‘Examining Stakeholder Perceptions of Community Policing in the Pacific: A Pilot Study on Community Policing in Tuvalu’ presented by Dr. Danielle Watson

Research Seminar
 
Topic: ‘Examining Stakeholder Perceptions of Community Policing in the Pacific: A Pilot Study on Community Policing in Tuvalu’ presented by Dr. Danielle Watson

Please join members of the Crime and Justice Research Centre for the first in the seminar series for 2018.

Date:         Tuesday 23 January 2018
When:       4.00pm – 5.30pm
Venue:      C Block, Level 4, Room C412,
QUT Gardens Point Campus,
2 George Street, Brisbane

Register:  by Thursday 18 January 2018
by accepting the calendar invitation or emailing law.research@qut.edu.au

Abstract:
Recent dialogue about police capacity building in the Pacific region highlights the necessity of adapting and formulating context specific initiatives geared towards advancing jurisdictional agendas. What these discussions vaguely acknowledge is the uniqueness of member countries within the region with specific capacity building requirements and the need for development initiatives to match contextual challenges. Development initiatives should reflect consideration of police organizations role as the most visible arm of the state with responsibility for maintaining law and order, from a standpoint of promoting efficiency and effectiveness. Critical to Pacific police organizations capacity to execute the state mandate is the ability of officers to demonstrate the highest levels of accuracy and efficiency in conducting professional practice. My argument is that continued review of what is considered professional practice and examination of customer satisfaction with the service provided by police are of paramount importance to meeting the police mandate of maintaining law and order at the societal level.
The Tuvalu Police Service (TPS) has expressed its commitment to providing more service oriented policing underscored by professional codes of conduct, behaviors and performance. What presents a difficulty for the police organization, however, is the lack of capacity to drive, evaluate and strategically revise changes, and the inability to derive informed responses to societal stakeholder expectations. The organization therefore relies on donor aid countries to provide required assistance. Most recently, the University of the South Pacific was approached to assist with the collection and analysis of data to inform the TPS’s strategic planning and crime prevention model. The study is a subset of that initiative intended to provide assistance to the TPS by firstly, creating a model for assessing primary stakeholders (police and public) perceptions of and satisfaction with the provision of community policing services; secondly, conduct a comparative analysis of stakeholder perceptions and finally, offer recommendations for continued professional development of police officers in the area of community policing and propose an actionable direction for improved community policing based on the identified stakeholders’ positions. Danielle’s goal is to add to the ongoing dialogue about community policing initiatives in the Pacific and provide necessary data for continued reflection and revision of policing practices in developing Pacific islands.

Danielle is the coordinator of the Pacific Policing Programme at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. She conducts research on police/civilian relations on the margins with particular interests in hotspot policing, police recruitment and training as well as many other areas specific to policing in developing country contexts. Her research interests are multidisciplinary in scope as she also conducts research geared towards the advancement of tertiary teaching and learning. She is the principal researcher on two ongoing projects “Policing Pacific Island Communities” and “Re-Imagining Graduate Supervision at Regional Universities”. She is also the lead author (with Erik Blair) of Reimagining Graduate Supervision in Developing Contexts: A Focus on Regional Universities (2018, Taylor and Francis), and sole author of a forthcoming Pivot Police and the Policed: Language and Power Relations on the Margins of the Global South (2018, Palgrave Macmillan)

 

 

10th ACS conference

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

10th ACS conference – Call for abstract

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

 

VC Excellence Awards for Law and Justice Staff

Today the VC Awards for Excellence were presented by the Dean, Professor John Humphrey for staff in the Faculty Award. The winners, photographed above, included an award for Alison McIntosh, in recognition of her outstanding management as Journal Editor of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.

Dr Matthew Ball, Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, was presented with two awards, one for Excellence in Research and the other for Excellence in Teaching.

Professor John Scott, Dr Bridget Harris and Robyn Johnston were presented with a VC Excellence Award for their organistion of the International Conference, on Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South, which was a tremendous success.

 

 

#CJRC staff and adjuncts win awards at the American Society of Criminology

Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, from the CJRC, and her two co-authors Professors Walter Dekeseredy and Marty Schwartz were awarded the best book prize by the Victimology Division of the American Society of Criminology , 2017.

In another prize ceremony Professor Rob White from University of Tasmania, and adjunct professor with the CJRC, QUT won the Lifetime Achievement Award, Division of Critical Criminology, ASC, 2017. Rob was also recognised for his global contribution to criminology, by the International Division of the ASC.

Professor Marty Schwartz with Professor Rob White

ASSA grant success: ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ Workshop 2018

CJRC staff – Dr Bridget Harris and Professor Kerry Carrington, with Dr Delanie Woodlock and the Honourable Marcia Neave – have received funding from the Academy of Social Sciences Australia to host a workshop in August 2018, on ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ #DVTech18 #DVTech18QUT

Domestic violence is widely recognised as one of Australia’s most important social issues, with approximately one woman killed by her partner, weekly. This event will bring focus to an emerging trend in domestic violence: the use of technology to stalk and abuse victim/survivors. Landmark studies have been conducted in Australia that have highlighted the significant impacts on wellbeing and risks to safety associated with this violence, but as yet there is no consensus in regards to the definitions, effects, legal and judicial remedies and social responses. By bringing together 20 leading scholars, practitioners and technology experts from across the nation, this workshop will produce knowledge that will improve policy and practice in protecting and empowering victims, with the ultimate aim of preventing this under-recognised violence from occurring.

The workshop will also be supported by the Crime and Justice Research Centre and will be held in August 2018; for more on the event, outcomes and research conducted by QUT scholars in this field, contact Bridget.Harris@qut.edu.au

Call for papers – Southern Criminology Workshop, Argentina  7-9 Nov 2018

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Southern Criminology Workshop 7-9 N0VEMBER 2018
SANTA FE, ARGENTINA
Co-Hosted by the Faculty of Social and Juridical Sciences, National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina and the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Academic knowledge about crime, law and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape –particularly, the English speaking world. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to reproduce concepts and arguments developed there to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking.
This three day workshop set in the ideal location of Santa Fe, Argentina brings together scholars from across the globe to contribute to this task of de-colonising knowledge about crime, law and justice. The workshop aims to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges.

The workshop will be convened in three languages; Portuguese, Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, an open access journal.

Abstracts of 250 words are invited in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
Abstracts Due: 31 May 2018
Early submission of abstracts is advised as the workshop will be limited to 100.
Email to: delitoysociedad@unl.edu.ar

 

Crime and Justice Research Centre staff headed to American Society of Criminology conference

Crime and Justice Research Centre staff members are headed to American Society of Criminology conference in Philadelphia, PA 14-18 November 2017. Read more

Attacks on Encryption – Event Report

Prof. Reece Walter with speakers

Belinda Carpenter opening the event

On Thursday the 5th of October the Crime and Justice Research Centre, in collaboration with civil society groups the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch Australia and FutureWise, and industry partner ThoughtWorks, hosted an event on ‘Attacks on Encryption.’ This in response to the Australian Government’s intention to pursue new and increased powers to access encrypted communications via s’backdoors.’

A panel of encryption experts, international privacy law experts, politicians, digital rights advocates, and journalists examined the social and technical consequences of the proposed new ‘backdooring’ powers. They argued these powers are unnecessary and should be highly concerning for Australians who, unlike other western democracies, do not have a constitutional right to privacy.

Presentations from the night are available at the following links:
Surveillance politics
Former Senator Mr Scott Ludlam
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ

Legal dimensions of the global #waronmaths
Angela Daly, Digital Rights Watch Australia and QUT Law
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=21m35s

Government attacks on encryption and civil society coalition campaigns
Justin Clacherty, Redfish Group, Australian Privacy Foundation, and Future Wise
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=36m15s

Breaking Encryption for Dummies
Robin Doherty, ThoughtWorks and Hack for Privacy and Eru Penkman, ThoughtWorks and brisSafety
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=58m50s
Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1izSTqTmO3Gl79KrliUoeBoFi44NceL4pSIbY8yl-Ur0/edit?usp=sharing

Encryption for journalists
Felix Münch, PhD Candidate QUT Digital Media Research Centre
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h22m
Slides: https://flxvctr.github.io/encrypt_all_the_things_primer/

The contested moral legitimacy of encryption ‘backdoors’
Michael Wilson, QUT Justice PhD Candidate
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h40m44s

Discussant
Phil Green, QLD Privacy Commissioner
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h51m24s

Q&A Panel
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h58m32s

Further information about the event can be found at this link:

https://www.attacks-on-encryption.com/

Webinar- Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Join CJRC Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz, CJRC Adjunct Professor Walter DeKeseredy and Professor Martin Schwartz for an international webinar

Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence Against Women, a conversation with the authors

Read more