QUT School of Justice Biennial Breakfast

QUT School of Justice staff

Facts and figures on family violence initiated conversation at this morning’s QUT School of Justice Biennial Breakfast.

This year’s guest speaker, The Hon. Marcia Neave AO focused on the Queensland Government ‘Not Now, Not Ever’ report and how we can all contribute to prevention of violence, support for victims and children, and holding those who use violence to account.

“Family violence is dramatically underreported and those cases largely focus on physical abuse,” Ms Neave said.

“We don’t have decent figures on things like psychological and technological abuse.”

More than 120 justice and law professionals and academic staff enjoyed a buffet breakfast while they came together to discuss the effect of family violence on society and recent Queensland Court Reform initiatives.

The Hon. Marcia Neave AO has had a varied career as a judge, lawyer, academic and public policy maker, and has held highly regarded positions as former Chair of the Royal Commission into Family Violence and former Judge of the Court of Appeal, Supreme Court of Victoria.

It was these experiences that Ms Neave drew on most during her address, particularly acknowledging the findings of the Royal Commission and the actions undertaken by the Victorian Government since, which can be translated across to the Queensland system.



Research Showcase – Queensland Police Service

On the 8th March the Crime and Justice Research Centre was invite to deliver a Research Showcase at Queensland Police Service. The event, hosted by Frontline Research and information, Organisational Capability Command at QPS and facilitated by our QUT Police Fellow, Inspector Chris Emzin.

Four CJRC members: Professor Kerry Carrington, Dr Cassandra Cross, Dr Claire Ferguson and Associate Professor Mark Lauchs presented their work to the QPS cohort, to highlight and share work conducted at QUT.

Professor Carrington discussed the policing of gendered violence in the Global South, focusing on the innovative approach of women’s only police stations in Latin America and possible applications in the Australian context. Her ARC Discovery project with Professor Maximo Sozzo will explore the prevention of gendered violence; lessons from the Global South.

Dr Cross reflected on her work with online fraud which she began while working for the Queensland Police Service, and her Churchill Fellowship which extends this work and the challenges police and victims face when responding to fraud. She also outlined her current projects and future research directions in the field of cybercrime, digital crime, fraud and romance fraud.

Dr Ferguson spoke on her fascinating research and consultancy in the field of forensic criminology, offender evidence manipulation at homicide scenes, how police can combat these efforts and processes of determining death in complex cases. She outlined her research in Australian jurisdictions and beyond, on strategies offenders use and features police can use to combat these efforts.

Associate Professor Mark Lauchs’s presentation covered his work on organised crime and outlaw motorcycle groups. He summarised strategies researching these fields in Australia, with limited data in the public domain; how to redress knowledge gaps and explore the ‘organised’ component of crime as well as impacts on the community.

Thank you to the team and to Chris for facilitating what was, we hope, the first of a series of research events with Queensland Police. We look forward to exploring future research collaborations and initiatives with QPS.


Publication: The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting

Crime and Justice Research Centre member Dr Monique Mann, along with Deakin University colleagues Dr Ian Warren and Ms Sally Kennedy, recently published ‘The legal geographies of transnational cyber-prosecutions: Extradition, human rights and forum shifting’ in the leading international (Q1) journal Global Crime.

The article describes legal and human rights issues in three cases of transnational online offending involving extradition requests by the United States (US). These cases were selected as all suspects claimed the negative impacts of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were sufficient to deny extradition on human rights grounds. The authors demonstrate how recent developments in UK and Irish extradition law raise human rights and prosecutorial challenges specific to online offending that are not met by established protections under domestic and internationally sanctioned approaches to extradition, or human rights, law. In these cases, although the allegedly unlawful conduct occurred exclusively online and concurrent jurisdiction enables prosecution at both the source and location of harm, the authors demonstrate why national courts hearing extradition challenges are extremely reluctant to shift the trial forum. They conclude by discussing the implications of the new geographies of online offending for future criminological research and transnational criminal justice.

Keywords: Extradition, computer hacking, legal geography, human rights, autism spectrum disorders, Asperger’s syndrome.

The article can be accessed at this link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17440572.2018.1448272?journalCode=fglc20&

Professor John Scott keynote at Indian National Justice Conference

Professor Scott is presented with gifts by Professor Sibnath Deb, Dean of Law, Pondicherry University.

Professor Scott is presented with gifts by Professor Sibnath Deb, Dean of Law, Pondicherry University.

Professor John Scott has recently returned from Puducherry (a part of French India until 1954), India where he presented a keynote conference paper on the theme of ‘Southern criminology and cognitive justice’.  The two day conference, organized by the School of Law, Pondicherry University (A Central University), examined The Role of Law Enforcement Authorities and Government in Upholding Justice. Distinguished presenters at the national conference included Justice N. Santosh Hegde (Former Judge, Supreme Court of India), Justice Indira Banerjee (Chief Justice of Madras High Court, Chennai), Justice Ravi R. Tripathi (Law Commission, Government of India) and Mr. V. Narayanswamy (Chief Minister, Puducherry Union Territory).  Scott made the case for a globally inclusive criminology noting that Australian, US and British textbooks ignored crime in the Subcontinent. This was especially striking in the case of Australia and Britain given the shared legal, social and political history. He argued that the extent of neglect exposed a bias in the way in which criminological knowledge was produced and disseminated and discussed the historic development of criminology in India and its growth over the last few decades. Major themes of the conference included access to justice, human rights, the role of police and political corruption. Approximately 200 people attended the conference.


Workshop on backlash and resistance to gender equality

Associate Professor Michael Flood presented on backlash and resistance to community educators and advocates in Melbourne. He was the guest of the Women’s Health Association of Australia’s “Preventing Violence Against Women Community of Practice” on February 20 in Melbourne. His presentation explored the nature of resistance to gender equality and violence prevention initiatives and ways to respond to and minimise such pushback.

This work forms part of an evidence review commissioned by VicHealth (the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation) and co-authored with QUT’s Molly Dragiewicz and UTAS’s Bob Pease. The review will be released by VicHealth on March 20.

Associate Professor Michael Flood contributes to ANROWS public forum and training

Michael Flood at ANROWS Community of Practice Workshop

Michael Flood at Evidence to Action & Action as Evidence Forum

Associate Professor Michael Flood contributed to two Sydney events on violence prevention hosted by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS).

The first event was a forum on violence prevention, Evidence to Action & Action as Evidence, intended to showcase the successes and challenges encountered by local communities working to end violence against women. The event highlighted projects and findings from the Building Safe Communities for Women (BSCW) Grant Projects and the ANROWS Action Research Support Project. A report of findings from associated action research was launched at the forum where 130 participants from communities across Australia gathered for the full day event. Download the report here. Dr Flood spoke on his impact evaluation of the ‘Working Together With Men’ project in Melbourne, and hosted a panel with five speakers on engaging men in preventing violence against women.

Associate Professor Flood also presented a workshop as part of an ANROWS Community of Practice Workshop on February 22. These workshops are for ANROWS staff and ANROWS-supported projects to develop their understandings of and skills in violence prevention. Dr Flood’s three-hour, interactive workshop focused on effective ways to engage men in the prevention of men’s violence against women.

Publication: Gender and Age in the Construction of Male Youth in the European Migration “Crisis”

The following article was recently published by Dr. Helen Berents from QUT School of Justice and member of CJRC, along with colleagues from Monash University and Salvation Army UK.  This article was published in Signs – a leading journal (Q1) for feminist politics.


Displacement is clearly gendered; age also has a strong influence on outcomes and experiences for the displaced, including a significant impact on how they are understood by the public and policy makers. It is important to keep this in mind when considering how children and youth are understood within contexts of conflict and insecurity, how they are affected by these forces, and how they navigate their lives in these contexts, especially in seeking peaceful outcomes. Here we engage with the current so-called European migration crisis as a potential watershed moment in understandings of children and youth as refugees. In particular, we suggest that the public representations of young people in this context can be deeply influenced by stereotypes and assumptions around gender and age that may—intentionally or inadvertently—lead to greater insecurity for people of diverse genders and ages. Likewise, we argue that when considering scholarship, policy, and practice in relation to migration, it is critical to develop and apply a lens that accounts for both gender and age.

A link to the full article can be found here


Publication: Victim Stories and Victim Policy – PhD Student Kara Beavis

Congratulations to QUT School of Justice PhD student Kara Beavis whose  article on Victim stories and victim policy has been published in Sage Criminology’s Crime, Media and Culture International Journal.  The focus of the article is Rosie Batty’s influence on public policy and popular discourse in Australia.

Kara co-authored the article with Professor JaneMaree Maher, Professor Jude McCulloch and Dr. Kate Fitz-Gibbon from Monash University’s Gender Equity and Family Violence Focus Research Unit.

Kara is a Ph.D. student researching political economy and the prevention of intimate partner violence following fifteen years’ experience in senior roles in gender equity and violence against women in government and NGO settings in Australia, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

Most recently, Kara worked for Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS) in Sydney and has worked as a Research Affiliate with Monash University’s Gender and Family Violence Focus Research Program.

Kara is also the Unit Coordinator of Dynamics of Domestic Violence and Guest Lecturer in Theories of Government at QUT School of Justice.

Read the full article here:





Associate Professor Michael Flood features on Radio National Life Matters: Changing Behaviours around Sexual Consent

CJRC member, Associate Professor Michael Flood, spoke with Radio National Life Matters program this morning on the topic of Changing Behaviours around Sexual Consent.

The movement for change generated by #metoo and the allegations of sexual assault at Australian universities has brought sexual consent into sharp focus.

How do we re-educate and change behaviour so both parties are respected and fully agree to what goes on between them sexually?

Researcher on men, masculinities, gender and violence prevention, Associate Professor Michael Flood of QUT and Mary Barry, CEO of Our Watch, who run the online campaign targetted at 12-20 year olds called The Line, discuss consent and offer some solutions.

You can listen to Michael’s interview, and the full story here

New Issue: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

A new issue of International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy has been published today.  With authors from Brazil/Portugal, Croatia, Italy, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia, the journal’s global representation continues.

There are nine articles in this issue book-ended by Sandra Walklate’s “Criminology, Gender and Risk:  The Dilemmas of Northern Theorising for Southern Responses to Intimate Partner Violence”, and Aleksandar Marsavelski and John Braithwaite who provide insights into “The Best Way to Rob a Bank”.  Additionally, Matt Ball has authored one of two terrific book reviews:  Marianna Valverde’s Michel Voucault (2017).

The following articles are free to download and share.

Current Issue

Vol 7 No 1 (2018): International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Published: 2018-03-01


Sandra Walklate


Thiago Pierobom de Avila


Jason Spraitz, Kendra N Bowen, Louisa Strange


Tully O’Neill


Antonio Iudici, Fela Boccato, Elena Faccio


Sophie De’Ath, Catherine Anne Flynn, Melanie Field-Pimm


David Rodríguez Goyes


Ida Nafstad


Aleksandar Marsavelski, John Braithwaite


Book Reviews



View All Issues