ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship Mentoring Scheme

Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Members Drs Erin O’Brien, Helen Berents and Monique Mann have been selected for the ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship Mentoring Scheme at the University of Melbourne. This scheme is fully funded by the Australian Research Council and is a part of Professor Joy Damousi’s ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship. The scheme targets outstanding early career female researchers to complete an intensive mentoring programme with a focus on research leadership and enhancing career progression.

Further information about the scheme can be found here.

Research: Study of Women’s Police Stations in Argentina

Kerry pictured with Superintendent Mabel Christina Rojas, Ministry of Security, Buenos Aries, Argentina (Photo taken by Dr Diego Zysman, a Senior Researcher on the Project)

 

Professor Kerry Carrington was awarded an ARC Discovery Grant (2018-2020) to study the prevention of gendered violence. As part of that study she will be studying the preventative impact of Women’s Police Stations in Argentina with Partner Investigator – Professor Máximo Sozzo Universidad Nacional de Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina. The Buenos Aries province of Argentina has 138 Women’s Police Stations that employ over 2300 personnel.

Little is known in the English speaking academy about how societies in the global south have approached the prevention of gendered violence. Brazil was the first country in Latin America to establish women’s only police stations in 1985.  Since then, women’s police stations have been established in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, and Uruguay, and more recently in Sierra Leone, India, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Liberia, the Philippines, South Africa and Uganda. A 2011 United Nations Women evaluation found that women only police stations in Latin America enhanced women’s access to justice and their willingness to report, increased the likelihood of conviction, and enlarged access to a range of other services such as counselling, health, legal, financial and social support. Of those surveyed for the evaluation, 77% in Brazil, 77% in Nicaragua, 64% in Ecuador and 57% in Peru felt that women only police stations had reduced violence against women in their countries (Jubb et al 2010).  Women’s only police stations emerged historically at a time of re-democratisation in Latin America. They were designed to enhance women’s confidence in the criminal justice system, encourage reporting, prevent re-victimization, and send a message to the community that gendered violence was no longer tolerated and men who abuse women will be made accountable.

A more recent study of WPS in Brazil used female homicides as a proxy measure for assessing their effectiveness. They compared 2074 municipalities from 2004 to 2009 and found that ‘women’s police stations appear to be highly effective among young women living in metropolitan areas’ . The  homicide rate dropped by 17 per cent for all women, but for women aged 15-24 in metropolitan areas the reduction was 50 per cent (or 5.57 deaths reduction per 100,000) (Perova and Reynolds 2017: 193-194).

Kerry now has all the approvals necessary to conduct the research and will commence in July this year.

You can listen to a broadcast about the research project aired Friday afternoon 27 April 2018 on the Multicultural Show – Community Radio Interview 4EB  by clicking the link below.

http://www.4eb.org.au/node/41

VC Excellence Awards for Law and Justice Staff

Today the VC Awards for Excellence were presented by the Dean, Professor John Humphrey for staff in the Faculty Award. The winners, photographed above, included an award for Alison McIntosh, in recognition of her outstanding management as Journal Editor of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.

Dr Matthew Ball, Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, was presented with two awards, one for Excellence in Research and the other for Excellence in Teaching.

Professor John Scott, Dr Bridget Harris and Robyn Johnston were presented with a VC Excellence Award for their organistion of the International Conference, on Crime and Justice in Asia and the Global South, which was a tremendous success.

 

 

Discovery and DECRA success for the Crime and Justice Research Centre

We are delighted to announce the following successful ARC DECRA and DISCOVERY  successes.

Dr Angela Higginson has been awarded a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) entitled,  Ethnically Motivated Youth Hate Crime in Australia

Total Funding Amount: $344,996 over three years
 
Proposal Summary:
This project aims to provide the first assessment of youth hate crime in Australia, examine incidence rates over time, and explore how Australia’s experiences compare internationally. Hate crime can cause injury, psychological harm and social disengagement. For victims in early adolescence – a critical time of identity formation – the harms may be multiplied. The project will uncover the risk and protective factors for perpetration and victimisation, and for understanding the consequences for hate crime victims. This is expected to benefit the community by helping to inform social policy to improve the lives of Australia’s youth.

Out of 197 successful DECRA, only 2 were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Professor Kerry Carrington is the successful recipient of a Discovery grant entitled, Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south

Total Funding Amount: $228,951 over three years

Projects Summary:
Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south. This project aims to study the establishment of police stations for women in Argentina as a key element to preventing gendered violence. This project aims to discover the extent to which the Argentinian interventions prevent the occurrence of gendered violence, and identify aspects that could inform the development of new approaches to preventing gendered violence in Australia. Anticipated outcomes include knowledge critical to developing and implementing new ways to prevent gendered violence, with long-term benefits for national health, wellbeing and productivity.

Out of 594 successful Discovery Projects, only four were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Congratulations to PhD candidate Rosalie Gillett – 2nd place QUT Grand Final – Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

Three minute Thesis grand final

 

Three minute Thesis grand final

Congratulations to School of Justice PhD candidate, Rosalie Gillett, on being awarded 2nd place in the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) university-wide QUT Grand Final.

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an annual research communication competition where active professional doctorate and PhD candidates have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis topic and its significance.

After being awarded first place in the Faculty of Law round of 3MT, Rosalie progressed to the university-wide competition, which was held on 6 September 2017.

Rosalie’s research seeks to better understand women’s experiences of harassment and abuse on the dating app Tinder. She is interested in less overt forms of gendered harassment and abuse, what she terms unwanted interactions, which the app may facilitate. She argues that a ‘boys will be boys’ attitude positions men’s inappropriate behaviour as typical and normal. However, her research seeks to highlight how unwanted interactions on Tinder can have cumulative effects that are as important to study as physical violence.

A blog post recently published about Rosalie’s research can be found here:

https://digitalsocialcontract.net/the-games-called-barbie-i-ll-be-ken-and-you-be-the-box-i-come-in-576341c7ed62

Congratulations Rosalie!