ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship Mentoring Scheme

Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Members Drs Erin O’Brien, Helen Berents and Monique Mann have been selected for the ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship Mentoring Scheme at the University of Melbourne. This scheme is fully funded by the Australian Research Council and is a part of Professor Joy Damousi’s ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship. The scheme targets outstanding early career female researchers to complete an intensive mentoring programme with a focus on research leadership and enhancing career progression.

Further information about the scheme can be found here.

Congratulations to Dr Papazian

Congratulations to School of Justice PhD graduate Dr Natasha Papazian. Her thesis Transgender domestic violence: An analysis of the transgender community and service provision in Queensland examines domestic violence from the perspectives of transgender people and LGBT-friendly service providers. Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Associate Professor Matthew Ball supervised the project.

Read more

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Editorial Board welcomes 31 new members

Welcome to 31 new members of the International editorial board

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is an open access, blind peer reviewed journal committed to democratising the production and dissemination of knowledge. It has a distinguished International Editorial Board comprised of 104 leading scholars from 25 countries. Last year the journal was ranked for the very first time by SciMago as a Q2 journal with the highest impact factor for Law and Criminology in Australia. This year it has remained a Q2 ranked journal and has the second highest impact factor of any journal published in Australia in law and criminology. This is a remarkable feat for a journal as young as this one in a global system of knowledge that privileges journals published in Europe, United Kingdom and United States. It is continuing to grow in stature and impact. Articles have been downloaded 270,000 times and abstract viewed 353,000 times since its firsts publication in 2012. The journal receives between 4-6 submissions per week from all over the world. As a consequence we have had to grow the international editorial board to meet the increased demand.

The Editors of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy have recently undertaken a global search for scholars whose expertise would fit with the vision of the journal to join the distinguished International Editorial Board. We warmly welcome the new 31 members listed below:

Dr. Jerjes Aguirre Ochoa, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Mexico

Associate Professor Thalia Anthony University of Technology, Sydney

Dr Lynzi Armstrong Wellington University, New Zealand

Professor Matias Bailone, Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aries, Argentina

Professor Rosemary Barberet, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York

Dr Jarrett Blaustien, Monash University, Melbourne

Associate Professor Rebbeca Scott Bray, University of Sydney

Professor Melissa Bull, Griffith University, Brisbane

Professor Vania Ceccato, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweeden

Dr Lennon Chang, Monash University, Melbourne

Professor Bill Dixon, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom

Dr Asher Flynn, Monash University Melbourne

Dr Bianca Fileborn UNSW, Sydney

Dr Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University, Melbourne

Dr David Fonseca Brazil, University of Brazillia, Brazil

Assistant Professor David Goyes, Universidad Antonio Nariño, Colombia

Assistant Professor Kate Henne, University of Waterloo, Canada

Associate Professor Nicola Henry, RMIT, Melbourne

Professor Kristian Lasslett Ulster University, North Ireland

Dr Alyce McGovern, UNSW, Sydney

Professor Julia Monárrez El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

Dr Leon Mossavi, Open University Singapore

Associate Professor Ross McGarry, University of Liverpool, UK

Associate Professor Darren Palmer Deakin University, Geelong

Professor Nathan Pino, Texas State University, US

Associate Professor Julia Quilter University of Wollongong

Professor Richard Sparks, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Associate Professor Max Travers, University of Tasmania

Dr Danielle Watson, University of the South Pacific, Fiji

Professor Alison Young, University of Melbourne, Melbourne

Dr Yuan Xiaoyu, University of Law and Political Science, China

CJSDRC Briefing Paper Series – QLD Police Service

On 25 July 2018 Dr Monique Mann launched the new Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre Briefing Paper series at QLD Police Service (QPS) Headquarters. This event was hosted by the QPS Intelligence and Covert Services Command with representatives of the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, the Australian Federal Police and the QLD Crime and Corruption Commission in attendance.

At this event Dr Monique Mann presented her co-authored work with QUT Law Adjunct Dr Angela Daly on 3D Printing, Policing and Crime. A briefing paper covering this topic is available for free open access download. It provides background information on the intersections of 3D printing technology, policing, and crime. It canvasses the role of 3D printing as a tool, as a source of evidence, and as a potential threat for police agencies and wider public safety. The emergence of 3D printed firearms is considered in depth, and an overview of case studies where 3D firearms or firearm parts have been located and investigated by police are included. Finally, the legal and enforcement models implemented to address 3D printing technology to date in different jurisdictions are reviewed.

CJSDRC presents at 25th World Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA)

Michael Wilson, Dr Erin O’Brien, Michelle Ringrose and Dr Helen Berents at the IPSA 25th World Congress

This week four members of the CJSDRC (Crime Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre) presented at the 25th World Congress of the International Political Science Association (IPSA); joining over 2000 delegates in Brisbane from the 21-25 July. 

 The IPSA World Congress brings together delegates from over the world to discuss diverse and pressing issues facing political institutions and political practices at local, national and international levels. This year’s theme was ‘Borders and Margins’.

 Across four busy days Dr Erin O’Brien, Dr Helen Berents, Michelle Ringrose, and Michael Wilson presented on several exciting research projects they are currently undertaking. Dr Erin O’Brien and PhD Candidate Michael Wilson presented a paper together on “Alternative tweeting: reclaiming institutions from the Trump Presidency” in a session on political participation on the internet. Michelle Ringrose, also a PhD Candidate with the Centre, presented on her ongoing PhD research with a paper titled “Gendered Narratives in Genocidal Crimes: An Analysis of Civil Society Representations of the Yazidi Genocide”.  Dr Helen Berents’ paper, in a session on violence, images and world politics was titled “Violence, Compassion and Spectacle: The Politics of Sharing Images of Suffering Children”

 

Policing in the South Pacific: University of the South Pacific

 

Image 1                                                                  Image 2

Image 1:  John Scott with members of the USP Policing Program, Danielle Watson and Casandra Harry

Image 2:  Vice Chancellor of the University of the South Pacific, Professor Rajesh Chandra

CJRC member and Acting Head of School of Justice at QUT, Professor John Scott, recently visited the University of the South Pacific’s main Fiji campus where he engaged with staff in the School of Social Sciences about a number of ongoing initiatives in the space of southern criminology. In particular, QUT staff, and staff of the Pacific Policing Program, USP, are collaborating on projects  looking at policing in the Pacific, and the ecology of crime in island communities.

The Discipline Coordinator of the USP Policing program, Dr Danielle Watson is an Adjunct with the School of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Recently published: Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms

Molly Dragiewicz, Jean Burgess, Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Michael Salter, Nicolas P. Suzor, Delanie Woodlock & Bridget Harris recently published Technology facilitated coercive control: Domestic violence and the competing roles of digital media platforms. Feminist Media Studies, 18(4), 609–625. https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2018.1447341

This article is part of a special issue of Feminist Media Studies on Online Misogyny, edited by Debbie Ging and Eugenia Siapera. Read more

Publication: Police perceptions of prejudice: how police awareness training influences the capacity of police to assess prejudiced motivated crime

CJRC member, Dr Toby Miles-Johnson has recently published an article in the journal Policing and Society, Volume 28, Issue 6, August 2018.  This is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

ABSTRACT

Prejudice motivated crime (PMC) is defined as crimes motivated by bias, prejudice or hatred towards members of particular groups, communities and individuals. To understand how police awareness training facilitates or constrains the capacity of police officers to appropriately classify and respond to PMC, data were collected from a population of Police Recruits (PRs) and Protective Service Officers (PSOs) (N = 1609) to ascertain their perceptions of PMC pre- and post-PMC awareness training. These were used in a logistic regression model to identify factors explaining whether PRs and PSOs would identify a vignette/scenario as a PMC. We found PRs and PSOs were more likely to correctly identify a PMC scenario than a control scenario, but only 61% as likely to identify an incident as PMC post-PMC awareness training after accounting for other variables. We argue that awareness training programmes need to be more aligned to the specific needs of policing in diverse societies.

The full article can be found here:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2016.1206099

 

Professor John Scott elected Vice-President #Asian #Criminological Society

Professor John Scott has been elected one of three Vice-President’s for the Asian Society of Criminology 2019-2021. Wai Ting Cheung ü R. Thilagaraj were elected the two other Vice-Presidents. Professor Setsuo Miyazawa from Japan was elected the President. Congratulations all and wishing you all the best for the Annual conference of the Asian Criminological Society in Malaysia this week.