Rights Act for Queensland Campaign, Australian Privacy Foundation, Australian Lawyers for Human Rights, Queensland Council for Civil Liberties and Office of the Information Commissioner Queensland.

Professor Williams discussed the current state of human rights (or lack thereof) in Australia, the process and challenges associated with the development, implementation and enforcement of human rights charters, and most importantly, how a Queensland Human Rights Act would affect Queenslanders and Australians more broadly.

Following the lecture, a diverse panel of experts reflected on the importance of a Human Rights Act in their specific domain. The panellists included:

•             Ms Aimee McVeigh, Human Rights for QLD Campaign

•             Mr Shane Duffy, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service QLD

•             Ms Karyn Walsh, Micah Projects

•             Mr Phil Green, QLD Privacy Commissioner

•             Dr Bridget Lewis, QUT Faculty of Law

The event and discussion around this topic is particularly relevant following the Palaszczuk Government’s election commitment in early 2018 to introduce a Human Rights Act in Queensland. It is anticipated that the Palaszczuk Government will release a draft of the Queensland Human Rights Act in the near future.

The lecture attracted over 150 community, government and academic representatives. Philip Green, QLD Privacy Commissioner and panelist, found the discussion highly rewarding and shared his experience of the event: “I believe the discussion will be of tremendous benefit as Queensland embarks on public debate of a draft bill and as Australia debates some very concerning legislative

Mark Wynn: Sexual Assault – Myths and Misconceptions

Mark Wynn: Sexual Assault – Myths and Misconceptions
3 October 10-11 a.m.
in person at CQU Brisbane Campus 160 Ann Street, Brisbane QLD 4000
or live-streamed
Free but registration is required
Fulbright Specialist Mark Wynn is a leading police trainer who has lectured at universities and police academies throughout the world. He draws upon his extensive experience in law enforcement and his knowledge of family violence; stalking; domestic violence and sexual violence. He has also worked a consultant and an advisor to government departments, providing strategies to prevent domestic violence and support in the development of policy and training curriculum for law enforcement.

CSIRO Data61 Live Conference

On Tuesday the 18th of September Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann spoke at the CSIRO Data61Live conference. Data61Live is Australia’s premier science and technology event. More than 2,000 people registered to attend the event from corporates, SMEs and start-ups, universities, government and schools. Dr Mann spoke about some of the different ways forward (i.e. law, regulation, policy, design) for making the most out of big data while protecting privacy and preserving trust in new technologies.

 

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Domestic Violence Beyond the Obvious: Interpreting Power, Control and Manipulation

Fulbright Specialist Mark Wynn

8 October 2018
1 – 5 pm
Room-Three-Sixty, Level 10, Y Block, QUT Gardens Point Campus

Free registration required

Please join the QUT School of Justice for a special domestic violence event with Fulbright specialist Mark Wynn. This interactive training will enable participants to see domestic violence offender manipulation through the eyes of people who have experienced domestic violence, first responders, and advocates. This session will enhance participants’ understanding of the power, control, and manipulation tactics used by abusers, touching on probable cause, interpretation of injuries, justifiable self-defense and determining the dominant/primary aggressor.

The Fulbright Specialist Program supports Australian educational institutions through grants to bring U.S. Specialists in selected disciplines to Australia. The aim of the FSP grant is to assist Australian educational institutions to exchange expertise and build collaborative linkages with U.S. faculty and professionals on curriculum and faculty development, institutional planning and a variety of other activities.

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