Welcome – QUT School of Justice – Dr Caitlin Mollica

We welcome Dr. Caitlin Mollica as a Lecturer within QUT School of Justice, Faculty of Law.  Caitlin completed her PhD at Department of Government and International Relations at Griffith University (2018). Caitlin’s research interests include youth, gender, transitional justice and human rights. Caitlin’s primary research considers the engagement of young people with transitional justice and human rights practices.  Her work also examines the unique ways girls and young women access justice in the Asia Pacific.

Caitlin’s published work examines the contributions of Solomon Islander youth to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission process and highlights the importance of recognising the agency and individual voices of youth as a way to ensure more inclusive and holistic reconciliation practices. Caitlin has been co-investigator on a UN Women-funded research project, that mapped women’s access to formal and informal justice processes in Asia and the Pacific (2019). In 2019, she was awarded a New Researcher Grant from Griffith University to conduct a pilot study for a project on the implementation of UN Resolution 2250 on Youth Peace and Security (2019)Caitlin also secured funding, in collaboration with Dr. Helen Berents (QUT Centre for Justice), from the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia (ASSA) for a workshop on Youth and Peace in the Indo-Pacific (2019).  This workshop brought together scholars and practitioners to consider how policy responses and scholarship can better engage with the peace and security challenges facing young people in the region.

Currently, Caitlin is developing a project that examines the relationship between donors and youth in the broader context of the new international mandate on youth inclusive peace building.

A warm welcome to Caitlin from all of us at QUT Centre for Justice.

 

Welcome – QUT School of Justice – Dr Danielle Watson

We welcome Dr Danielle Watson as a Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, Faculty of Law.   

Danielle was awarded a PhD in Sociolinguistics from the University of the West Indies, St Augustine in 2016.  She was the former coordinator of the Pacific Policing Programme at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. Danielle specializes in police/civilian relations on the margins with particular interests in hotspot policing, police recruitment and training as well as many other areas specific to policing in developing country contexts. Her research interests are multidisciplinary in scope as she also conducts research geared towards the advancement of tertiary teaching and learning.

Danielle is the principal researcher on two ongoing projects “Policing Pacific Island Communities” and “Re-Imagining Graduate Supervision at Regional Universities”. She is also the lead author (with Erik Blair) of Reimagining Graduate Supervision in Developing Contexts: A Focus on Regional Universities (2018, Taylor and Francis), and sole author of Police and the Policed: Language and Power Relations on the Margins of the Global South (2018, Palgrave Macmillan).

Danielle has received several awards and grants to conduct research in Trinidad and Tobago, Germany, Austria, Canada, Australia and Fiji. Among the prestigious awards she received were a Caribbean-Pacific Island Mobility Scheme (CARPIMS) PhD Mobility Scholarship (2014), an Australian Government Endeavour Executive Fellowship (2016) and a British Academy Fellowship (2018).

Danielle is passionate about working with all stakeholders involved in the maintenance of law and order, and hopes to advance policing policies and practices through academic outreach.

Welcome Danielle!

On Friday we will profile our third and final new member to the school.

Welcome – QUT School of Justice – Dr Alissa Macoun

We welcome Dr Alissa Macoun as a Lecturer in the School of Justice, Faculty of Law.

Alissa is interested in the politics of race and contemporary colonialism.  Alissa’s work in Australian Indigenous politics and policy explores ways race is used to legitimise colonial approaches, institutions and regimes. She is interested in policy logics, political structures, academic and social knowledge production practices, as well as the connections between these processes. Her work draws on scholarship from public policy, political theory, settler colonial studies, sociology, critical race and critical Indigenous studies.

Alissa was a Lecturer at the School of Political Science and International Studies at University of Queensland from 2015-2019. Although non-Indigenous, she was a Research Fellow for the Australian Research Council’s National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN) based at QUT from 2013 – 2015.

Alissa has a PhD (Political Studies) and BA (Honours, first class) from the University of Queensland. Her PhD thesis explored the political justification of the Commonwealth’s 2007 Intervention in Northern Territory Indigenous communities and won the 2013 APSA PhD Prize.

We have three new staff who have commenced with QUT School of Justice in 2020 and we will be profiling each of them this week.  Keep an eye out!

New Editor: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

The International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is delighted to welcome new Editor Dr David Rodríguez Goyes. David is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Oslo, Norway; and an associate professor at the Universidad Antonio Nariño, Colombia. He holds a PhD in criminology from the University of Oslo, Norway. He is a lawyer by training, with postgraduate studies in criminal law and a masters in sociology from the Universidad Nacional, Colombia. His main field of research is green criminology, with a focus on biopiracy. His greatest contribution to the field is in the development of a Southern Green Criminology. David was guest editor for the Journal’s 2019 Special Issue Towards Global Green Criminological Dialogues: Voices from the Americas and Europe and is also a member of the Journal’s International Editorial Board.

The Journal Editors would like to thank outgoing Assistant Editor, Associate Professor Matthew Ball for his substantial contributions to the Journal in 2019.

Beware of bushfire scams – Dr Cassandra Cross

The recent Australian bushfires are presenting the latest opportunity for fraud.

QUT C4J member, Dr Cassandra Cross, has written an article for The Conversation about how this fraud can happen, how you can safely donate and how you can think long term about protecting yourself from fraud.

Cass researches on various aspects of fraud including the policing, prevention and support for online fraud, including romance fraud and cybercrime.  In 2011, she was awarded the Donald Mackay Churchill Fellowship, which enabled her to travel to the UK, USA and Canada to examine how these jurisdictions respond to online fraud.

In 2013, Cass was awarded a Criminology Research Grant (CRG) to undertake the first Australian study examining the reporting and support needs of online fraud victims. In 2015, she was awarded a second CRG to examine the process of identity restoration for victims of identity theft, in partnership with iDcare. In 2016, she was awarded a third CRG to examine the policing of cybercrime in Australia.

In 2019 Cass was appointed Senior Research Fellow to the Cybersecurity CRC, delivering industry-led cyber security research outcomes.   

The article is well worth a read – read here     

 

 

 

Fulbright Scholar Award – Associate Professor Kelly Richards

 

Our heartfelt congratulations to Associate Professor Kelly Richards on her recent Fulbright Scholar Award for 2020.

Kelly will use her Fulbright Scholar Award to further her research on victim/survivors of sexual violence and Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA) at California State University-Fresno and the University of Vermont.

Kelly’s research focuses primarily on sexual offending against children, and especially on the reintegration of those who perpetrate sexual violence. In 2010 Kelly was awarded the ACT Government Office for Women Audrey Fagan Churchill Fellowship to investigate CoSA around the globe. Kelly is a member of a wide range of professional and community organisations in the fields of criminology and sexual violence. She is a Member of the Queensland Government’s Child Death Case Review Panels, the Queensland representative on the After Prison Network, a Committee Member of the Queensland chapter of Restorative Practices International, a member of the Brisbane Rape and Incest Survivors’ Support Centre Research and Reference Group, and a member of the Bravehearts Foundation Expert Research Advisory Panel, among others. 

 

 

Vice-Chancellors’s Award for Excellence – Dr Cassandra Cross

Congratulations to Dr Cassandra Cross, member of QUT Centre for Justice, on her recent Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence.  This award is conferred to individuals or teams in recognition of exceptional performance that aligns with the university’s vision and strategic goals.

Cass’ award was based on excellence in Partnerships and Engagement for forging transdisciplinary research partnerships and enhancing engagement within and beyond the QUT community.

Cass has built strong partnerships and engagement in the areas of fraud and cybercrime with SUNCORP, several Australian Police agencies, PCYC Queensland, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and Self-Managed Independent Superannuation Funds Association (SISFA)

Congratulations Cass.

 

 

Workshop: Youth and Peace in the Indo-Pacific: Policy, Practice, Action

Public Panel – 27 November                     Workshop day 2

Helen Berents – Workshop Welcome

On the 28th and 29th of November, QUT Centre for Justice hosted a workshop funded by the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia (ASSA), ‘Youth and Peace in the Indo-Pacific: Policy, Practice, Action’.

The workshop was co-convened by School of Justice Senior Lecturer, Dr Helen Berents, along with Dr Caitlin Mollica (Griffith University) and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia Professor Jacqui True (Monash University).

On Wednesday 27, November there was a public evening panel event including Dr Helen Berents, on ‘Agents of Change: What Can Youth Offer Peace and Security?’ held at the Ship Inn, Southbank.

The workshop on the 28th and 29th brought together invited academics, advocates, and civil society representatives from across Australia to consider how policy responses and scholarship can better engage with the peace and security challenges facing young people in the Indo-Pacific region.

Over half the world’s population is under 30 years old; and almost half of the world’s youth live in the Indo-Pacific. Young people in the region face multiple, intersecting challenges including the impact of conflict and insecurity, economic insecurity, and growing environmental risks. Yet they are often marginalised or excluded from the institutions tasked with implementing peace and security. This workshop aimed to facilitate a critical policy dialogue, which examines post-conflict practices that have sought to meaningfully engage with the experiences of youth in the region.

 The workshop drew on the established work and leadership of feminist scholars and practitioners, which has brought about gender inclusive policy making, and encouraged the development of similar practices for those individuals aged between 18-29 years old. In doing so, it contributed critical scholarship that considers the contributions of youth participation to the creation of more inclusive and holistic peace practices; and Australia’s role in the development of youth mainstreaming policies and practices in conflict-affected contexts.

Further information about the workshop can be found here.

 

 

 

The Final Report of ARC Field Research on Women’s Police Stations, Buenos Aires, Argentina is now published in English and Spanish

The Final Report of ARC Field Research on Women’s Police Stations, Buenos Aires, Argentina is now published in English and Spanish, and free to download from the project page

Summary of the Report
Women’s Police Stations are unique innovations that emerged from nations of the Global South in the second half of the 20th century to address violence against women. This report presents the results of a world first study of the unique way these stations called Comisaría de la Mujer (CMF) prevent gender-based violence in the Province of Buenos Aires Argentina. In Spanish and Portuguese these stations are called Police Stations for Women, for the sake of ease in this article we call them Women’s Police Stations. Little is currently known about how this distinctive multi-disciplinary model of policing (that includes social workers, lawyers, psychologists and police) prevents gender violence.
First, we outline the background to the emergence of Women’s Police Stations in the societies of the Global South designed explicitly to respond to and prevent gender-based violence. These stations are distinguished from the women only police units that existed in most parts of the Global North that restricted women in law enforcement to caring for women and children in custody (Cartron 2015, 9). The main substance of the report presents the results of our empirical study on the role of Women’s Police Stations in responding to and preventing gender violence in the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The province established its first women’s police station in 1988 and now has 128. They account for one in five of all police stations in the province and since 2009 have had a legislated mandate to prevent gender violence which distinguishes them from other Women’s Police Stations. We interviewed 100 employees from ten of these unique multi-disciplinary stations.
The final section critically reflects on the virtues and limits of Women’s Police Stations as a model for addressing and preventing gender-based violence. The report compares traditional policing versus specialist policing approaches to the prevention of gender-based violence. While not without limitations, we conclude that specialised Women’s Police Stations in the societies of the Global South widen access to justice, empower women to break the cycle of domestic violence, and engage in a form of community policing that challenges the social norms that sustain gender violence. As a by-product they also provide a career in law enforcement for police (male and female) who specialise in responding to gender violence. The study is framed by Southern Criminology which reverses the notion that ideas, policies and theories can only travel from the Global North to the Global South. The study is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and includes a multi-country team of researchers whose contributions we gratefully acknowledge.

Citation

English

Carrington, K. Sozzo, M. Puyol, M. V. Gamboa, M. Guala, N. Ghiberto, L. Zysman, D. (2019) The Role of Women’s Police Stations in Responding to and Preventing Gender Violence: Buenos Aires, Argentina: Final Report of Field Research. QUT Centre for Justice: Brisbane. Research Report Series 1.

Spanish
Carrington, Kerry , Sozzo, Maximo , Puyol, Maria Victoria , Gamboa, Marcela , Guala, Natacha , Ghiberto, Luciana , & Zysman, Diego (2019) El rol de las Comisarías de la Mujer en la prevención y el abordaje de la violencia de género, Buenos Aires, Argentina: Informe final de trabajo de campo. QUT Centre for Justice: Brisbane. Research Report Series 1.

For more information about the ARC project click here

Bridget Harris: ANZSOC New Scholar Prize 2019

Congratulations to QUT C4J member, Dr Bridget Harris, on her recent award of ANZSOC New Scholar Prize for 2019.  The New Scholar Prize is given each year for the best publication in criminology (or a related area) written by a member of the Society who qualifies as an early career researcher.

The article, co-authored with Delanie Woodlock , was published in British Journal of Criminology and  is titled, “Digital Coercive Control: Insights From Two Landmark Domestic Violence Studies”.  The authors present their recent studies on harmful and invasive behaviours enacted through technology.  Bridget applies her research focus of domestic and family violence (DFV) and spatiality, and the unique ‘spaceless’ features of technology-facilitated DFV.

The full article is available through open access and can be found here.

Congratulations to Bridget on a very successful year pioneering and further developing research into this very important area, both in Australia and internationally.  A well deserved award.