New Editorial Board International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy

Welcome to the New Editorial Board International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy

This is the 7th year of publication of the International Journal for Crime Justice and Social Democracy, which is committed to democratising knowledge through free to publish and free to download Open Access. We welcome our readers, reviewers, and International Editorial Board Members to another year of open access high quality publication. The demand to publish in our journal has grown exponentially over the last few years. We now receive a submission almost every day and so are very greatful to our reviewers. Our downloads are now over 100,000 per annum.

This year we welcome Associate Professor Matthew Ball as our new Assistant Editor and Dr Michael Chataway as our new Book Review Editor.

We thank Dr Kelly Richards for her contribution as Assistant Editor and Dr Bridget Harris for her contribution as Book Review Editor.

We look forward to working with you again this year.

Kerry Carrington and John Scott

Co Chief Editors

 

Review of Indigenous Policy in Cape York

A reduction in harmful alcohol consumption, drugs, violence and crime are among outcomes of 10 years of the Cape York Income Management program, a strategic review of the program by QUT School of Justice researchers, including John Scott, Angela Higginson and Mark Lauchs, has found.

Income management was one measure in the Cape York Welfare Reform (CYWR) initiative implemented in 2008 to address ‘passive dependence’ on welfare and improve social capital in Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

The review was conducted in the light of Cape York communities looking to make a decision about moving to new arrangements based on the empowerment/development model.

The review will help inform decisions on the future of welfare quarantining in Cape York and the role current income management practices could have in any future models.

The full report can be found at:

https://www.dss.gov.au/families-and-children-programs-services-welfare-quarantining-income-management/strategic-review-of-cape-york-income-management

 

Research: Young people with cognitive disabilities and their experiences with police

Young people with cognitive disabilities are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. While about 4% of young men and 3% of young women have a cognitive disability in Australia, a much higher proportion of young people in detention (about 14%) has some form of cognitive impairment.

To contribute towards understanding this problem, Dr Kelly Richards (School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology) and Dr Kathy Ellem (School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland) recently undertook interdisciplinary research on young people with cognitive disabilities’ first point of contact with the criminal justice system: the police. Funded by the Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation, the research drew on the disciplines of criminology, social work and disability studies, and involved interviews with service providers who work with young people with cognitive disabilities in south-east Queensland. The project also sought the views of young people themselves, and for the first time, gave voice to three young people with cognitive disabilities who had been in contact with the police.
The research yielded a number of key insights that make a significant contribution to this under-examined topic:

• Service providers identified the phenomenon of “escalation” – ie, that once in an interaction with police, young people with cognitive disabilities face a range of difficulties exiting or evading police contact in ways that other young people usually successfully manage. Young people with cognitive disability may become highly visible to police and are at heightened risk of cycling in and out of the criminal justice system as offenders.
• Service providers also identified that young people with cognitive disabilities often come into increased contact with police due to the complex constellations of disadvantage that this group commonly experiences, such as homelessness, being in out-of-home care, co-morbid mental health conditions, and poverty. Further, a young person with cognitive disability may present with complex behavioural issues that others close to them find difficult to manage. Parents of young people and youth residential workers have been reported to deliberately involve the police as a strategy to cope with a young person’s challenging behaviours, again leading to increased police contact.
Young people with cognitive disabilities themselves reported in their interviews that being treated by police in ways that are “procedurally just” (ie being able to have a say, being treated with dignity, respect and fairness) enhanced their interactions with police. For example, 18-year-old “Justin” appeared to have a positive experience of citizen participation in his interaction with police. He reported having being supported by his disability worker to make a statement to police about a physical assault he had experienced. He reported that the police were “nice”, gave him time to explain things and directed some questions to his disability support worker, which he found helpful.
Findings from the study underscore the urgent need for better non-criminal justice supports for families of young people with cognitive disabilities, skill development in staff of youth services to better respond to complex behaviours of young people, as well as improved police training on issues of both youth and disability. The authors have recently been invited to present their research to Queensland‘s Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women.

Publications from the research:
Richards, K., Ellem, K., Grevis-James, N. and Dwyer, A. (2017) Young people with cognitive impairments’ interactions with police in Queensland: A report to the Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation. Brisbane: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/109470/

Ellem, K. and Richards, K. (2018) Police contact with young people with cognitive disabilities: Perceptions of procedural (in)justice. Youth Justice: An International Journal https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1473225418794357

Richards, K. and Ellem, K. (2018) Young people with cognitive impairments and overrepresentation in the criminal justice system: Service provider perspectives. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15614263.2018.1473771

Co-hosted international conference Southern Criminology, Santa Fe, Argentina

Around 100 scholars from Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Columbia, UK, America, Singapore and Australia met at the international conference on Southern Criminology, co-hosted by the Faculty of Law, QUT and the Faculty of Law, Universidad Nacional del Litorel, Argentina 7-9 November 2018. The papers were simultaneously translated to bridge global divides, enhance inter-lingual dialogue and cross-cultural communication. The event was attended by 13 staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, QUT.

School of Justice, Faculty of Law Staff visit Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires

Aside

On Monday 10 November staff from the School of Justice, Faculty of Law QUT, visited the Faculty of Law, University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina (Faculdad de Derecho UBA). Professor Diego Zysman from UBA, who is also an adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Law QUT, met the group from QUT to undertake a private tour of the magnificent building, paintings, sculpture, history and architecture. The faculty has played an important role in the building of Argentina as a democratic nation.13 of the country’s Presidents did their law degree here, as have many of the Judges who tried the military juntas. The most famous Raúl Alfonsín was the first elected president after the fall of the military dictatorship 10 December 1983. This year the university will celebrate 35 years since the return of democracy in Argentina.

 

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Professor Sandra Walklate: Crime, Justice and Social Democracy 5th Biennial International Conference, Gold Coast, 2019

Professor Sandra Walklate has been confirmed as the first International Guest for the Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre 5th Biennial Conference being held on the Gold Coast from 15-17 July 2019.

Sandra Walklate is currently Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool, conjoint Chair of Criminology at Monash University in Melbourne and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Social Justice, QUT. She has been Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Criminology and in July 2019 becomes President of the British Society of Criminology. She has been researching in the field of criminal victimisation since the early 1980s and her recent publications reflect her ongoing and critical interests in this field, and the capacity of criminology to make sense of the impact of violence in particular on women’s lives.

Professor Walklate joins our Keynote Speaker, Professor Meda Chesney-Lind.

Keep an eye on the conference website for more details about other International Guests and Emerging Australian Scholars.

Click on the following link to submit an abstract: http://crimejusticeconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

 

 

 

 

 

Book, Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention


Associate Professor Michael Flood has published a new book, Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention.

Across the globe, violence prevention initiatives focused on men and boys are proliferating rapidly. Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention highlights effective and innovative strategies for the primary prevention of domestic violence, sexual violence, and other forms of harassment and abuse. It combines research on gender, masculinities, and violence with case studies from a wide variety of countries and settings. Through the cross-disciplinary examination of these varied efforts, this work will enable advocates, educators, and policy-makers to understand, assess, and implement programs and strategies which involve men and boys in initiatives to prevent violence against women.

The book is available from: https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137442109

Citation:

Flood, M. (2018). Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

New survey on young men’s attitudes to manhood

CJSDRC member, Associate Professor Michael Flood contributed to a new survey of young Australian men’s attitudes towards manhood, launched in Sydney and Melbourne in mid-October.

This study by Jesuit Social Services’ The Men’s Project, involving 1,000 men aged 18 to 30, has shown that young men who comply with society’s pressures to be a ‘real man’ report poorer mental health, are twice as likely to consider suicide, more likely to commit acts of sexual harassment and experience and perform acts of violence and bullying. See here for the report and accompanying materials.

https://jss.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/The-Man-Box-A-study-on-being-a-young-man-in-Australia.pdf

Dr Flood was commissioned to provide analysis of the study, and his commentary was published on pp. 46-63 of the full report.

https://theconversation.com/australian-study-reveals-the-dangers-of-toxic-masculinity-to-men-and-those-around-them-104694

Here Michael identifies key strategies for shifting dominant social norms of manhood. Michael also wrote a short summary of the report for The Conversation. Michael also contributed to extensive media coverage of the study, including participating in ABC TV and five radio interviews.

Event: Tuesday 23 October 2018 @ 6pm – A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis


Dear Members and Friends of the AIIA QLD,

IMPORTANT: Please note a venue for this event has not been finalised. Members will be notified as soon as a location is confirmed. We urge members to register as this is a high-profile event on a major issue. Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green is one of the panelists. You will note that the website lists the offices of Holding Redlich Lawyers as the venue. Please disregard this. It will be corrected when the new venue is known

Our next event is scheduled for TUESDAY the 23rd of October 2018, at 6 for 6:30pm. There will be a big turnout for this event. Please register by clicking here:  https://aiiaqld.tidyhq.com/public/schedule/events/21569-a-world-without-privacy-australia-s-role-in-an-international-privacy-crisis

All events are free for AIIA members. Non-members are welcome and can pay $15 (or $10 for student non-members) online while registering. Or they can pay at the door on the night. Drinks are available for purchase at the event, as well as copies of our latest policy commentary (which are free for our members). Details on all events for this month are available on our website and our Facebook page.

A world without privacy – Australia’s role in an international privacy crisis

An AIIA Qld Conversations event with Queensland Privacy Commissioner Philip Green, Angus Murray, and Dr Monique Mann

With the rise of social media platforms, digital profiles, transactions and subscriptions, an individuals’ data footprint is constantly expanding. Who owns that data? Is privacy a reality? And is Australian regulation tough enough? Both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights recognise privacy as a fundamental human right. But are these conventions being undermined by a data driven economy and international security concerns. If so, what is the effect of this? Will a loss of privacy equal a loss of autonomy?

With Australia’s privacy legislation under review and consideration, we seek to discuss the effects this will have on the world’s perceptions on Australia’s relationship with privacy. In light of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) setting the ‘golden standard’ on privacy, does Australia continue to lag behind? Join us for a conversation in which we discuss these important questions and more.

About our speakers

Philip Green was appointed to the position of Privacy Commissioner, Office of the Information Commissioner in December 2015. Philip has worked in many different Queensland Government roles and in private practice throughout his career.  Prior to his appointment as Privacy Commissioner, he was Executive Director, Small Business – Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business and the Commonwealth Games and has held this role since 2008.  He was responsible for leading Innovation Policy and Innovation Partnerships and Services and Office of Small Business Teams in the delivery of high level policy development, program management, service delivery and advice. Philip holds degrees in law and arts (with economic minor) and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland and High Court of Australia in February 1992. As the Privacy Commissioner Philip actively promotes and champions privacy rights and responsibilities in Queensland. In his role as Privacy Commissioner, Philip leads the staff in OIC responsible for mediating privacy complaints which have not been resolved with the Queensland Government agency involved; conducting reviews and audits of privacy compliance; giving compliance notices for serious, flagrant or recurring breaches of the privacy principles; and waiving or modifying an agency’s privacy obligations for a particular purpose or project.

Angus Murray is a practising solicitor and human rights advocate. He is a Vice President of the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, the Chair of Electronic Frontiers Australia’s Policy and Research Committee and a Partner and Trade Marks Attorney at Irish Bentley Lawyers. He is also a co-founder and national director of The Legal Forecast and a professional member of Australian Lawyers for Human Rights. He holds a Master of Laws from Stockholm University and his academic work has focused on the interaction between the right to privacy and the enforcement of intellectual property law.

Dr Monique Mann is the Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in Technology and Regulation at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology. She is a member of: The Crime, Justice and Social Democracy Research Centre (CJSDRC) at QUT Law; The Intellectual Property and Innovation Law (IPIL) Research Program at QUT Law; The International Law and Global Governance (ILGG) Research Program at QUT Law, and; The Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) at QUT Creative Industries Faculty. Dr Mann is advancing a program of socio-legal research on the intersecting topics of algorithmic justice, police technology, surveillance, and transnational online policing. She is on the Board of Directors of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

 

 

New research on what we know about small time ‘social’ drug dealers

What do we know about drug dealers? And how should the law deal with them? These issues are discussed in ABC Radio National’s weekly Law Report.

In the interview, Professor John Scott, from the Centre for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, discusses his recently published research in the International Journal of Drug Policy, exploring how eleven different countries deal with low end drug dealers or ‘social suppliers’.

This follows a previous study, two years ago, of interviews with two hundred small scale cannabis sellers around Australia.

Social supply of cannabis in Australia

For more, listen to the interview.