The Final Report of ARC Field Research on Women’s Police Stations, Buenos Aires, Argentina is now published in English and Spanish

The Final Report of ARC Field Research on Women’s Police Stations, Buenos Aires, Argentina is now published in English and Spanish, and free to download from the project page

Summary of the Report
Women’s Police Stations are unique innovations that emerged from nations of the Global South in the second half of the 20th century to address violence against women. This report presents the results of a world first study of the unique way these stations called Comisaría de la Mujer (CMF) prevent gender-based violence in the Province of Buenos Aires Argentina. In Spanish and Portuguese these stations are called Police Stations for Women, for the sake of ease in this article we call them Women’s Police Stations. Little is currently known about how this distinctive multi-disciplinary model of policing (that includes social workers, lawyers, psychologists and police) prevents gender violence.
First, we outline the background to the emergence of Women’s Police Stations in the societies of the Global South designed explicitly to respond to and prevent gender-based violence. These stations are distinguished from the women only police units that existed in most parts of the Global North that restricted women in law enforcement to caring for women and children in custody (Cartron 2015, 9). The main substance of the report presents the results of our empirical study on the role of Women’s Police Stations in responding to and preventing gender violence in the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The province established its first women’s police station in 1988 and now has 128. They account for one in five of all police stations in the province and since 2009 have had a legislated mandate to prevent gender violence which distinguishes them from other Women’s Police Stations. We interviewed 100 employees from ten of these unique multi-disciplinary stations.
The final section critically reflects on the virtues and limits of Women’s Police Stations as a model for addressing and preventing gender-based violence. The report compares traditional policing versus specialist policing approaches to the prevention of gender-based violence. While not without limitations, we conclude that specialised Women’s Police Stations in the societies of the Global South widen access to justice, empower women to break the cycle of domestic violence, and engage in a form of community policing that challenges the social norms that sustain gender violence. As a by-product they also provide a career in law enforcement for police (male and female) who specialise in responding to gender violence. The study is framed by Southern Criminology which reverses the notion that ideas, policies and theories can only travel from the Global North to the Global South. The study is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and includes a multi-country team of researchers whose contributions we gratefully acknowledge.

Citation

English

Carrington, K. Sozzo, M. Puyol, M. V. Gamboa, M. Guala, N. Ghiberto, L. Zysman, D. (2019) The Role of Women’s Police Stations in Responding to and Preventing Gender Violence: Buenos Aires, Argentina: Final Report of Field Research. QUT Centre for Justice: Brisbane. Research Report Series 1.

Spanish
Carrington, Kerry , Sozzo, Maximo , Puyol, Maria Victoria , Gamboa, Marcela , Guala, Natacha , Ghiberto, Luciana , & Zysman, Diego (2019) El rol de las Comisarías de la Mujer en la prevención y el abordaje de la violencia de género, Buenos Aires, Argentina: Informe final de trabajo de campo. QUT Centre for Justice: Brisbane. Research Report Series 1.

For more information about the ARC project click here

2nd International Congress on Southern Criminology: Conflict, Power and Justice, Bogotá, Colombia

QUT Centre for Justice co-hosted the 2nd International Congress on Southern Criminology: Conflict, Power and Justice, Bogotá, Colombia, November 6-9 2019.

The event was attended by around 150 delegates from around the world. The majority of participants came from across Latin America, but also participants from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, University of Essex, University of Northumbria and University of Leicester, UK;  the University of Oslo, Norway and of course QUT Centre for Justice.

Papers were grouped into the following themes: Indigenous Knowledges and Southern Criminology; Gender Violence and Southern Criminology; Punishment and Southern Criminology and Eco-Crimes and Southern Criminology.

Academic knowledge about conflict, power and justice has traditionally come from a select number of countries belonging to the Global North; whose magazines, conferences, editors and universities exercise dominion over the global intellectual landscape. In recent decades, substantial efforts have been made to mitigate these colonized ways of generating new knowledge in the area. This three-day congress held in Colombia sought to contribute to the task of democratizing and building a knowledge of the South.

The first International congress on southern criminology, took place in November 2018 at the National University of the Litoral (Argentina). This second congress was co-hosted jointly between it and the Queensland University of Technology, Australia; the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); the Catholic University of Colombia; the University of Essex (United Kingdom); the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Argentina); the University of Northumbria (United Kingdom) and the University of Oslo (Norway).

The event had simultaneous translations. Selected articles will be published in a special edition of the journal Critical Criminology. 

QUT Workshop: Gender Violence and the Global South

The QUT Centre for Justice co-hosted a two day workshop on Gender Violence and the Global South on 2-3 November in the beautiful surroundings of the Botanic Gardens Café.

The workshop heard from leading scholars on gender violence from Brasil, Victoria, NSW, Qld, Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and PNG. Outcomes include plans to edit a special edition of the Journal, a Handbook on Feminism and Gender Violence in the Global South, a co-hosted conference in Port Alegre, Brasil, November 2020; an international network, and international reading group. Key note speakers included Carmen Hein de Campos, Soraia Mendes, Camila Magalhaes, and Thiago Peirobom from Brasil, Heather Nancarrow, CEO of ANROWS; Professor Heather Douglas, Law UQ; and Rowena Maguire, QUT Law

 

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Conflict, Power and Justice in the Global South -International congress on southern criminology Bogotá, Colombia, 6-8 November 2019

Conflict, Power and Justice in the Global South:  2nd International congress on southern criminology

Bogotá, Colombia, 6-8 November 2019

Academic knowledge about conflict, power and justice has traditionally come from a select number of countries belonging to the Global North; whose magazines, conferences, editors and universities exercise dominion over the global intellectual landscape. In recent decades, substantial efforts have been made to mitigate these colonized ways of generating new knowledge in the area.
This three-day congress held in Colombia, invites academics, activists and professionals; who throughout the globe have sought to contribute to the task of democratizing and building a knowledge of the South.

The objective is to connect activists, academics and professionals from north and south; within a collective global project aimed at the creation of innovative and critical global knowledge. The idea emerged from the International congress on southern criminology, which took place in November 2018 at the National University of the Litoral (Argentina), conducted jointly between it and the Technological University of Queensland Australia; the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); the Catholic University of Colombia; the University of Essex (United Kingdom); the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Argentina); the University of Northumbria (United Kingdom) and the University of Oslo (Norway).

The event will have simultaneous translations of selected sessions. Selected articles will be published in a special edition of the journal Critical Criminology.
Summary of 250 words to be sent in English, until: July 31, 2019 to the email:

justice@qut.edu.au

For more information click the conference website

Professor John Byrne Joins the School of Justice as an Adjunct Professor

QUT School of Justice is delighted to welcome Adjunct Professor John Byrne LFPIA LFRAIA as part of our commitment to integrative approaches to crime prevention and informed legal decision-making.

With a distinguished career in public and private sectors that includes authoring the Queensland Government’s guidelines on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), adopted by state and local government agencies, John utilises his extensive expertise in urban design, city development and planning matters as an advisor to governments, developers and the community.

Having directed the design and negotiation of multiple Award-winning developments, John is particularly skilled at applying best practice principles in effective design and planning to deliver on the human-centred purposes of planning legislation.

In a domain built on clear principles that still leaves much room for interpretation, John offers clarity about national and international best practice and how this can be delivered in a constructive, commercial and community-oriented way.

Most recently, John has extended his expertise and advice to include insights from neuroscience about the core needs of humans and how this will shape societal expectations and obligations of governments, developers and other decision-makers involved in the design and management of cities and public spaces.

John has long held an Adjunct Professorship in QUT’s Architecture and Urban Design programs and the role now in the two Faculties reflects his passion for combining and balancing the priorities of different city-making disciplines in integrated urban outcomes.

New Editorial Board International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy

Welcome to the New Editorial Board International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy

This is the 7th year of publication of the International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy, which is committed to democratising knowledge through free to publish and free to download Open Access. We welcome our readers, reviewers, and International Editorial Board Members to another year of open access high quality publication. The demand to publish in our journal has grown exponentially over the last few years. We now receive a submission almost every day and so are very greatful to our reviewers. Our downloads are now over 100,000 per annum.

This year we welcome Associate Professor Matthew Ball as our new Assistant Editor and Dr Michael Chataway as our new Book Review Editor.

We thank Dr Kelly Richards for her contribution as Assistant Editor and Dr Bridget Harris for her contribution as Book Review Editor.

We look forward to working with you again this year.

Kerry Carrington and John Scott

Co Chief Editors

 

Co-hosted international conference Southern Criminology, Santa Fe, Argentina

Around 100 scholars from Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Columbia, UK, America, Singapore and Australia met at the international conference on Southern Criminology, co-hosted by the Faculty of Law, QUT and the Faculty of Law, Universidad Nacional del Litorel, Argentina 7-9 November 2018. The papers were simultaneously translated to bridge global divides, enhance inter-lingual dialogue and cross-cultural communication. The event was attended by 13 staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT.

School of Justice, Faculty of Law Staff visit Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires

Aside

On Monday 10 November staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law QUT, visited the Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina (Faculdad de Derecho UBA). Professor Diego Zysman from UBA, who is also an adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Law QUT, met the group from QUT to undertake a private tour of the magnificent building, paintings, sculpture, history and architecture. The faculty has played an important role in the building of Argentina as a democratic nation.13 of the country’s Presidents did their law degree here, as have many of the Judges who tried the military juntas. The most famous Raúl Alfonsín was the first elected president after the fall of the military dictatorship 10 December 1983. This year the university will celebrate 35 years since the return of democracy in Argentina.

 

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Professor John Scott elected Vice-President #Asian #Criminological Society

Professor John Scott has been elected one of three Vice-President’s for the Asian Society of Criminology 2019-2021. Wai Ting Cheung ü R. Thilagaraj were elected the two other Vice-Presidents. Professor Setsuo Miyazawa from Japan was elected the President. Congratulations all and wishing you all the best for the Annual conference of the Asian Criminological Society in Malaysia this week.