The search for Big Buddha

Tian Tan Buddah

Tian Tan Buddah

The day started early Sunday morning, after a smart decision to stay in on a Saturday night we journeyed off to see the Tian Tan Buddha discovering what the fuss is all about. It stands 34 metres high, made from a majestic bronze material and overlooks the North, designed to give a blessing to all it sees. Drawing pilgrims, tourists and locals amongst the lush mountainous scenery of Lantau Island. Sitting within the Po Lin Monarchy, the Tian Tan Buddha informally known as the Big Buddha was definitely a must see recommendation from all of us.

Named one of the ten engineering wonders of Hong Kong. It was created in 1993, the construction took 12 years to complete making its way on the world map as the biggest ever sitting Buddha statue built outdoors.

Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car

The journey to see this gigantic monument starts with a choice of a hike, known as the Ngong Ping trail or to take the scenic route on the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car, a popular choice for most. As fearful as some were feeling, we chose the glass bottom cable car. It is somewhat relaxing when souring over 50 metres high above beautiful green mountainside, light flowing creeks and scenic views as far as the eye can see. The excitement kicked in when we could see from afar the huge Buddha poking its head over the horizon.

After a short freak out when the cart stopped in midair, most were happy to jump off and explore the surroundings – (remember to bring your umbrella rain or shine). We walked onwards past the tempting touristy shops, briefly stopping to beat the heat with a bottle of water on the way. A further ten minutes or so we reached the bottom of the beginning of the 256 steps straight up to reach the enormous Buddha

Once reaching the top you can catch your breath and sit back and take in all the remarkable mountainous views, explore the history within the museum and get a selfie with the infamous Buddha. A great half day for all and another adventure ticked off the list in Hong Kong.

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