10th ACS conference – Call for abstract

Dear ACS Members, Scholars & Practitioners,

You are cordially invited to participate in the 10th Asian Criminological Society Annual Conference. This conference will be held in the City of Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia from 24th to 28th June 2018.

The primary objective of this conference is to bring together scholars, academics and practitioners working in the field, or in related disciplines, to share and exchange their knowledge and experiences. Scholars and practitioners from Asia and all over the world are therefore invited to attend.

We encourage scholars, academicians, and, in particular, practitioners to not only attend but also to present papers. Presentations on a wide range of topics in the area are welcomed, and papers synthesizing theory and practice are especially encouraged.

If you are interested in participating in this conference, please visit our website (https://events.mcpfpg.org/acsc2018/).

Thank you.

Associate Professor Dr. P.Sundramoorthy

Organizing Chairman

10th ACS Annual Conference

email: moorthy@usm.my

The Secretariat of Asian Criminological Society

website: www.acs001.com

email: asiancriminologist@gmail.com

 

ASSA grant success: ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ Workshop 2018

CJRC staff – Dr Bridget Harris and Professor Kerry Carrington, with Dr Delanie Woodlock and the Honourable Marcia Neave – have received funding from the Academy of Social Sciences Australia to host a workshop in August 2018, on ‘Technology and Domestic Violence: Experiences, Perpetration and Responses’ #DVTech18 #DVTech18QUT

Domestic violence is widely recognised as one of Australia’s most important social issues, with approximately one woman killed by her partner, weekly. This event will bring focus to an emerging trend in domestic violence: the use of technology to stalk and abuse victim/survivors. Landmark studies have been conducted in Australia that have highlighted the significant impacts on wellbeing and risks to safety associated with this violence, but as yet there is no consensus in regards to the definitions, effects, legal and judicial remedies and social responses. By bringing together 20 leading scholars, practitioners and technology experts from across the nation, this workshop will produce knowledge that will improve policy and practice in protecting and empowering victims, with the ultimate aim of preventing this under-recognised violence from occurring.

The workshop will also be supported by the Crime and Justice Research Centre and will be held in August 2018; for more on the event, outcomes and research conducted by QUT scholars in this field, contact Bridget.Harris@qut.edu.au

Discovery and DECRA success for the Crime and Justice Research Centre

We are delighted to announce the following successful ARC DECRA and DISCOVERY  successes.

Dr Angela Higginson has been awarded a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) entitled,  Ethnically Motivated Youth Hate Crime in Australia

Total Funding Amount: $344,996 over three years
 
Proposal Summary:
This project aims to provide the first assessment of youth hate crime in Australia, examine incidence rates over time, and explore how Australia’s experiences compare internationally. Hate crime can cause injury, psychological harm and social disengagement. For victims in early adolescence – a critical time of identity formation – the harms may be multiplied. The project will uncover the risk and protective factors for perpetration and victimisation, and for understanding the consequences for hate crime victims. This is expected to benefit the community by helping to inform social policy to improve the lives of Australia’s youth.

Out of 197 successful DECRA, only 2 were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Professor Kerry Carrington is the successful recipient of a Discovery grant entitled, Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south

Total Funding Amount: $228,951 over three years

Projects Summary:
Preventing gendered violence: lessons from the global south. This project aims to study the establishment of police stations for women in Argentina as a key element to preventing gendered violence. This project aims to discover the extent to which the Argentinian interventions prevent the occurrence of gendered violence, and identify aspects that could inform the development of new approaches to preventing gendered violence in Australia. Anticipated outcomes include knowledge critical to developing and implementing new ways to prevent gendered violence, with long-term benefits for national health, wellbeing and productivity.

Out of 594 successful Discovery Projects, only four were awarded in the 1602 Criminology FOR code

Call for papers – Southern Criminology Workshop, Argentina  7-9 Nov 2018

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Southern Criminology Workshop 7-9 N0VEMBER 2018
SANTA FE, ARGENTINA
Co-Hosted by the Faculty of Social and Juridical Sciences, National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina and the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Academic knowledge about crime, law and justice has generally been sourced from a select number of countries from the Global North, whose journals, conferences, publishers and universities dominate the intellectual landscape –particularly, the English speaking world. As a consequence research about these matters in contexts of the Global South have tended to reproduce concepts and arguments developed there to understand local problems and processes. In recent times, there have been substantial efforts to undo this colonized way of thinking.
This three day workshop set in the ideal location of Santa Fe, Argentina brings together scholars from across the globe to contribute to this task of de-colonising knowledge about crime, law and justice. The workshop aims to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project to create globally connected critical and innovative knowledges.

The workshop will be convened in three languages; Portuguese, Spanish and English. Selected papers will be published as a Special Edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, an open access journal.

Abstracts of 250 words are invited in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
Abstracts Due: 31 May 2018
Early submission of abstracts is advised as the workshop will be limited to 100.
Email to: delitoysociedad@unl.edu.ar

 

Invitation – Journal Launch: ‘Limits and Prospects of Criminal Law Reform – Past, Present, Future’

Date: 15 November, 5:30pm Location: UTS Law Building (5B, 3.18)

You are invited to the launch of the special edition of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy on ‘Limits and Prospects of Criminal Law Reform – Past, Present, Future’ (2017, Vol 6, No 3). A number of the authors from this special edition will reflect on developments and obstacles in criminal law reform.

This special edition arose out of the national Criminal Law Workshop hosted at UTS in 2016, it includes the following articles:

See the full version at: https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/index

Please RSVP to Aline Roux at Aline.Roux@uts.edu.au

Attacks on Encryption – Event Report

Prof. Reece Walter with speakers

Belinda Carpenter opening the event

On Thursday the 5th of October the Crime and Justice Research Centre, in collaboration with civil society groups the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch Australia and FutureWise, and industry partner ThoughtWorks, hosted an event on ‘Attacks on Encryption.’ This in response to the Australian Government’s intention to pursue new and increased powers to access encrypted communications via s’backdoors.’

A panel of encryption experts, international privacy law experts, politicians, digital rights advocates, and journalists examined the social and technical consequences of the proposed new ‘backdooring’ powers. They argued these powers are unnecessary and should be highly concerning for Australians who, unlike other western democracies, do not have a constitutional right to privacy.

Presentations from the night are available at the following links:
Surveillance politics
Former Senator Mr Scott Ludlam
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ

Legal dimensions of the global #waronmaths
Angela Daly, Digital Rights Watch Australia and QUT Law
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=21m35s

Government attacks on encryption and civil society coalition campaigns
Justin Clacherty, Redfish Group, Australian Privacy Foundation, and Future Wise
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=36m15s

Breaking Encryption for Dummies
Robin Doherty, ThoughtWorks and Hack for Privacy and Eru Penkman, ThoughtWorks and brisSafety
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=58m50s
Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1izSTqTmO3Gl79KrliUoeBoFi44NceL4pSIbY8yl-Ur0/edit?usp=sharing

Encryption for journalists
Felix Münch, PhD Candidate QUT Digital Media Research Centre
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h22m
Slides: https://flxvctr.github.io/encrypt_all_the_things_primer/

The contested moral legitimacy of encryption ‘backdoors’
Michael Wilson, QUT Justice PhD Candidate
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h40m44s

Discussant
Phil Green, QLD Privacy Commissioner
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h51m24s

Q&A Panel
https://youtu.be/Y-puLRRFohQ?t=1h58m32s

Further information about the event can be found at this link:

https://www.attacks-on-encryption.com/

Event: Attacks on Encryption – Privacy, Civil Society and the Surveillance State

Join the Australian Privacy FoundationDigital Rights Watch AustraliaFuture Wise, and the QUT Crime and Justice Research Centre at ThoughtWorks Brisbane to discuss ‘Attacks on Encryption: Privacy, Civil Society, and the Surveillance State.’

The Australian Government’s intention to pursue new and increased powers to access encrypted communications via statutorily required ‘backdoors’ has been met with wide-ranging privacy and information security concerns.

On 5 October 2017, a panel of encryption experts, international privacy law experts, academics, politicians, digital rights advocates, and journalists will unpack the social and technical consequences of the proposed new ‘backdooring’ powers.

At present, it is unclear if Australia’s laws will require so-called ‘backdoor’ vulnerabilities to be built into messaging applications like Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp. However, if this were to occur, it would enable government access to these services via decryption keys and/or enable remote access to devices for interception of communications “at the ends”. Experts argue that these powers are unnecessary and should be highly concerning for Australians who, unlike other western democracies, do not have a constitutional right to privacy.

This Attacks on Encryption event is relevant to anyone concerned about security and responsible governance and will cover the consequences of engineering ‘backdoors’ into commercially available encryption software, the issues associated with companies being compelled to decrypt user data, and forcing the design of communications tools that allow government interception.

Speakers include:

  • Former Senator Mr Scott Ludlam: Surveillance politics
  • Angela Daly, Digital Rights Watch Australia and QUT Law: Legal dimensions of the global #waronmaths
  • Justin Clacherty, Redfish Group, Australian Privacy Foundation, and Future Wise: Government attacks on encryption and civil society coalition campaigns
  • Robin Doherty, ThoughtWorks and Hack for Privacy and Eru Penkman, ThoughtWorks and brisSafety: Breaking Encryption for Dummies
  • Brenda Moon, QUT Digital Media Research Centre and Felix Münch, PhD Candidate QUT Digital Media Research Centre: Encryption for journalists
  • Michael Wilson, QUT Justice PhD Candidate: The contested moral legitimacy of encryption ‘backdoors’
  • Discussant: Phil Green, QLD Privacy Commissioner

The event will be hosted at ThoughtWorks Brisbane with catering and refreshments provided, but we will also be live streaming and providing remote links via the cyber.

For more information and speaker biographies and abstracts: https://www.attacks-on-encryption.com/

To register: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/attacks-on-encryption-privacy-civil-society-and-the-surveillance-state-tickets-37527225943

Note: The event is currently sold out with a waitlist but in the event that CJRC members register then tickets will be released to them as priority attendees.

For further information contact Dr Monique Mann as event organiser.

Justice Professor joins Queensland Attorney General to detail reforms to youth justice system

John Scott alongside the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath and Minister for Child safety, Shannon Fentiman, at a Press conference on Friday

On the 15 September School of Justice Professor, John Scott, joined the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath and Minister for Child safety, Shannon Fentiman, at a press conference in the Queensland Parliament outlining the  Palaszczuk Government’s timeline for the integration of 17-year-olds into the youth criminal system, to break the cycle of youth offending, reduce remand numbers and create safer communities.

 

Staged transitioning will begin in November 2017, and the Youth Justice and Other Legislation (Inclusion of 17-year-old Persons) Amendment Act will commence on 12 February 2018.

The plan also includes:

  • Supervised Bail Accommodation Services as an option for 14-17 year olds from November 2017
  • Separate zones within Brisbane Youth Detention Centre and Cleveland Youth Detention Centre for 10-13 year olds
  • Recruitment of new frontline staff for courts, community and Youth Detention Centres
  • More resources for courts, including two more magistrates, to ensure timely processes
  • Provision of after-hours legal services to young people and increased funding for Legal Aid Queensland

Mrs D’Ath said about 80% of young people in youth detention in Queensland were on remand, awaiting the outcome of their court matters. Often, this is because there is no suitable accommodation or support services for their release on supervision. The nationwide average for young people on remand is 57%.The plan will provide courts with another bail alternative, reducing their reliance on remand as a solution for youths who have no safe home to go to. Nine sites will provide specialised Bail accommodation centres at Carbrook, Camooweal, Jacobs Well, Mt Isa, Wacol, Logan Reserve and in two existing facilities in Townsville. The majority are in rural or semi-rural areas. Youth justice workers would be based at the Supervised Bail Accommodation and there will also be health, education and other services available.

Professor Scott spoke in support of the measures, but said they may not be initially popular.

“It may not win votes; it’s not an ideological initiative, it’s not a political initiative,” he said.

He said “This is Criminology 101, we need to be careful that young people are integrated back into communities and not isolated or stigmatised.”

He also noted that these initiatives would have positive impacts for rural communities and this was important, especially given rural young people faced additional challenges in terms of lack of resources and justice options.

Congratulations to PhD candidate Rosalie Gillett – 2nd place QUT Grand Final – Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

Three minute Thesis grand final

 

Three minute Thesis grand final

Congratulations to School of Justice PhD candidate, Rosalie Gillett, on being awarded 2nd place in the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) university-wide QUT Grand Final.

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an annual research communication competition where active professional doctorate and PhD candidates have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis topic and its significance.

After being awarded first place in the Faculty of Law round of 3MT, Rosalie progressed to the university-wide competition, which was held on 6 September 2017.

Rosalie’s research seeks to better understand women’s experiences of harassment and abuse on the dating app Tinder. She is interested in less overt forms of gendered harassment and abuse, what she terms unwanted interactions, which the app may facilitate. She argues that a ‘boys will be boys’ attitude positions men’s inappropriate behaviour as typical and normal. However, her research seeks to highlight how unwanted interactions on Tinder can have cumulative effects that are as important to study as physical violence.

A blog post recently published about Rosalie’s research can be found here:

https://digitalsocialcontract.net/the-games-called-barbie-i-ll-be-ken-and-you-be-the-box-i-come-in-576341c7ed62

Congratulations Rosalie!